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Thread: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

  1. #2766
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    I've cut down a couple of rudders and replaced the missing wood with an endplate. There was no noticeable difference in performance or helm feel before and after. I think it was Bolger, a big fan of rudder endplates, who said he found that if the endplate area was equal to the "missing" end of the rudder, performance would be the same. That was my experience with the two experiments -- one on a 25' trimaran, the other on a 16' skiff. So if you add an endplate to a rudder that is already big enough, it can be argued that the effect is the same as lengthening the rudder. (Unnecessarily, adding drag to no benefit?) Whether or not it would reduce chatter or vibration is another question. If the turbulence creating the chatter was coming off the bottom edge of the foil, then one would expect an improvement.
    -Dave

  2. #2767
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    She is gorgeous!!!!!
    There is a joy in madness, that only mad men know. -Nieztsche

  3. #2768
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Time for the Spring haulout! Can't believe the February weather we are having down South. I was actually hot in my coveralls.

    The diver who was cleaning the bottom had me overly-concerned about the loss of antifoul along the seams. It was not nearly as bad as I thought it would be. I had planned on going with a more flexible and ablative paint. Now I think the harder paint I used would have been fine as long as I got the boat back in the water before the planks shrink much.




    Chuck Thompson

  4. #2769
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Here is my neighbor in the yard! A 16th century merchant replica built by Rockport Marine for the S.C. State Park called Charlestown Landing. A neat little boat. They are using Micron 66 antifoul which is exactly what I started out with.

    Chuck Thompson

  5. #2770
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Been using Micron 66 for years (though red) without a problem.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  6. #2771
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Well, I would have coated the planking with many mills of epoxy coating, (ie,interlux 404/414),while one had the chance(dry).
    Those exposed seams ARE a big deal, that is where the wee beasties come aboard.
    Every little nick in bare wood ...
    You can still do the hard paint, (trinidad) ,followed by soft. When the soft is gone, the hard can still be a worm barrier,even while hosting 2 inches of barnykills or 2 feet of sponge.

  7. #2772
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    re, Rudder play
    Fwiw, I inject epoxy resin into all my 3 metal gudgeons ,with the rudder in place. Virtual bushings.
    Yes , it glues the rudder in place, but it wags a bit, then I put liquid lanolin down there . (while hauled out, obviously)
    My one inch steel pintles have worn away quite a bit over 30 years, but with this technique, they stay quiet and wear and corrosion is minimized.

  8. #2773
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Hey Bruce. How's the Carib?

    My gudgeon/pintles are pretty tight. The new rudder warped a bit and I'm guessing that's the issue. Before I saw the warp, I was thinking I made the trailing edge too wide. It's a high-speed chatter--not a rattle like its loose.

    Got a lot done last three days. Two coats topsides and two bottom paint and all the sanding in-between. Some epoxy-filler repair of dings and scratches. Repaint the bootstripe tomorrow, clean and repaint the bilges and I'm good to go.
    Last edited by chuckt; 02-21-2017 at 10:03 AM.
    Chuck Thompson

  9. #2774
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Chuck, the whole point of 66 is its longevity, which is how they justify the price of the stuff. Here its literally double the cost of the usual ablatives. Being at the harder end of the ablative spectrum , what you need to be doing is hard sanding back, or scotchbriting to enliven it every year or two.If you don't do that you tend to get a build up in spots and before you know it its time to scrape it all off again.
    I've had an extraordinary run out of it but the boat is coldmoulded so there aren't any cracks or movement that compromises it.
    If your boat is anything like our old boat ( Waione) the boat I maintained for 25 years, it needed work annually, so I ended up putting an ablative on and every year it would get just enough put back on to get through. Ie two coats on leading edges and wear spots, waterline etc, and one pretty thin coat everywhere else.
    66 just doesn't fit economically in that situation and like I said , will build up relative to a softer type.
    We're going to haul Riada fairly soon ourselves . We'll have about 18months on a mixture of 66 and 77, so it'll be interesting to see how she is. My expectation is that she'll need a scotchbrite up to reactivate it in part, I might do that all over and slick a thin coat on just because we're out and that works for us.
    I'm a big fan of 66/ 77 but only because we can extend our time in the water( 3 years last time, with a few dives and a few floating dock cleans). I really don't think its appropriate for a traditional/ carvel boat with movement in its seams and butts .

  10. #2775
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckt View Post



    It looks like whoever was working the pressure washer didn't do your planking any favors. Looks like tearout there at the top!


    Whatever become of the haulout bill for the rudder mishap.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens, and Sh!t happens more than Should happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

  11. #2776
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    John--I completely agree with you. The 66 I used last year can at least serve as a backup barrier coat to this year's ablative paint.

    Ben--those are marks from the slings of the yard I used last year (same yard that broke the rudder). Another reason I won't go back there. There were a couple of minor spots where this year's pressure wash guy got a little too hard but nothing significant. A dab of epoxy with fairing filler took care of those.

    I got done yesterday with everything except one thing: I want to wash out any silt that may have accumulated in the prop shaft housing. I was surprised by the 1" layer of fine silt mud under the engine. I moved my primary bilge pump under the engine (that's the lowest point). I debated doing this because, obviously, I can't get to it very easily if something goes wrong. But, this should help that silt accumulation and I do have a secondary pump located higher.


    She will go back in Wednesday. I'll be sure to post some pictures. Her hull looks pretty sharp right now.
    Chuck Thompson

  12. #2777
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckt View Post
    .

    I got done yesterday with everything except one thing: I want to wash out any silt that may have accumulated in the prop shaft housing. I was surprised by the 1" layer of fine silt mud under the engine. I moved my primary bilge pump under the engine (that's the lowest point). I debated doing this because, obviously, I can't get to it very easily if something goes wrong. But, this should help that silt accumulation and I do have a secondary pump located higher.
    The fine silt (from "plough mud") that pervades the southeast rivers, creeks and barrier islands regions can cause problems with raw water cooling systems also. When we lived there the telltale on our outboard would occasionally only drip, which signified that the cooling passages were clogged. It took a while running with a fresh water flush to clear them.
    If I had a dollar for every girl who found me unattractive, eventually they would find me attractive.

  13. #2778
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Good luck with the launch tomorrow, ChuckT.
    We on the icy downeast coast of Maine salute you.

    Q.

  14. #2779
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    The fine silt (from "plough mud") that pervades the southeast rivers, creeks and barrier islands regions can cause problems with raw water cooling systems also. When we lived there the telltale on our outboard would occasionally only drip, which signified that the cooling passages were clogged. It took a while running with a fresh water flush to clear them.
    I didn't even think about the engine.
    Chuck Thompson

  15. #2780
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Q.Foster View Post
    Good luck with the launch tomorrow, ChuckT.
    We on the icy downeast coast of Maine salute you.

    Q.
    Thanks Q. I felt a little guilty sailing in February thinking about my friends up North.
    Chuck Thompson

  16. #2781
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckt View Post
    I didn't even think about the engine.
    From time to time you might try running Saltaway through your raw water strainer on through the engine: http://www.saltawayproducts.com/Products.htm
    If I had a dollar for every girl who found me unattractive, eventually they would find me attractive.

  17. #2782
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    That sounds like a good idea Dave.

    Realized today that there was way too much friction in the cutlass bearing. Even with soapy water, it was too tight. Pulled the shaft out a bit and I could clearly see the cutlass bearing wore down the prop shaft. How does that happen? Somehow the cutlass rubber expanded? Or perhaps the wrong size put in by the prior owner. Misalignment? I am sure it is aligned at the transmission coupling but I suppose it's possible the new sternpost moved and misaligned the aft housing that contains the cutlass?

    So, we are needing a new shaft and cutlass. I'll have to have the yard do it. I can't take anymore days off in the next couple of weeks to take care of it myself.

    Other than that, she is purtied up and ready to go.

    Last edited by chuckt; 02-22-2017 at 08:30 PM.
    Chuck Thompson

  18. #2783
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    No--it wouldn't align at the engine if the alignment at the cutlass was off. So--not sure what happened.
    Chuck Thompson

  19. #2784
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    a new shaft? because of damage from a tight fitting cutlass bearing?
    there has to be something else going on...

  20. #2785
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    She still out of the water? pull the stuffin box hose ( or bellows, if you have a dripless box), away from the shaft tube, forward, just a few inches.Be sure that the shaft is in, and stays in, the center of the tube on the inside, as the feeler thingy is being applied to the couplings.
    dontaskmehowiknowthis
    Last edited by wizbang 13; 02-22-2017 at 09:49 PM.

  21. #2786
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    The engine/shaft couplings can "read" that they are well aligned, but under/behind the stuffing box, the shaft may be wearing /hitting the inside edge of the tube!
    zat make any sense?

  22. #2787
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    I'd loosen up the cutlass bearing housing & see if it frees up - even to the point of taking the lag bolts/studs out. I had to build an epoxy "pad" under mine to get it aligned correctly - it doesn't take much to bind.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  23. #2788
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    I did pull the coupler apart. As near as I could tell, everything was aligned. Of course, there's a good possibility the boat assumed a new shape after being on the hard these many years and getting a new sternpost.

    Garret-I had to do the same thing when I put the housing on the new sternpost. Perhaps I'll have to modify my pad. We'll see when we get the new shaft installed.

    Like Bruce, I do suspect something besides a bearing that suddenly became tight??? I suppose it's possible the prop shaft wore the cutlass bearing in such a way that the misalignment did not show up at the coupling. I will pull that aft housing and see if that can tell me what's going on.
    Last edited by chuckt; 02-23-2017 at 09:20 AM.
    Chuck Thompson

  24. #2789
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Time for the third haulout. Last year's marina significantly increased the DIY yard charge. There is a small Marina up the Cooper River that charges $1 per foot per day. Much better. A lot of fishing boats go there for their repairs. I have the usual painting to do as well as varnish the mast. I also need to install a forgotten stopwater in the sternpost/horn timber seam. It has been the cause of a very aggravating trickle into the boat.

    We are far enough inland that, at low tide, the water is almost entirely fresh. Hence this little friendly critter.

    IMG_6503 2.jpg

    Interesting that there are some shrimpers here going back into service. Apparently, there is some better demand for wild shrimp. Ask a fisherman and he will deny it but there are boats being added to the fleet.

    IMG_6507.jpg

    And here's Mary-Ellen helping to paint Mary Ellen.

    IMG_6519.jpg
    Chuck Thompson

  25. #2790
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    I'm sorry about the sideways pictures. They look right before I upload them.
    Chuck Thompson

  26. #2791
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    How have you been enjoying the boat? Good luck with that stopwater.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  27. #2792
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    She looks great Chuck!

  28. #2793
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Seems a good place to be with the weather forecast.
    -Dave

  29. #2794
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    How have you been enjoying the boat? Good luck with that stopwater.
    She's not been sailed much the past 12 months. We built a new house and that sucked up nearly all my available spare time. Hopefully, I'll get some more time on the water this Fall and Winter.

    I'll do the stopwater tomorrow. I think I will also have to add a spline (aka Gump-wedge) to that area as I don't have a good caulking seam at all. There is quite a gap. I think it was there when I restored her. I really should have addressed it then instead of just planning to put a lot of caulking in there. Also some punky wood on the horn timber. More pics on that later.
    Last edited by chuckt; 09-10-2018 at 04:17 AM.
    Chuck Thompson

  30. #2795
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    Seems a good place to be with the weather forecast.
    That's the truth. In fact, I may get locked in the yard if people start hauling their boats to avoid the hurricanes. Every available spot in the yard will get used.
    Chuck Thompson

  31. #2796
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    Default Re: Concordia Yawl #26 Restoration

    Well, Florence's path is far enough North that the Charleston crowd didn't panic. Only a few showed up at the yard for haulout.

    One of the big jobs is to address the leak at the sternpost/horntimber join. It appears tight as a tick but that might be because her weight is on the ground. The planking didn't fit well in the sternpost rabbet so I decided to put in a Gump-wedge (spline?). First step was to create a uniform slot of about 1/4"



    After that I added a stop water using this crude, but effective, jig to guide the drill bit. I pounded in a juniper dowel that I compressed with a dowel jig that basically has a counter sink on one side. I was very afraid it wouldn't go all the way through because it was that tight. I hope it's not too tight but AWC is pretty soft wood so I don't think it cause a problem with the joint.



    Then I shaped and glued (on the stern post side) some juniper (AWC)



    After that, I had to leave for the day. The area is under mandatory evacuation, so I'm not sure when I will get back to the boat. Hopefully Saturday. (today is Tuesday). Maybe I can sneak down backroads on Friday.
    Last edited by chuckt; 09-11-2018 at 08:59 PM.
    Chuck Thompson

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