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Thread: Nova Scotia

  1. #1
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    Default Nova Scotia

    Happy New Years Gents/Ladies,

    I have not been on here in a while but do lurk from time to time. I wonder if the Nova Scotian’s on the forum could help me with some general information on NS. I am getting close to retiring and my wife and I are considering a move to NS. I have never been there but always wanted to move to NS. It’s a beautiful place and the folks that I have met have been very nice. Hopefully we can get a sail in on the Bluenose 2 but they have not released their 2020 schedule yet. It’s a lifelong dream of mine to do that.

    We have been looking at real estate online and are planning a trip this May for a few weeks. She shows horses competitively so we will need a small acreage, home, barn, shop etc. It would be great to be on the ocean if that works out. I don’t really want a fixer upper but if the property was just right you never know. I’ll also need a place to berth or moor a sailboat. I would imagine the biting insects get denser as you travel in land and the closer to bogs, marshes etc. How are they on the coast? How about humidity?

    Any general thoughts or recommendation’s would be welcome and appreciated.

    Thanks in advance, Dale
    Last edited by Northernguy59; 01-01-2020 at 06:07 PM.
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    As a person currently living north of some of NS & having always been interested in it, I'm butting in so I can watch what you get for replies.

    I'll be winning Natalie McMaster's contest to visit Cape Breton, so I'll get a trip in soon
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Thanks, Garrett, I did not know of this, but do now and have entered, your odds have just decreased a bit. If I were not so freaking old, I would consider immigration to Canada.
    Steve Martinsen

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by SMARTINSEN View Post
    Thanks, Garrett, I did not know of this, but do now and have entered, your odds have just decreased a bit. If I were not so freaking old, I would consider immigration to Canada.
    Me & my big mouth!

    I would definitely consider it, but there's this woman in the house who wouldn't...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Hello, Dale. I am not a horse guy, so cannot help much in that department, but I am a born-and-raised Nova Scotian and - after a peripatetic career that took me all over Hell's Half-Acre - I live here. If you are reading real estate ads, you realize that land and real estate is not dirt cheap here, but much less than in more urban areas in central Canada. There is a fair amount of pressure for waterfront property, so a no-fixer-upper with acreage and buildings for horses are both a bit rare and a bit spendy. Not to say that a good, inexpensive place is not available, but there are few of them. If you can be happy with a trip of ten or fifteen minutes to get to the shore, then there are many more options. I'll do a quick run-down of the major areas for you, starting in the north and mking my way down to my end of the province:

    Cape Breton - beautiful, acreage available at reasonable prices, hilly/mountainous (big hills, really, but indulge us - they are the only things we got that we can call 'mountain'), a long way from everywhere else, wonderful people, known for heavy snowfalls in winter. Excellent sailing in the Bras d'Or Lake (really an inland salt-water sea), surprisingly few yacht facilities on the Atlantic and Strait coasts.

    Northumberland Shore - looking out across the Strait to Prince Edward Island, acreage available at reasonable prices, still a long way from everywhere else; warm, if a bit taciturn, Scottish-decent people, warmest seawater beaches north of the Carolinas, minimal yachting facilities.

    Eastern Shore - north of Halifax on the Atlantic coast; rugged & rocky, heavily forested, lots of lakes, minimal population. Highways leave a bit to be desired. Quite rural. Lots of small fishing coves, minimal yachting facilities. Nice folks in the area.

    Halifax Municipality - lots of people, little land availability, and expensive. I don't think this is what you have in mind.

    Annapolis Valley - probably the best horse country. Is the 'breadbasket of the province'; lots of farmland, wide open spaces. Small farms available in the hills on either side of the valley floor, prices are reasonable. Good highway system, local university town (Wolfville, home of Acadia University). Downside is that the local shoreline is the Bay of Fundy with its ten-metre tides, which makes sailing a daunting prospect. No yacht facilities, a few fishing ports. Quiet, friendly people.

    South Shore - south of Halifax on the Atlantic coast. Rocky coastline, heavily forested hilly interior with lots of lakes. Moderate population (heavier in the north towards Halifax), friendly folk. Small farms available, moderate number of horses in the area so there are tack shops, experienced vets, etc. (again. more so in the north towards Halifax), Prices are a bit higher here than in other areas outside of Halifax (especially around the wealthy & yachty enclave of Chester), but land quality is good. Good highways, good beaches, good harbours and yacht facilities. I admit to prejudism as this is my home area, but I think that this would be your best area to concentrate on for its combination of infrastructure, land, boating, and price combination. The farther south you go from Halifax the poorer the soil, fewer facilities, and better prices.

    I live at the very southern tip of the province (Yarmouth). We have the warmest weather year-round, are a long way from anything except lobsters, but we have an interesting mix of English and Acadian cultures with a seafaring background, so it's a pleasant place to be. If you come out east to explore possibilities, give me a shout and I'll do my best to be a good host and show you around the places I know.

    I saved the ugly part for the last, and don't know if this has an impact on horses or not. We have deer ticks in NS, concentrated in the south and thinning as you go north. I have a dog & a cat and we are able to keep them bug-free with modern chemistry, so I expect that the same can be done for horses, but I just don't know. But I can introduce you to people who would know - one of our daughter's childhood friends is a veterinarian, another is a horse owner.

    Good luck with your search, and have fun hunting...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    I have visited many times over the years. If I were 20 years younger, your age Northenguy, I would seriously consider a permanent move there, but at 85 my roots are too deep. Wonderful climate, great people, seafood, scenery, etc. Love the place. Go.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Hello, Dale. I am not a horse guy, so cannot help much in that department, but I am a born-and-raised Nova Scotian and - after a peripatetic career that took me all over Hell's Half-Acre - I live here. If you are reading real estate ads, you realize that land and real estate is not dirt cheap here, but much less than in more urban areas in central Canada. There is a fair amount of pressure for waterfront property, so a no-fixer-upper with acreage and buildings for horses are both a bit rare and a bit spendy. Not to say that a good, inexpensive place is not available, but there are few of them. If you can be happy with a trip of ten or fifteen minutes to get to the shore, then there are many more options. I'll do a quick run-down of the major areas for you, starting in the north and mking my way down to my end of the province:

    Cape Breton - beautiful, acreage available at reasonable prices, hilly/mountainous (big hills, really, but indulge us - they are the only things we got that we can call 'mountain'), a long way from everywhere else, wonderful people, known for heavy snowfalls in winter. Excellent sailing in the Bras d'Or Lake (really an inland salt-water sea), surprisingly few yacht facilities on the Atlantic and Strait coasts.

    Northumberland Shore - looking out across the Strait to Prince Edward Island, acreage available at reasonable prices, still a long way from everywhere else; warm, if a bit taciturn, Scottish-decent people, warmest seawater beaches north of the Carolinas, minimal yachting facilities.

    Eastern Shore - north of Halifax on the Atlantic coast; rugged & rocky, heavily forested, lots of lakes, minimal population. Highways leave a bit to be desired. Quite rural. Lots of small fishing coves, minimal yachting facilities. Nice folks in the area.

    Halifax Municipality - lots of people, little land availability, and expensive. I don't think this is what you have in mind.

    Annapolis Valley - probably the best horse country. Is the 'breadbasket of the province'; lots of farmland, wide open spaces. Small farms available in the hills on either side of the valley floor, prices are reasonable. Good highway system, local university town (Wolfville, home of Acadia University). Downside is that the local shoreline is the Bay of Fundy with its ten-metre tides, which makes sailing a daunting prospect. No yacht facilities, a few fishing ports. Quiet, friendly people.

    South Shore - south of Halifax on the Atlantic coast. Rocky coastline, heavily forested hilly interior with lots of lakes. Moderate population (heavier in the north towards Halifax), friendly folk. Small farms available, moderate number of horses in the area so there are tack shops, experienced vets, etc. (again. more so in the north towards Halifax), Prices are a bit higher here than in other areas outside of Halifax (especially around the wealthy & yachty enclave of Chester), but land quality is good. Good highways, good beaches, good harbours and yacht facilities. I admit to prejudism as this is my home area, but I think that this would be your best area to concentrate on for its combination of infrastructure, land, boating, and price combination. The farther south you go from Halifax the poorer the soil, fewer facilities, and better prices.

    I live at the very southern tip of the province (Yarmouth). We have the warmest weather year-round, are a long way from anything except lobsters, but we have an interesting mix of English and Acadian cultures with a seafaring background, so it's a pleasant place to be. If you come out east to explore possibilities, give me a shout and I'll do my best to be a good host and show you around the places I know.

    I saved the ugly part for the last, and don't know if this has an impact on horses or not. We have deer ticks in NS, concentrated in the south and thinning as you go north. I have a dog & a cat and we are able to keep them bug-free with modern chemistry, so I expect that the same can be done for horses, but I just don't know. But I can introduce you to people who would know - one of our daughter's childhood friends is a veterinarian, another is a horse owner.

    Good luck with your search, and have fun hunting...
    Good morning Sir and thank you for the thoughtful information and the kind offer, I just may take you up on that.

    My wife and I are both real estate junkies and in a former life I was a broker and had my own agency. We are always looking at real estate. We have spent considerable time reading about most parts of the areas you mentioned. We learned some things from your response. We are in BC now and the prices here are sky high in comparison to NS. For us the prices in NS are very reasonable but like you said it depends where we want to live. We have spotted an interesting property that we will look at in May and it’s in Yarmouth County. An acreage on the coast, nice home, shop but I would have to build a barn and do some fencing which is not a problem for me. I am a carpenter by trade. I am now a Construction Manager and work in Industrial construction. I plan to start consulting and begin a graduated retirement.

    We are focusing on the Eastern and Southern areas of the NS. There seems to be some nice horse arenas and facilities scattered around so she needs to be in a reasonable driving distance which does not seem to be a problem. She was raised in New Jersey and her folks had a summer home on the Jersey coast and sailed all over the area. Her father was an avid sailor and is now 94 years old and still sharp as a tack. Doctor, WW2 vet and my hero. Time is getting short so this move will get us closer to hm and maybe we will be lucky enough to bring him up for a few summers. Last year I chartered a sailboat and my wife and FIL went out and had the time of his life ! Hopefully we can do more of this if it all comes together.

    I will keep this updated as we go along and thanks so much for the responses.

    Dale
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldad View Post
    I have visited many times over the years. If I were 20 years younger, your age Northenguy, I would seriously consider a permanent move there, but at 85 my roots are too deep. Wonderful climate, great people, seafood, scenery, etc. Love the place. Go.
    Thanks Oldad for the encouraging words of wisdom !

    Dale
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Contact Paul Gartside, boat designer and builder, who also lived in BC, found it very expensive and moved to Shelburne NS with his US wife (from Long island) and two children: http://www.gartsideboats.com/

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    Contact Paul Gartside, boat designer and builder, who also lived in BC, found it very expensive and moved to Shelburne NS with his US wife (from Long island) and two children: http://www.gartsideboats.com/
    Thanks,

    BC = Bring Cash
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Dale, Yarmouth County could well be your paradise or your hell. I have been living here for about eight years and in that time I have heard countless horror stories about the difficulties of getting a house built. I didn't build my house, but I've had a couple of tradesman-related disappointments. It seems to take f-o-r-e-v-e-r to get anything done. I am not sure why, though I have a couple of ideas about it. Most houses here are stick-built with full basement and siding-over-ply sheathing; the average size is around 2500 sq. ft. (excluding basement), and they are built one at a time (no housing developments with dozens of houses being built at the same time). In my not-critical observations, it seems to take at least a year to complete one (there is a house nearby me that is probably 3500 sq, ft. with stone fascia on the front that has been under construction for going on three years now). The wait time for an electrician or a plumber to do their thing on a new construction is around 3 - 5 months and when they do arrive on-site, they are liable to take off after 3 weeks to another job and return a month or two later to do the next bits. Many of the people I talk to complain bitterly about this. There isn't a building boom here, but I can't help but think that the area is crying for a contractor firm that will Get Things Done in a timely manner. I have also heard people complain that it is difficult to find a finish carpenter with any level of skills - they know how to do things one way, and cannot cope with new materials or methods.

    But it is pretty here, and very little crime...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    Contact Paul Gartside, boat designer and builder, who also lived in BC, found it very expensive and moved to Shelburne NS with his US wife (from Long island) and two children: http://www.gartsideboats.com/
    I believe that Mr. Gartside moved away from Shelburne last year or the year before. He now lives in East Hampton, New York.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    "The wait time for an electrician or a plumber to do their thing on a new construction is around 3 - 5 months and when they do arrive on-site, they are liable to take off after 3 weeks"

    Guys who take 3 weeks for a rough-in tend not to last for long in the residential construction industry. As a long-time carpenter contractor/new-homebuilder with excellent finishing skills I'll have to call you on BS. The guys who are good at this adapt to the new technology as required; there are others who are operators of the new technology, subtle difference.

    Dale, my having a daughter in the show-jumping business around Calgary would make me wonder if you would benefit from a more central location in the Maritimes to minimize trailer time. There was/is a thriving standardbred industry there (I'm a native PEIslander) and you may find suitable properties in close proximity to any of the various regional racetracks. Congrats on getting up to that retirement position! / Jim

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    "The wait time for an electrician or a plumber to do their thing on a new construction is around 3 - 5 months and when they do arrive on-site, they are liable to take off after 3 weeks"

    Guys who take 3 weeks for a rough-in tend not to last for long in the residential construction industry. As a long-time carpenter contractor/new-homebuilder with excellent finishing skills I'll have to call you on BS. The guys who are good at this adapt to the new technology as required; there are others who are operators of the new technology, subtle difference.

    Dale, my having a daughter in the show-jumping business around Calgary would make me wonder if you would benefit from a more central location in the Maritimes to minimize trailer time. There was/is a thriving standardbred industry there (I'm a native PEIslander) and you may find suitable properties in close proximity to any of the various regional racetracks. Congrats on getting up to that retirement position! / Jim
    Chaz,

    Thanks for the input. Your location says Vancouver Island, how long have you been in NS ? Interesting thoughts in the standard bred idea. My wife will retire from shows in a few years, so trailer time will be decreasing. She will however ride until her last breath!

    Dale
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    Guys who take 3 weeks for a rough-in tend not to last for long in the residential construction industry. As a long-time carpenter contractor/new-homebuilder with excellent finishing skills I'll have to call you on BS. The guys who are good at this adapt to the new technology as required; there are others who are operators of the new technology, subtle difference.
    Call me on bull**** as much as you like, chas; you do not live here, I do. Until you have local knowledge, you are blowing hot air out of your ass. You may well be a "long-time carpenter contractor/new-homebuilder with excellent finishing skills", but you are not HERE. IF you are as good as you say you are and were here, maybe I wouldn't have had to say what I did. I have lived all over god's good creation, seen a lot of construction, and number of general contractors and good carpenters are among my friends. I don't bang nails for a living, but I do know what I am talking about (most times <grin>) when it comes to construction trades. Building a large boat/small ship is as complex (probably more) as building a house, and my job for the past decade-and-a-half has been quoting, bidding, and managing multi-million-dollar build projects. This included dealing with carpenters.

    Oh, and another thing: Horseracing tracks are closing around here as fast as VHS video rental stores. There may yet be a track or two still open on the Island, but I don't think that there is one left operating in NS anymore.

    ^Update: I see that the Truro Raceway has re-opened after a closure due to financial insolvency. It has been struggling for years.
    Last edited by mmd; 01-02-2020 at 01:58 PM.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    I have always wondered what Canso is like? Matt Walsh, "The Wizard of Hurricane Gultch" (San Pedro Ca) was the skipper of "Pirate" who cleaned house at the R Boat Nationals was from there originally. He was a formidable designer/builder prior to WWII.
    Jay

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I have always wondered what Canso is like? Matt Walsh, "The Wizard of Hurricane Gultch" (San Pedro Ca) was the skipper of "Pirate" who cleaned house at the R Boat Nationals was from there originally. He was a formidable designer/builder prior to WWII.
    Jay
    Canso is also where they have the annual Stan Fest in honor of Stan Rogers, one of my favorite musicians who died way to young.

    Interesting note Jay, I will have to research Matt Walsh.

    Dale
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I have always wondered what Canso is like? Matt Walsh, "The Wizard of Hurricane Gultch" (San Pedro Ca) was the skipper of "Pirate" who cleaned house at the R Boat Nationals was from there originally. He was a formidable designer/builder prior to WWII.
    Jay
    Canso is a lovely small town with a rich history that has been on 'hard times' for a decade or two due to the collapse of the Northern cod stock. The major employer in the town had been a large National Sea Products fish processing plant and the ships associated with it. Once the cod were gone, so were the jobs. Times became hard enough that the town could not meet its financial commitments from its tax base revenue and agreed to abandon its town charter and as of July 2012 was amalgamated into the Municipality of the District of Guysborough. It is, however, the host of the annual Stan Rogers Folk Festival, which is a grand entertainment. The ex-town has quite a rich history, from its founding in 1604, its role in the defeat of the French Fortress Louisbourg, to it's cable office being the site of the first received distress signal from the Titanic. In early 2017, Maritime Launch Services announced it intended to lease land near Canso to build and operate Canada's only active commercial spaceport, using the Ukrainian Cyclone-4M rocket. With construction slated to begin in 2018, the first launch was expected in 2019. It didn't happen, but locals are still hoping to see rockets blasting into space in the near future.

    It's a pretty place, too:

    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    MMD -- very good briefing. Nice of you to take the time.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Wow! Thanks for posting that picture of Canso plus the good info MMD. Northern Guy how far is that from Oak Island? Your info is appreciated as well!

    Matt Walsh used to speak of when the schooner fleet came in under sail, they had no engines then. He said they would come recing in, make a big loop, drop a stern anchor during it, coast forward and drop the bow hook and pull back on the after rode. The boats would line up perfectly withing feet of one and other just like it was nothing at all to do! As a result, he never had an engine in the boats he designed and built.
    Jay

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Hello Dale,

    Although I'm now In Victoria BC, I spent 20 years in Riverport NS, near Lunenburg in the South Shore.
    Most of what needs to said has been said, but I can add my vote for the South Shore.
    It's a gorgeous area with splendid cruising and yacht services, Pretty little towns and plenty of farmland.
    And most of all, some of the nicest people I've ever met.
    I designed and built custom oceanfront homes and can echo some of the frustrations with subtrades.
    It seemed so many were drawn away to the oil patch.

    I must also confirm that the ticks are a significant issue.

    You'll love Nova Scotia.

    Cheers,
    Peter

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    It's weird how it can turn out. I've seen it too, useless busineses kicking good ones out of business.
    The recepe seems to be charge far less, make up excuses when not delivering in time and just wear the customer down. After a while many will just give up and you have won.
    To be clear I despice that behaviour.

    /Mats

    I'm so educated. Computer engineer, boat builder, rigger, cabinet maker. I could add sail maker and rope maker, but it would be a strech to say I'm an expert there.
    Yet I know nothing.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Thanks to all you guys for the thoughtful input. I am running a large industrial project on the west coast and we are always having major issues with sub contractors so it's not just in residential construction. Safety is the biggest issue for us these days. I'm glad I am at the end of my career, it's painful.

    Jay, I have no idea where Oak Island is. I will be in Port Townsend sometime this summer and if your around I would like to get together for a cup if your up to it ? I found your thread on Matt Walsh ! My kind of guy for sure.

    Dale
    Last edited by Northernguy59; 01-02-2020 at 09:11 PM.
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Seein's how this is my thread and Stan Rogers was brought up, I feel it's my duty to share a very moving song for me, with you.

    https://youtu.be/uXDSGJky4qk

    Dale
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Dale, let me know when you are visiting PT. We will have to ge together for a beer and a gam.
    Jay

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    I don't come to the WBF much anymore but can't resist a response since, like MMD, I have lived, worked and sailed in Nova Scotia all my life. I live in Chester, a lovely village on the south shore about 45 minutes from Halifax and handy to Oak Island. Great sailing, excellent amenities and an active equestrian community (about which I know nothing beyond the fact that it exists). Housing is expensive right around hereby Nova Scotian standards but prices taper off as you get further away from Halifax.

    MMD's comments are all spot on except that I differ on the attractions of Canso. It is the fog capital of Nova Scotia, or at least a close runner up behind Cape Sable down near Yarmouth and Louisbourg at the eastern tip of Cape Breton. I have sailed by all of them quite a few times, rarely seeing much beyond the bowsprit. The road to Canso is long and brutally rough and the town is very tired looking. Maybe the spaceport will bring it back to life if that ever comes to pass.

    Anyway, Nova Scotia in all its varieties is a wonderful place to live and we welcome newcomers. Best wishes.

    Wilson

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    I recently moved away from Nova Scotia to Newfoundland after living in various places in NS for most of my life: Halifax, Bridgewater on the South Shore, Greenwood and Berwick in the Annapolis Valley. Everything mmd said is spot on. One consideration that may factor into your search is distance from Halifax, the only major city for things such as serious medical care, major cultural and sporting events, the international airport, and the biggest retailers such as Costco. Here are some guidelines,approximate driving times to Halifax from my memory (+/-):
    Bridgewater - 1 hour
    Annapolis Valley - 1 hour
    Truro - 1 hour
    Shelburne - 2 hours
    Digby - 2 hours
    Yarmouth - 3 hours
    New Glasgow / Pictou - 2 hours
    Cape Breton - 3- 4 hours

    From the Annapolis Valley to the South Shore - approximately 1 hour

    Some other random thoughts on the Annapolis Valley since that is where I am most familiar with:
    The Annapolis Valley is a pretty much strail line of small towns with space between some, but in some places bordering each other. From West to East:
    Bridgetown - inexpensive real estate, very little industry
    Lawrencetown - inexpensive real estate, very little industry
    Middleton - inexpensive real estate, very little industry but have a community college, also have a medical clinic
    Kingston / Greenwood - moderate priced real estate, influenced by CFB Greenwood, good shopping
    Aylesford - inexpensive real estate, very little industry
    Berwick - moderate priced real estate. A very progressive town with great facilities and a medical clinic.
    Waterville - inexpensive real estate, very little industry
    Coldbrook - higher priced real estate, industrial parks, borders Kentville, morning and evening traffic snarl
    Kentville - higher priced real estate, great facilities
    New Minas - the shopping bag of the valley, all the big stores except Costco, a traffic snarl always.
    Wolfville - The highest priced real estate in the valley, Acadia University town with the pro's and con's that come with being that. The most "Cultural" area of the valley because of the university.

    There are lots of other areas off that main line that are nice also. There are a lot of stables and riding related facilities all up and down the Valley.
    I have 2 brothers and a sister all living along the top of the North Mountain on the bay of Fundy all about 10-20 minutes from the Valley floor. Victoria Harbour, Harbourville, and Baxters Harbour. I still have a lot of contacts there if I can be of any help.
    Stay calm, be brave....wait for the signs. Possibly precariously prevaricating.
    .

  28. #28
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    568

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Good evening gents,

    You guys are incredibly helpful with the time and effort you put into your responses. I am very grateful and will consider each and every point made. I think we are going to rent a vehicle in Halifax and do the loop around. We are hopeful we will have some places picked out by then to look at. After we are done there we will head over to New Jersey to see my FIL for a week. i think I will book another day charter to take him out on. The one I booked last year was on a 39' Freya, A glass boat but a beauty. I am not sure if the ferry from Yarmouth to Bar Head is in operation again ?? I looked on the web site and there is no 2020 schedule which leads me to believe they are not sure if it will be running or not. I heard the new wharf at Bar Head is behind schedule.

    Jay, I am not sure of my schedule but I may go for the boat show, I'd enjoy having a good chin wag with you and a pint or two.

    Sincere thanks, Dale
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    24,086

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    I believe that Mr. Gartside moved away from Shelburne last year or the year before. He now lives in East Hampton, New York.
    Yes, they did but he kept his boatshop in Shelburne and makes trips up there from time to time. They sold their charming house in the town so he may have some experience (perhaps dated) about real estate thereabouts. But Northernguy59 has real estate experience of his own....

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    48,282

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    A nice sailing commute of three or four days.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    31,612

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Bar Harbor to Halifax.

    February 25, 2019
    We’re very excited The CAT is coming back home to Bar Harbor in 2019. From the 2020 season going forward, we anticipate our operating season will commence around Memorial Day weekend (last weekend of May). This year we are undertaking a substantial rebuilding of the Bar Harbor ferry terminal to prepare for the return of The CAT. Our scheduled season start for 2019 is, therefore, June 21. Because of the complexity of the work we, along with many partners, are doing it is always possible that this start date could change. We’ll keep you posted of any change as soon as we know. Feel free to contact us any time at 1-877-762-7245 or visit ferries.ca for an update.
    Thanks for your support, and we look forward to seeing you this summer.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    48,282

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    I was thinking of the sail from Gardner's Bay to Shelburne. It would be perhaps twice that long from Shelburne to Gardner's.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    St. Simon\'s Island, GA, USA
    Posts
    5,757

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    When we retired, at 65 years plus, we wanted to be near the water. At our age, and you will be our age some day, there are were three other assets that were important for us; a good library, a YMCA, and a nearby hospital. We have used all three.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
    Posts
    18,744

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Dale, check your private messages, please...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    568

    Default Re: Nova Scotia

    Good morning, Michael,

    That is weird, I responded to your PM shortly after you sent it to me. I just checked my sent folder and it's not there. I am just heading back to the coast and will send you another one later today or tomorrow.

    Sorry about that !

    Dale
    \"The strength of a man is not measured on what he must have, it\'s measured on what he can do without\"

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