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Thread: SCAMP envy/lust

  1. #1506
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    I have started a blog- "The Voyage of Southern Cross" pertaining to my coming small boat voyage through Tierra del Fuego. Should anyone here be interested it is at:
    http://thepocketyacht.blogspot.com

    Todays posting is: Provisioning

  2. #1507
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    For those who are interested there is a new video of Howard talking about Southern Cross, his SCAMP, posted on the Below 40 south website WWW.below40south.com. Just go to the site and click on Photos and videos and click on "answering questions at the bow". There are a number of videos about Southern Cross in that section of the website.

  3. #1508
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Howard Rice has added a new post to his blog Voyage of Southern Cross. As usual it's inspirational and informative. You find a great video of SCAMP testing there as well.
    https://youtu.be/du9lvJNVqnk

  4. #1509
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    http://thepocketyacht.blogspot.com
    Quote Originally Posted by David Nichols View Post
    Howard Rice has added a new post to his blog Voyage of Southern Cross. As usual it's inspirational and informative. You find a great video of SCAMP testing there as well.
    https://youtu.be/du9lvJNVqnk

  5. #1510
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust









    High level of finish.

    http://craigdbryant.weebly.com/scamp...chives/09-2015

    Perky looking boat from every angle.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 05-27-2017 at 02:45 AM.

  6. #1511
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Looks great! WOW

    I like the choice of colors too!
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  7. #1512
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    From The Strait of Magellan
    My voyaging SCAMP #2 Southern Cross is headed back to the US in a few weeks. She is currently crated and likely under snow about fifty yards off the shore of the Strait of Magellan just as she came out of the southern ocean after I rescued her.
    She is headed to Seattle and then Port Townsend where she will join me at the Northwest Woodenboat Festival (as is) the weekend of September 8th-10th. I am one of this years featured presenters and look forward to presenting film, stills, a few stories and answering questions about my experiences voyaging south down the Strait of Magellan and into the Southwest Island of Tierra del Fuego. It was a fulfilling yet very difficult voyage. I long to be back there.



    G][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]

    [IMG][/IMG]

    The James Caird in the back ground.

  8. #1513
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Craig
    A high bar finish, well done. You should feel great and now its time to give her a scrape or two!
    Quote Originally Posted by donald branscom View Post
    Looks great! WOW

    I like the choice of colors too!

  9. #1514
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Wow, whos version of the James Caird is that, and whats it doing there,do you know?

  10. #1515
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Wow, whos version of the James Caird is that, and whats it doing there,do you know?
    http://www.archive.jamescairdsociety...ews-107710.htm
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  11. #1516
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust


    next time Howard goes back there, right beside the Caird, will be a replica of Southern Cross complete with life sized crew figure and dramatic retelling with video footage of the harrowing experience!

    certainly an inspiration for future adventures and adventurers

  12. #1517
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Thanks, thats a new one i was not aware of. Been a few recreations this past decade, thought it might have been one of those cast off.....

  13. #1518
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    From The Strait of Magellan
    My voyaging SCAMP #2 Southern Cross is headed back to the US in a few weeks. [Snip!]
    It was a fulfilling yet very difficult voyage. I long to be back there.
    Congratulations, Howard, on having survived your adventure. I won't be able to make it to Port Townsend, but I look forward to hearing more as you are able to publish.

    All the best.

  14. #1519
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Well there won't be a life sized figure in the boat but a replica Southern Cross will be there. The Museum is building an exact replica for display....................as strange and surreal as this sounds. I in no manner feel my voyage is deserving of this but they do, go figure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    next time Howard goes back there, right beside the Caird, will be a replica of Southern Cross complete with life sized crew figure and dramatic retelling with video footage of the harrowing experience!

    certainly an inspiration for future adventures and adventurers

  15. #1520
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    Well there won't be a life sized figure in the boat but a replica Southern Cross will be there. The Museum is building an exact replica for display....................as strange and surreal as this sounds. I in no manner feel my voyage is deserving of this but they do, go figure.

    very cool, how many people here have a museum exhibit inspired by their exploits!
    are you donating your now famous dry suit? it could be worn by the life like manequin... also maybe a representative collection of ships stores and survival gear you used during the night on tough luck island. This display could be inspiring generations of young adventurers to explore who knows where!
    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 05-31-2017 at 09:57 PM.

  16. #1521
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    ^ Funny as the above sounds, that life size manequin in a drysuit sounds like a good thing, seeing as it sounds like it kept you alive, it might help pass on a message of how important some gear is in survival conditions.

  17. #1522
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    I think the whole museum thing is just plain weird and misdirected but they did photograph my boat in great detail and they have the builder skilled enough to do it. Manequin? I doubt this would happen. The dry suit I keep on using, it is an amazing piece of gear and ready to go. My boat is in process now for a leg 2 voyage and series of adventures, I'll need the suit.
    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    ^ Funny as the above sounds, that life size manequin in a drysuit sounds like a good thing, seeing as it sounds like it kept you alive, it might help pass on a message of how important some gear is in survival conditions.

  18. #1523
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust


    A vid clip taken just down the beach from the museum where I launched and prepared. This is voyage departure morning, breezy. It was a most challenging first day under way.

  19. #1524
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Howard, I would love to hear comparisons between your previous trip in a Klepper folding kayak and your trip in Scamp / capabilities and strengths of each boat. I've done a fair bit of kayaking in wildish places, have often thought, wondered if you could get around those same places in a small sailboat, always concluded that I was much better off in a sea kayak with the ability to sneak along whichever shore was more protected, fight directly to windward rather than tacking, ability to land in all sorts of places and sit out extreme conditions on shore.

    I'm curious, if you had to re-create either trip, would going again in a Klepper Aerius/other sea kayak or your Scamp cause you less trepidation?

  20. #1525
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    I think the whole museum thing is just plain weird and misdirected but they did photograph my boat in great detail and they have the builder skilled enough to do it. Manequin? I doubt this would happen. The dry suit I keep on using, it is an amazing piece of gear and ready to go. My boat is in process now for a leg 2 voyage and series of adventures, I'll need the suit.

    prolly best to keep on the good side o the Museum folks! you'd hate for your exhibit to turn into a cautionary tale for local school children about "un Gringo Loco" and his misadventures Below 40 South!


    meanwhile I'm enjoying your beach vid, some strong wind there, what sail combinations were you using that day? also scrutineering your mast boot, almost time to sew one of those myself.

  21. #1526
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    I like how there's a giant rusty tanker just to leeward of your launch point. "Ahem, excuse me sir, would you mind moving your ship just a bit?"

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  22. #1527
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon1 View Post
    I like how there's a giant rusty tanker just to leeward of your launch point. "Ahem, excuse me sir, would you mind moving your ship just a bit?"

    Mike
    That ship is a derelict just sitting on the bottom, she formed a very effective breakwater. Useful as although the prevailing wind is offshore there, it does blow the other way sometimes and its open water for 20 plus miles so the seas can build up somewhat.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  23. #1528
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    The museum manager/owners are my friends and totally wowed by my boat and voyage. My interest is to keep the superlatives at bay but I really have no control over anything they do. It will all be positive I know that much. Interesting how my voyage played out in Chile. Never a disparaging or negative word, the opposite has been true. I constantly heard people who came to photograph the boat or to meet me say how inspired they were and how well thought out my boat was plus how much they admired the fact I was setting out sailing in such a cold challenging place. Same held true but even more so after I returned to Punta Arenas. It was almost embarrassing to have people I didn't know approach me plus John and Patricia Cano in Punta Arenas with handshakes, photo requests, etc

    The sail setting choice that day was single reefed main, genoa and reefed mizzen. It was down wind sail and what a day it turned out to be.
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post

    prolly best to keep on the good side o the Museum folks! you'd hate for your exhibit to turn into a cautionary tale for local school children about "un Gringo Loco" and his misadventures Below 40 South!


    meanwhile I'm enjoying your beach vid, some strong wind there, what sail combinations were you using that day? also scrutineering your mast boot, almost time to sew one of those myself.

  24. #1529
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Hi Ian
    All of your observations below are right. I chose a small sail and oar boat for a number of reasons. The primary reason was comfort. I found 3 1/2 months solo in Tierra del Fuego including a double rounding of cape For in a 15 foot folding sail kayak to be incredibly uncomfortable but effective for the reasons you mention.

    This round I wanted to have a two month supply of food, wanted shelter aboard the boat as one thing I discovered on my first voyage is that suitable even barely usable tent sites on land are few. I mean the land is so rugged and wet that getting a tent up and staking it down was a near impossibility most days. I spent several nights aboard my sailing canoe including four days and three nights in open ocean. Not that much fun.

    The other issue with the kayak was down wind in high winds and big waves, I believe you might appreciate the situation. This is sketchy stuff for skinny boats and I faced this condition much of the voyage.

    The issue with the 12 foot boat was two fold.
    1. Kelp. As reported to me by the Armada de Chile. Their recent hydrographic study shows an increase of up to 60% in kelp outgrowth in the past 15 years. Virtually every anchorage I had pre plotted did not work out. I was therefore in trouble every day searching for any safety.

    2. The known fact of not being able to easily pull my boat on to shore. The kelp clogged anchorage situation made this a serious issue.

    If I had to do the voyage again in one or the other boat I would pick the 12 sailing boat over the sailing kayak. I would plot a different course and make some gear modifications but not much. I would love to sail the region again but likely won't, moving on to other sailing aboard my little ship.

    Quote Originally Posted by IanHowick View Post
    Howard, I would love to hear comparisons between your previous trip in a Klepper folding kayak and your trip in Scamp / capabilities and strengths of each boat. I've done a fair bit of kayaking in wildish places, have often thought, wondered if you could get around those same places in a small sailboat, always concluded that I was much better off in a sea kayak with the ability to sneak along whichever shore was more protected, fight directly to windward rather than tacking, ability to land in all sorts of places and sit out extreme conditions on shore.

    I'm curious, if you had to re-create either trip, would going again in a Klepper Aerius/other sea kayak or your Scamp cause you less trepidation?

  25. #1530
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Howard, I have NO knowledge of kelp, I live in the sub tropics..... but would it be strong enough for a Scamp to moor to?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  26. #1531
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Below 40 South has a new progress report posted on the cockpit tent of Southern Cross
    http://below40south.com/progress-report-13/

  27. #1532
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Thinking about the type of boat for this area (Southern Chile) it seems to me that a boat such as Southern Cross may have disadvantages. Considering the Kelp problem, If you go in a Kayak there is the possibility of hauling up on the shore. If you go in a larger boat and have a dinghy of some sort you can tie lines ashore as well as anchor. This is the classic way of surviving in those places. If you can neither tie to the shore or haul up on the beach you are left with anchoring by itself which can be difficult.One can only conclude that although a great little boat a Scamp is not at its best in this situation. I appreciate that this is a controversial point of view.

  28. #1533
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Howard has done the kayak thing down there. He has spoken about this, having sleeping accommodations on board was an important improvement. I wonder if perhaps a small motor might have enabled him to get further into the protected bays behind the kelp. Rowing is very limited power on a boat with that much wind-age. I also wonder if having the mast (main mast at least) in a tabernacle, and normally dropped horizontal at night at anchor might have handled the wind and conditions a little better. In the video he refers to the boat tacking back and forth while at anchor. The tent seems to be a success.

  29. #1534
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    Hi Ian
    All of your observations below are right. I chose a small sail and oar boat for a number of reasons. The primary reason was comfort. I found 3 1/2 months solo in Tierra del Fuego including a double rounding of cape For in a 15 foot folding sail kayak to be incredibly uncomfortable but effective for the reasons you mention.

    This round I wanted to have a two month supply of food, wanted shelter aboard the boat as one thing I discovered on my first voyage is that suitable even barely usable tent sites on land are few. I mean the land is so rugged and wet that getting a tent up and staking it down was a near impossibility most days. I spent several nights aboard my sailing canoe including four days and three nights in open ocean. Not that much fun.

    The other issue with the kayak was down wind in high winds and big waves, I believe you might appreciate the situation. This is sketchy stuff for skinny boats and I faced this condition much of the voyage.

    The issue with the 12 foot boat was two fold.
    1. Kelp. As reported to me by the Armada de Chile. Their recent hydrographic study shows an increase of up to 60% in kelp outgrowth in the past 15 years. Virtually every anchorage I had pre plotted did not work out. I was therefore in trouble every day searching for any safety.

    2. The known fact of not being able to easily pull my boat on to shore. The kelp clogged anchorage situation made this a serious issue.

    If I had to do the voyage again in one or the other boat I would pick the 12 sailing boat over the sailing kayak. I would plot a different course and make some gear modifications but not much. I would love to sail the region again but likely won't, moving on to other sailing aboard my little ship.
    Thanks for the very informative reply, Howard. I think it should be realised / remembered how extraordinarily well Scamp did work down there, comfortable little cabin and the ability to carry several months supplies and make progress in such an extreme environment. You can anticipate and plan and react to a difficult situation with a great amount of skill and effort, but some things will always remain beyond your control, if they all stack up together you can be in trouble and need a even more luck, effort and good management to get out of it.

    I think the analogy with mountain climbing and avalanches is a good one - you can be the most experienced and skilful person in the world, and do everything possible to anticipate and manage the risk but still get hammered because there's a lot you can't know and can't control.

    Ian

  30. #1535
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Haven't seen much on the condition of the little Scamp after the return home. I am very curious about any damage she may have from the trip.... the cross, and the salvage.
    I too suffer from envy/lust of the Little Scamp and wonder about how well the structure held up to the stress.
    Scotty

  31. #1536
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Chipsahoy View Post
    Haven't seen much on the condition of the little Scamp after the return home. I am very curious about any damage she may have from the trip.... the cross, and the salvage.
    I too suffer from envy/lust of the Little Scamp and wonder about how well the structure held up to the stress.
    Scotty
    One cleat pulled out while they were hauling her aboard the Cano brothers fishing boat, and there were a few scratches in her paintwork while they did that. Other than that, no damage, she could have been bailed out and sailed away.

    An interesting thought, she was anchored when the "Tromba Marina" flipped her, three times, and its quite on the cards that leaky hatches saved her. The fact that she had water in the compartmentalised interior allowed her to settle into the water while lying on her side meant that gusts of wind didnt move her around as much as she would have if dry inside, so she hadnt been driven ashore. The big Northill anchor and heavy rode was a factor as well.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  32. #1537
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    That is good news, thank you very much for the reply.
    I've seen a few aircraft that were being recovered, frequently more damage was done during the recovery than was caused by the initial incident.
    Several of us contributed to her final recovery and I'm sure they are as curious.
    Is she now home? And if so, where would her home port be now?

    Scotty

  33. #1538
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Chipsahoy View Post
    That is good news, thank you very much for the reply.
    I've seen a few aircraft that were being recovered, frequently more damage was done during the recovery than was caused by the initial incident.
    Several of us contributed to her final recovery and I'm sure they are as curious.
    Is she now home? And if so, where would her home port be now?

    Scotty
    She's in Port Townsend, you could say that she's relaxing among friends. Preparations are being made to start this project https://www.voysc.com/ . That will see her travel far and wide, it should be a pretty amazing adventure for all involved.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  34. #1539
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    I have a question for John Welsford:
    Have you ever calculated the volume of the various watertight chambers in a standard SCAMP?

    I have signed PUFFIN (SCAMP #197) up for the 2018 Small Reach Regatta, a low key get-together for small craft in Maine. One of the questions they ask about new boats in the event is their flotation in case of capsize. I did a cursory survey and estimated the volume at 30 cubic feet.
    I wonder if you have come up with a more accurate figure?
    I posted this question on the Small Craft Advisor forum and a friend over there suggested I try here.

  35. #1540
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    Default Re: SCAMP envy/lust

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Hazard View Post
    I have a question for John Welsford:
    Have you ever calculated the volume of the various watertight chambers in a standard SCAMP?

    I have signed PUFFIN (SCAMP #197) up for the 2018 Small Reach Regatta, a low key get-together for small craft in Maine. One of the questions they ask about new boats in the event is their flotation in case of capsize. I did a cursory survey and estimated the volume at 30 cubic feet.
    I wonder if you have come up with a more accurate figure?
    I posted this question on the Small Craft Advisor forum and a friend over there suggested I try here.
    I did a rough calculation for an EC certification certificate s while back and came up with 0.82 cubic metres which is very close to your estimate. In any case, with the woodwork its not far off a ton of lift.

    Have fun at Small Reach,

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

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