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Thread: Wooden deck and Line-X?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Seattle, WA
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    This may sound crazy, but I would like to know what you think about applying Line-X to the deck of my tug boat?
    I am trying to find a water proof non-skid solution and I have read they use Line-X on the decks of USN submarines, so why not a 64 year old tug boat?
    BTW - The deck is made of douglas fir.

    Thank you,
    C. D. Hunter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    Did a quick check of the Line-X website, the FAQ's indicate that it'll stick to "any properly prepared surface". So, the question I'd ask the Line-X home office (not a franchisee) is "How do I properly prepare a wooden substrate for Line-X application?"

  3. #3
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    Dec 2001
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    Discovery Bay, Jamaica, WI
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    I like this stuff. A lot of metal boat owners use it to preotect / quiet / insulate their hulls. It is expensive, and you don't even want to think about removing it - it sticks.

    I expect that you will have to figure out a way to isolate the coating from any water invasion in the deck substrate. They do apply it over painted surfaces, and it can be laid on pretty thick.

  4. #4

    Post

    I would think if you epoxy sealed the deck (cpes) that would stabilize the deck surface pretty well. I must admit that after selling this product in the car business, I was REALLY impressed with it. It's tough as hell.

  5. #5
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    Jan 2000
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    Egg Harbor Twp, NJ
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    Is this the same stuff they spray on pick-up truck beds?

  6. #6
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    Dec 2001
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    Discovery Bay, Jamaica, WI
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    Yep. Same stuff. Comes in colors, to!

    I am prepping my trailer and Landcruiser for Line-X treatment to protect the lower quarter panels from gravel, dirt, etc. while running on bad roads.

    There are some DIY products (Herculiner is one) that can be rolled or brushed on, but I believe that Line-X is the premium product. Probably a lot better than the deck paint with granulated walnut hulls that I used to slather on the deck of the troller.

    JM

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
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    Passage Maker magazine did a piece on someone tearing out old leaky teak decks over spongy plywood. They repaired the plywood where needed, then epoxy and cloth with minimal fairing, then hired a guy to come out and spray this stuff on. It looked to be a good fix for a very common problem.

    I also recall an artical (in Passage Maker again) about one of Sam Devlins beautiful trawler yachts getting this same material shot in all lockers and storage bins as a finish thats easy to maintain and to keep things in place when underway.

    Its on my list of things to try...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Raleigh NC
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    I build small plywood fishing boats (creek boats and small Johns) and coat the interiors with Rhino which is very similar to Line-x. Line-x is a harder material. The important thing is to seal the wood (epoxy) then scuff the surface to give a tooth for the stuff to stick to. It'll be a good surface for what you're wanting.

  9. #9
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    Simmons18,
    Does Rhino come in colors and is it a spray product or brush on? Thanks..

  10. #10
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    Feb 2005
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    Raleigh NC
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    Mike
    Rhino does come in a few colors but they cost more and fade more redily. It is sprayed on in a booth under controled conditions by well suited/masked/skilled applicators. And it can be pricy. Some dealer can go moble. Get with your local dealer and ask about preparation that you can do that will make the job less expensive. It should be sprayed quite a bit thinner in boats than in a truck bed and that will help the price. Al in all though it's good stuff.

  11. #11
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    Jan 2000
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    Thanks Simmons, would like to try it on the deck boards of my engine room, just removed the batteries and and the deck boards are removable so, this would be a good as place as any...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Grosse Pointe Woods, MI
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    Montana Boatbuilders http://www.montanaboatbuilders.com/d...s_recurve.htm# puts LineX on the bottoms of all its driftboats, which are made for bouncing over boulders in Montana trout rivers. I had LineX applied to the bottom of the driftboat I built to Montana Boatbuilders plans a couple of years ago, and I can testify that it is tough stuff. I have dragged the boat over gravel bars when the Michigan rivers run low in August, and I've pulled it up textured concrete boat ramps. So far, nothing has left a mark on it. The bottom of my boat is 5/8 Douglas fir, with a layer of glass and several coats of epoxy. I roughed the bottom with 40 grit sandpaper for better adhesion before they sprayed the LineX. If you put it on the bottom, find somebody who can spray it smooth, so it doesn't hang up on rocks or have unneccessary drag. There have been several LineX discussion threads on the Montana Boatbuilders builders' forum.

  13. #13
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    May 2004
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    Seattle, WA
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    My thanks to all of you for the feedback.

    C. D. Hunter

  14. #14
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    Apr 2012
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    Poughkeepsie NY Hudson Valley
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    Default Re: Wooden deck and Line-X?

    I wonder how this or the stuff on TV would do as a bottom coat on old carvelle woodies?

  15. #15
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    Apr 1999
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    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
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    Default Re: Wooden deck and Line-X?

    Quote Originally Posted by GARRBOSR View Post
    I wonder how this or the stuff on TV would do as a bottom coat on old carvelle woodies?
    You mean the spray in a can on the screen door ad? That would be a whole lot of spray cans to do a wood hull. $$$
    Notice that they gloss over how many cans it took to cover the screen door....
    "Now and then we had a hope that if we lived and were good, God would permit us to be pirates." ~ Mark Twain


  16. #16

    Default Re: Wooden deck and Line-X?

    The USN and a couple towing companies that I have dealt with ( Mickey Class ) applied PRC deck overlayment to laid and caulked fir decks. The PRC compound was originally formulated for planked wooden decks where Non-Sparking features were mandatory. This product was tenacious and would stick to a well greased frying pan but after a number of years became a nightmare. The USN and Foss forgot or never knew that a laid and caulked deck is a major transverse stiffener that depends entirely on being set up hard on the seams to create a rigid bridge from one side of the hull to the other. Cover it in goop and forget the necessary regular maintenance of hardening seams from time to time and eventually you end up with a slack deck that will throw off wonder goo like a bad hair piece. If she is a real tug with real laid decks they are structural and not just a roof to keep water out of your bunk.

  17. #17
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    Apr 2012
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    Poughkeepsie NY Hudson Valley
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    Default Re: Wooden deck and Line-X?

    nah I was thinkin just the below the water line seams, its flexible enough,, I wonder, also wonder if this will set of another Hot Zone ?? lol

  18. #18
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    Jun 2012
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    Middle River, MD
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    Default Re: Wooden deck and Line-X?



    This is a plywood skiff that I put together. All of the coatings visable (black and tan) are Line-X followed by a coat of "Line-X Plus". The Line-X plus is a clear coat applied over the base coat. It adds a bit of luster, fills some of the voids in the rough line-x surface and adds additional layers of protection. The deck, and sides were applied over fiberglass and vinylester resin. The insides and covering boards were applied over resin treated plywood. The product is extremely durable and has proved very easy to clean. The boat is used a a general utility skiff and hauls all sorts of "rough" gear that tears paint jobs to pieces. The line-x has not suffered any damage. It is also very comfortable on bare feet. The downside is the cost. It is not cheap.

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