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Thread: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

  1. #36
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    What application?

    Its been used in boatbuilding.
    Fish and ships or is that chips

  2. #37
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    The application used in this thread, boat building. As brittle as the live limbs are, I would expect the lumber to be a poor choice in a spot that might be subject pounding from waves, floating objects, or unseen rocks or sand bars.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    SASSAFRAS
    Sassafras albidum

    Common Names
    Black Ash, Golden Elm, Cinnamon Wood, Common Sassafras, File-Gumbo, Red Sassafras, Sassafrasso, Saxifrax, , Smelling-Stick, Wah-en-nah-kas, White Sassafras

    History
    Essential oil distilled from the root-bark or the fruit is used to make safrole, tea and as a fragrance in perfumes and soaps, food and for aromatherapy. The shoots are used to make root beer, which owes its characteristic odor to the sassafras extract. The leaves are used for thickening sauces and soups, and when dried and ground are known as filé powder, a spice used in Cajun, Creole, and other Louisiana cooking, such as the dish filé gumbo.

    Did You Know?
    Sir Walter Raleigh took sassafras back to England from Virginia. In what were called the Great Sassafras Hunts from 1602-1603, ships were sent from England to collect the roots. Sassafras roots then were converted into a tonic that smelled like root beer and supposedly kept its drinkers youthful and healthy. Sassafras was also used as dye to give fabric an orange tint.

    Distribution
    Sassafras is native to North America from Maine through Ontario, Michigan, Indiana, Iowa, and Kansas, to Florida and Texas. Average tree height is 30' to 60'

    Main Uses
    The wood of sassafras is used in the manufacture of furniture, interior and exterior joinery, windows, doors and door frames , kitchen cabinets and paneling. It is a preferred wood used in boat building and fence posts.

    Relative Abundance
    Together, aspen, basswood, cottonwood, elm, gum, hackberry, sassafras, sycamore and willow represent 12.5 percent of commercially available U.S. hardwoods.

    General Description
    Sassafras heartwood is pale brown to orange brown, resembling ash or chestnut. The narrow sapwood is yellowish white. The wood has a coarse texture and is generally straight grained. Well known as an aromatic species.
    Sassafras is very resistant to heartwood decay, in exposed damp conditions however, the sapwood is liable to attack by powder post beetle.

    Availability
    Extremely Limited.
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Thanks for the scientific reference.

    Sassafras is very nice to work with, smells good, and is half the price of clear Doug Fir here in Michigan.

    The battens I'm using to take the plank shapes are 3/8 x 3/4 sassafras, spliced to 25' length. They have been flipped and flopped around a lot in the planking process and are very limber, not brittle at all.

    PS, whiskey plank is coming soon, hopefully next week. I'll post some pics when the planking is complete. So far I've got about 700 hours into the build.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  5. #40
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Nice one Denny,keep at it. Cheers

  6. #41
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Finally finished the planking. My pair of 4 x 24 scarfed together sheets were just enough, only had a couple of inches of scrap left over. The panel expansions in Freeship predicted this but I was sceptical.





    Each strake has two coats of epoxy sanded to 120 on both sides. A lot easier to do it flat on the bench than chasing the inevitable runs from epoxy coating vertical surfaces. Slow going, though, as each pair of planks took almost a week to cut, finish and install. The two batten, hot glued stick method (see post #20) to pick up the strake patterns worked great. Much easier than making luaun patterns for each strake as I did on the Arctic Tern.

    On to laminating a 1/4" layer of Sapele to the transom today.
    Last edited by mcdenny; 05-01-2012 at 10:08 AM.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  7. #42
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Slow going?
    If one subscribes to the "perfection IS speed" school of thought, you're zooming.
    I love it.
    A boatless inlander, searching for the meaning of life-aground.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    The boat building progress had been pitifully slow of late but I can show you the final layer of 1/4" Sapele laminated onto the transom. The grain match is not that great but it is better than it looks in this flash photo. I saved the better stock for the deck.



    I've also got the outer stem and keel on and about half of the epoxy fillet sanded smooth (kinda). My son is visiting this week so I'm hoping to get the xynole on the bottom with his help.

    Here's why the boat progress is so slow.


    We got a little travel trailer 3 weeks ago and of course, even though it's brand new, I have to redo the electrical system, rebuild the beds and add a closet. The boat is pretty much on hold until I get the trailer done.
    Last edited by mcdenny; 06-05-2012 at 09:37 PM.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  9. #44

    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    I love this boat. I think it would make an awesome great lakes boat for down riggin for trout and salmon. How much hp are you planning on punning on her?

  10. #45
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    It is for the Great Lakes, at least for the St Clair river part. She will have a 60 hp Evinrude ETEC engine. Since it is a two cyl design the power head is relatively low and will fit entirely under the flush aft deck. 60 hp should give about 30 mph at WOT.

    Someone here posted data recently about his Atkin Ninigret, very similar in size and shape to my boat and about 300 lbs heavier. He reported 32 mph with the 60 hp ETEC.

    Denny Wolfe
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  11. #46
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Looking good Denny,transom looks fine.Keep at it. Cheers

  12. #47
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Glad to see the fine work done so far,Denny. At the rate you plow through the boat work, the trailer must be all done by now surely. Looking forward to your return toward the work left on the boat.



    Cheers!

    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  13. #48
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    Thanks, Peter, but building cabinets in the trailer is a lot like fitting the interior in a boat, everything but the floor curves in three dimensions and it's only sorta symmetrical. Bottom line, it seems to take forever to make much apparent progress. Sadly the boat has become a shelf to pile trailer crap on.

    Denny Wolfe
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  14. #49
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Fair enough Denny. I've no doubt your thread followers will be patient and eagerly await the sweet conclusion to this fine boat. Good luck with the trailer!


    Cheers!



    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Hi, Denny

    Very interesting boat and very nice work. Since you mentioned Lake St. Clair, I'm assuming you're somewhere north of Detroit (I grew up in the former East Detroit, now laughingly called "East Pointe"), but I'm down here in the southeast corner of the state, in Monroe, renovating a Folkboat.

    Your trailer interests me; could you tell me who the manufacturer is, dimensions, and most important to the female of the combo, if it has a head?

    Thanks.
    "When fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in the flag and carry a bible" - Sinclair Lewis

  16. #51
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    LES, I'm 50 miles NE of Detroit in Marine City on the St Clair River. The trailer is a Lil Snoozy ( I know, what a dumb name) http://www.lilsnoozy.com/. That link has all the info.

    It does have a tiny bathroom, where the toilet takes a shower along with you.

    Here is a fiberglass trailer forum with lots of relevant info: http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/

    BTW: there is a fiberglass trailer rally scheduled for the weekend after Labor Day in Algonac State Park with at least a dozen similer trailers planning to attend. Only 1.5 hours from Monroe if you want to check them out. Check the thread on fiberglassrv.com
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  17. #52
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    It's been three months but finally the trailer and other honeydo projects are out of the way and I can get back to the boat.

    Put down Xynole on half the bottom yesterday:









    Xynole is so soft and pliable - way easier to lay over a curved surface than fiberglass.

    3 hours and 5 quarts of epoxy later:







    continued...
    Last edited by mcdenny; 08-16-2012 at 08:19 AM.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  18. #53
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Six hours later the cure state was just right (Raka 127/350 at about 80 degrees F) to trim the excess cloth with a razor blade:














    A little touch up sanding on the keel edge of the cloth and on to covering the other side.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  19. #54
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Looking good. Is there much difference between xynole and dynel for the purpose of sheathing?

  20. #55
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    I have used both , can't tell the difference.both are amazing

  21. #56
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    I've not tried Dynel but I think they are pretty similar too.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  22. #57
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Thanks Whizz and Denny,I have been meaning to place an order with Jamestown Dist. as its not availiable in europe. Still undecided as the amount of epoxy it soaks up, may outweigh its abrasion resitance quality in favour of a lightwight glass cloth, for a boat launched and recovered on a trailer,not being dragged over rocks.

  23. #58
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    Tom Lathrop's data shows 0.36 lbs of epoxy per square foot of 4 oz Xynole cloth. That's the stick-it-down coat plus two fill coats. That's a lot of epoxy but I think that's why the abrasion resistance is so good.

    Denny Wolfe
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  24. #59
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    Another months progress:

    Two coats Interlux epoxy prime kote, one coat pre-kote, first coat Brightsides ocean blue on bottom, one coat primekkote, one coat prekote, one coat brightsides black on sides:






    The bottom (when floating) edge of the boot stripe is the Freeship predicted waterline. The top edge is the waterline 2 1/4 inches deeper from the transom to amidships, then gradually trending to 3" at the stem. I'm trying this instead of the usual method as the stripe is vertical on the aft side strake and very forward bow but at a very shallow angle in the middle of the boat. This looks weird now looking down on the inverted hull but will give the right appearance looking at the boat horizontally, like when its floating some distance away.

    This pic shows it at its weirdest, the stripe is about a foot wide where it transitions across the chine flat:



    I was going to use my cheezy laser level and a camera tripod to mark the lines but that was turning out to be a huge hassle so I made a marking jig that let me mark waterlines a fixed distance up from the top of the ladder frame. It worked fine and was ultra simple to do.

    Here's the jig on the ladder frame:



    And the top of the jig being used to mark the water line:



    I went around marking one line, then cut 2 1/4" off the stick and went around again marking the second line.

    The bottom 4' level is just being used as a rigid straight edge, the top 2' level is held level to make the mark on the hull. Eyeballing the bubble's "centeredness" certainly creates some variation but you can fiddle with the masking tape a bit to get a smooth looking line and this is definitely a place where the 'if it looks right, it is right' rule applies.

    On to more sanding and two more coats of finish color, then the big roll-over.
    Last edited by mcdenny; 09-15-2012 at 09:16 PM.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  25. #60
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Looking good Denny. Looks like you will defo need a pair of sunglasses when she gets rolled out the shed!

  26. #61
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Looking really good Denny. Hope I get to take a ride in it.
    Tom L

  27. #62
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    handsome boat!

  28. #63
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    That paint job looks shmick, well done

  29. #64
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    Good thing you all can't see the dust in the gloss. Today I'm going to switch to wet sanding and paint fresh from a new can.

    Denny Wolfe
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  30. #65
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Keep up the posts! Great boat and helpful ideas to use for my own project.

  31. #66
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    Finally Flipped!

    After a month away I got back to painting the boot stripe and fitting bunks on the used aluminum trailer I got via craigslist last spring. This morning was the big flip.

    Here's the boat ready to turn over:




    Here's the structure I built to let me lift the boat from an eye in the ceiling and then rotate the hull 180 degrees: You can't see the forward attachment but it is bolted to the motor board through the holes that will ultimately take the outboard's mounting bolts.



    Half way there:





    The white rope you can just see at the bottom of the picture wraps around the hull and is led through an eye on the other wall of the shop. The boats CG is above the pivot axis so it wants to flop over as soon as it is lifted up. The rope restrains that and the boat slowly rotates as the rope is payed out.

    Ta da!


    Next I'll slide the trailer under her and adjust the bunks. Normally I wouldn't put the boat on the trailer until it is almost done as it is easier to climb in and out if it is sitting lower on the floor. In this case I want to get the trailer out of the yard and be able to move the boat out of the shop temporarily if the need arises.

    After that its lots more sanding to clean up the epoxy drips, globs, etc and get the interior bottom ready for epoxy and paint and the interior sides ready for varnish.

    So far 784 hours, maybe half done. I'm glad this is fun as I'll probably not run the boat 1500 hours in my lifetime.
    Last edited by mcdenny; 10-26-2012 at 10:27 PM.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  32. #67
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Looking good, Denny. We tried something similar to your Rube Goldberg rope contraption when flipping the hull on our 15' Macomber Skiff. Ended up dislocating my wife's thumb. From now on, I use machinery or lots of big dudes and beer and swearing.

    I haven't forgotten about your CAD project, but the wife and I decided to sell the house and build anew, which has my priorities out of whack. Will touch base with you about it another time.

  33. #68
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    Another update - detailing the table that magically rises out of the sole.

    We often have a picnic dinner while putting down the river. Currently I have a 16" x 48" folding Formica/ aluminum table meant for an RV. It works OK but is kind of a pain to set-up and put away. My inner McGuyver dictated my new design have a table that rises from the floor and retracts with the flip of a switch. Here's a 15 sec video of the final result:

    http://youtu.be/AF9Qga-2Jfk

    The drive mechanism is a 2000# (smallest available) ATV winch on sale at Harbor Freight $59, including wiring harness and switch. The slides are epoxy coated drawer slides.









    Denny Wolfe
    Last edited by mcdenny; 12-04-2012 at 09:29 PM.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  34. #69
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    Excellent!
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: New Design - 22' Powerboat - abuildin'

    I love this more every time I read this thread!
    A boatless inlander, searching for the meaning of life-aground.

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