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Thread: Egg harbor 37 sedan cruiser lightly built?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Newport News, VA
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    2,018

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    Just curious as to where the lightly built part is on these boats.

    frames are white oak, 1.5 thick by 2 wide
    frames on 9 inch centers
    planks are 4/4 mahogany
    floors are white oak 2 inch thick and ~9 inches or so high and run pretty wide across spaced every 18 inches

    Of course everyone talks about the frames breaking in the stern area.

    Frames socketed into keel, floors drifted into keelson which is ~7 inches wide
    Bottom keel deadwood is ~5 inches wide and fairly deep to protect the props and skegs.

    Transom was a poor design with plywood inner which rotted
    I am curious is it in the frames or planking where the lightly built part is thought?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
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    12,583

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    Some things get those reputations ... Egg Harbor

    biggest thing I've seen on them is the bending of the frames ... that's where they tend to break ... vs. sawn.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK US
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    8,304

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    Many bent frames are damaged but not broken when they are installed. If you are having problems, I would consider that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Coldwater, Ontario, Canada
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    1,115

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    I've looked at a few Chris-Craft woodies while they were opened up, and they look pretty skinny too. Plywood and a few stringers - ok when they're new, but no room for error when the rot sets in.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Seattle area, Washington State
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    2,825

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    The main problem with the Eggs is that there aren't enough bulkheads to keep the bottom from pumping, putting excessive stress on the frames at the chines. It's too long a run from the transom to the cabin bulkhead. The frames in the aft third are the first to go, then being weakened, it progresses further forward with time until the aft 2/3 break.

    Adding a full structural bulkhead at the forward end on the cockpit and a few other partial bulkheads in between makes it a whole different boat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
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    10,030

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    If you're alongside in a good seaway, you can SEE such boats flex...

    Alan

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Newport News, VA
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    Hi Conrad,
    "Adding a full structural bulkhead at the forward end on the cockpit and a few other partial bulkheads in between makes it a whole different boat. "

    Would this go somewhere between the transom and the rear cabin bulkhead in the Lazarette area?

    I currently have a 6500 watt Mcck Onan gen set in there.
    I count 2 full bulkheads on the boat, first where the cabin doors are set in and second at the front of the engines dividing the lower cabin from the upper cabin.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Newport News, VA
    Posts
    2,018

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    actually the cabin door bulkhead is set about a foot forward of the where the sliding cabin doors are located. There is a fresh water tank sitting right next to the bulkhead at the extreme front end of the lazarette. It is about 12 inches wide.
    I am currently going to pull the boat in July to pull some screws around the board ends and butt blocks and may end up rescrewing the underwater planks. I have a small leak at the stem which runs the bilge pump every 30 minutes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Seattle area, Washington State
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    2,825

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    It's about 18' from the transom to the main cabin bulkhead. I've relocated the bulkhead at the forward end of the lazerette to the 9' point, which in my boat puts it right under the cabin doors. I made it heavier (2 sheets of 1/2" ply laminated together) and carried it out to the hull sides where it fits tightly on top of the appropriate frame. The main bulkhead as also been beefed up, and now fits tightly against and supports a frame. Additional Short bulkheads (30") were also fitted in the stern, about 4' forward from the transom, again tied to frames.

    Check all your butt blocks below the water line- for whatever reason every last one of mine was questionable. I think the issue is that since the hulls work so much all the fastenings work in their holes and get loose.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Location
    Baltimore Maryland
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    8,708

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    Oh boy, obviously some people don't know the wooden Egg. Bottom pumping??? I repaired a bunch when I had my shop, have owned 2 and currently own a 1966 37 Convertable.This hull was designed for good preformance in ocean swells,and I can attest to the preformance. The ribs tend to break at the turn of the bilge in the aft 2/3s of the boat.They were just sressed a bit too much. After a good laminated repair, you can expect no future troubles.Yes replacing the butt blocks is a good idea,they split with age. I used epoxy encapsulated ply as replacements. The hull is strong. Keep water from leaking topsides, and the Egg will give long service.

    [ 06-26-2004, 11:46 PM: Message edited by: Bob Adams ]

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