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Thread: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

  1. #1
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    Default PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    I wanted to bring this topic up again, but slant the discussion towards full displacement power boats.

    I haven't been able to be nearly as active towards building a boat for this trip for lots of reasons, but it looks like that will be changing. The wife says I need to get busy doing something fun. I don't want to disappoint the wife so I am going to decide on a plan and purchase.

    After doing more research/reading I am starting to think that the most realistic way to do this trip would be in a boat with a motor and a cabin. I am leaning towards a full displacement hull for the efficiency and the whole point is to enjoy the trip/surroundings and take it all in. I have thought about semi displacement or a planing hull, but I am not absolutely sure about this, what do you think?

    I am looking at boats in the 17'-22' range, full displacement, OB or IB Diesel (not sure yet, but OB would be easier), inside steering station, being able to steer outside the cabin would be nice also, basic accommodations.............a place to sit/sleep/eat/heat up some food/store my stuff and all while out of the rain. I also am thinking some way to heat the cabin would be most beneficial.

    Here are some plans I am looking at, any and all comments are most welcome. I want to hear what you guys think about these designs for this type of trip. If you know of other designs please post them.


    Of course I really like the larger designs, but I am still trying to go smaller if it makes sense and has what I need.

    Tad Roberts designs

    18' North Coast Troller
    http://www.tadroberts.ca/services/sm...coasttroller18

    Timbercoast 22
    http://www.bartenderboats.com/images...t 6-9-2009.pdf
    http://www.bartenderboats.com/design.html

    Sam Devlin Designs

    Litl Coot (motor sailer)
    http://store.devlinboat.com/litl_coot.aspx

    Dipper 19
    http://store.devlinboat.com/dipper19.aspx

    Dunlin 22 (semi displacement but maybe it will still perform with a smaller motor at displacement speeds)
    http://store.devlinboat.com/dunlin22pilot.aspx

    Others...

    Gartside #74 (probably too much boat to build, but I will list it since it is such a nice design)
    http://store.gartsideboats.com/colle...ifer-design-74

    Hartley Fisherman 18
    http://www.hartley-boats.com/fisher18.html

    That's all I have for now.
    Last edited by High Altitude; 09-22-2011 at 10:07 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Hi there

    I'm not sure if you have seen the smaller Dipper 17 also from Sam Devlin, if you want to go even smaller? There is a blog here of a guy building one, although his site has been quiet for a while now. It will give you a good idea of what you can expect.

    http://aboatbuildingjournal.com/


    Regards!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Just to add to the decision

    From Bateau.com

    HMD19: http://bateau.com/studyplans/HMD19_study.htm?prod=HMD19

    MM21: http://bateau.com/studyplans/MM21_study.htm?prod=MM21

    MT24: http://bateau.com/studyplans/MT24_study.htm?prod=MT24

    There are countless good choices out there, you juat gotta find the one that is right for you and a large part of that decision is personal, ie what "feels" right. I don't know those waters at all so I won't make any kind of recommendation though, just adding ideas.

    George
    George

  4. #4

    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    As a radical alternative you could consider my plywood Skoota 20 power catamaran.

    We recently motored to Princess Louisa inlet from Saturna island. Two people on board. Average speed 10 knots, averaged 9mpg. Longest non stop was Pender Harbor to Saturna. That's with a 25hp outboard.

    You can see more on the Latest News page of my website (scroll down the page)

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Paul Fisher's Rufus 22 is another to consider:

    Last edited by JimD; 09-22-2011 at 10:26 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    There are shorter versions of Rufus, too


  7. #7
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard of Woods Designs View Post
    As a radical alternative you could consider my plywood Skoota 20 power catamaran.

    We recently motored to Princess Louisa inlet from Saturna island. Two people on board. Average speed 10 knots, averaged 9mpg. Longest non stop was Pender Harbor to Saturna. That's with a 25hp outboard.

    You can see more on the Latest News page of my website (scroll down the page)

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
    Very handy looking boat, Richard. Looks extremely stable:




  8. #8
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Having twice owned the 17' Dipper pictured on Sam's site (It is currently in Homer, AK.) and having done the Gulf of Alaska and Inside Passage (Olympia- Seward and Seward to Ketchikan) in a full displacement troller (which cruised at 7.7 kts), I would not recommend the Dipper 17 for the Inside Passage. With a hi-thrust 9.9 Yamaha, it tops out at 6.5 kts. and really cruises more in the 5-6 kt. range. With the Dipper's limited fuel range, currents you will encounter, crossing of open passages, etc., the Dipper 17 is just not the boat for it. I've had it out in 4-5 foot seas and that was the most I would have wanted to have her out in. She did fine and she did fine in our daily 3 footers we get every afternoon in Resurrection Bay but that is really her limits. Thinking of the rapids of the Inside Passage that I've gone through, you would have some very narrow windows in which to get a Dipper through in a timely manner. The Dipper 19 may have stronger possibilities, with the additional power of the twin 9.9's or 15's, if you are thinking of that version.

    I would have no problem taking a 22' Surf Scoter up the Passage and I think the Dunlin would also do well. I am on my second Scoter (the first one I sold to a couple who are using it out of Seldovia, AK), which is the last Scoter that Sam built, and she is sweet. I wouldn't hesitate to do the Inside Passage with her. I was really impressed with the Black Crown 29 that accompanied us on the first leg of our '05 trip (Olympia - Ketchikan). She handled everything well.

    Just some thoughts...Have fun reviewing all your options! :-)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    I'm familiar with the territory, having traversed the passages from Vancouver as far as Port Hardy hundreds of times and from Vancouver north to the Alaska border several dozen times with many side trips to the Queen Charlotte's. With modern chart plotters and mini-radars the open water passages (Queen Charlotte Sound and Dixon Entrance) are far less scary than they used to be. The reality is there are usually sheltered pockets close at hand to hide out in (especially with a small boat). When I was doing it we were always on a schedule (running 24 hours a day) and it was lots of work to find shelter with nothing but a chart, compass, and depth sounder. Anyway the passage from Seattle to Skagway is entirely doable in a small cruiser. If one needed to do it in 3 weeks or a month one of Richard's Cats would be the way to go, if you can accept the modern styling. Some want a more traditional look and for them it's a planing or displacement mono-hull.

    The TimberCoast 22 is close to the ideal size for a singlehander living aboard for a full summer. She's big enough to have a double berth (for occasional guests), a decent woodstove (Navigator Sardine), tiny galley, a really good helm seat with 360 degree vision, and a cockpit for fishing, lounging, and safely deploying the paravanes should that occasion arise. But 3500 pounds of boat is a substantial outlay in materials and construction hours. Unless you are really dedicated she will require more than a year (perhaps much more) of labour.

    So we look for something smaller and simpler (quicker) to build. A retired fellow here on Gabriola approached me about the minimum boat for a northern BC coast cruise. He grew up on a mission boat visiting all the out of the way spots upcoast, and he hopes to revisit these places in his own small cruiser. He is experienced at building small open boats and at first we discussed him building a Pogy 17 motorsailer (lapstrake plywood). But he decided he would really like to try strip planking and he has a strong interest in traditional BC boats. Thus we turned to the little 18' double-ender, styled after a BC coast Japanese gillnetter of about 1935. For this project we'll modify the boat slightly with an outboard engine in a well forward of the small transom. A transom is added to simplify the build, eliminating the need to bend the strips around to meet a sternpost. He plans to start construction later this fall.
    ___________________________________
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    A lot depends on what level of comfort you want. My father in law went from Gig Harbor, WA to SE Alaska in the fifties in a largely open hand troller.
    The cure for everything is salt water - sweat, tears, or the sea
    Isak Dinesen

  11. #11
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    ... we turned to the little 18' double-ender, styled after a BC coast Japanese gillnetter of about 1935. ... He plans to start construction later this fall.
    Those Japanese double enders are among my favourite designs. Not many around anymore.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Is this design that you are talking about the 18' North Coast Troller? I like the looks of this design and it uses an outboard which I prefer for this particular build. Does the cabin of the North Coast Troller have standing room or is it sitting room only?

    What about the possibility of using an outboard on the Timbercoast 22 to simplify the build and open up the cabin?



    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    But he decided he would really like to try strip planking and he has a strong interest in traditional BC boats. Thus we turned to the little 18' double-ender, styled after a BC coast Japanese gillnetter of about 1935. For this project we'll modify the boat slightly with an outboard engine in a well forward of the small transom. A transom is added to simplify the build, eliminating the need to bend the strips around to meet a sternpost. He plans to start construction later this fall.
    Last edited by High Altitude; 09-22-2011 at 10:07 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    The Flying bridge is the best vantage point for traveling and looking.
    Binocular's stashed up there, a chart or two, Drinks, wet gear, all under a little light Canopy of canvas.

    The Double ender is great when your steaming along at Six kts and the weather is following you at 12 Kts.

    I always wanted, but never had....a good big reclining relaxing chair for the nicest part of the day.
    Anchor set, dinner made, winds calm, weather nice, and in my recliner with my coffee enjoying nature and wondering what else there needs to be.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    High A....

    I did two different boats to start with, the heavier 18'6" inboard powered gillnetter type was draw a year or two ago, and this is called the Double-Ender 18 on my website. More recently I did the West Coast Troller styled NorthCoast 18, which is lighter displacement and shallower draft using outboard power. That's the boat we'll be modifying slightly with a different (small transom) stern.

    There are some subtle shape diferences in these two types that may not be obvious at first glance. The Gillnetter is a fuller shape and has a blunter entry and exit, also flatter topsides. The troller has flair forward and a rather fine stern, overall an easier driven shape that will ride better in a sea. The gillnetter will carry a bigger load.

    Both these boats have about 5'6" headroom in the pilothouse. That's probably about what it was originally in these boats built by tiny Japanese fishermen. It's very easy to create a top heavy look in a small boat by trying to gain full standing headroom. As Phil Bolger said, "if you want headroom, go on deck."

    The new stern will be based on that of this boat, Eva. This is from Western Mariner magazine......



    The addition of an outboard well to the already complex build of a TimberCoast Troller 22 would be a big change. It's possible but it would be up to Bartender Boats to commission a design change which seems unlikely at this time.
    ___________________________________
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Tad, thanks for the info.

    I agree that trying to get standing headroom in too small of a boat can absolutely ruin its looks.

    OK guys, this is what I am looking for.

    Full displacement hull design, 9.9hp high thrust OB on the back or in a well, standing room closed cabin but only has to be big enough for a very basic galley/storage setup, V berth with portapotti underneath with enough headroom to use it, stitch and glue or plywood on frames construction prefered.

    Designs that fit.

    Bateau's Mini Maia 21 (not sure about the looks)
    http://www.bateau.com/studyplans/MM2....htm?prod=MM21



    Hartley's Fisherman 18 (not sure if it has standing headroom in the cabin)
    http://www.hartley-boats.com/fisher18.html



    Even though Devlin's Dipper 19 is a semi-displacement hull it is really close.






    What I really want is something like Devlin's Chinook 21 (plans not available), the top one with the full cabin, but with an OB. Just a basic full displacement hull w/basic cabin that looks nice.





    Any suggestions?
    Last edited by High Altitude; 09-23-2011 at 02:10 PM.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    I guess I could always go out and purchase a used Ranger Tugs 21ec, but I am pretty set on building.




  17. #17
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser


  18. #18
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    I live at the very north end of the inside passage and have been considering building this boat:

    http://www.boatplans.dk/boat_plans.asp?id=36

    I
    t is not the prettiest boat but it looks simple and functional.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    It is a pretty boat, and useful too.
    Store your buoys, crab pots, shrimp traps up top, along with the "Long line" and something to store the Cleaned Fish in.

    I'd sure consider making the bottom of 1" yellow Cedar. You could spend a summer gathering the floating logs.
    I think you also have access to a large amount of wood from the National forests which would help.

    You know what your Beaches are like. A Plywood boat would die an ugly death in a short time up that way.
    Another thought might be to build the boat as planned, then make a 'bottom skin' of the 1" wood which would be removable when it gets too scratched up.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard of Woods Designs View Post
    As a radical alternative you could consider my plywood Skoota 20 power catamaran.

    We recently motored to Princess Louisa inlet from Saturna island. Two people on board. Average speed 10 knots, averaged 9mpg. Longest non stop was Pender Harbor to Saturna. That's with a 25hp outboard.

    You can see more on the Latest News page of my website (scroll down the page)

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
    That looks like a great boat. I would like to inquire about the outboard though. I had a much larger sailing catamaran with a centrally mounted (aft middle of the bridge deck) 60hp high thrust outboard. I had much trouble with the outboard prop losing its grip on the water in even moderately rough seas. A plate on the outboard's cavitation plate helped a lot but the problem would still appear with certain wave/wind angles. How have you avoided this problem with your Skoota design?

  21. #21

    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    You are right to be concerned about aeration of a central outboard

    I made a wedge shaped fairing about 500mm long and 100mm wide that extended down to the WL and was a reasonably tight fit to the front of the leg. Tapered at the leading edge to deflect flotsam

    You can see photos on my website and in the videos. The best are probably on my Latest News page, but it is almost visible in the stern photo above

    It makes a huge difference. As an experiment we took the fairing off. The maximum speed went from 15 knots to 6 and even then the engine was awash. We quickly put it back on!

    Hope that helps

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  22. #22
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    LOL, that Ranger 21 with a bow thruster, but it's nice. Hmmm, maybe if I get some PVC drain pipe, an old trolling motor, then take it apart and ....oh well, I don't think I need one really.

    Does skoota use those hulls for storage? I don't see any access Richard.

  23. #23

    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Yes it does. The photos above were taken on launch day. Since then we have fitted the hull hatches. The hatch is big enough for a 4hp outboard plus fuel tank and tools. I guess you could also use it as a fish hold

    A more recent photo showing the cockpit tent, hull hatch etc is on my Latest News page, scroll down to September

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com

  24. #24
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    I like it. Very simple and functional. Build it out in a work boat finish and I could see this boat lasting many, many years doing everything you ask of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fritz Koschmann View Post
    I live at the very north end of the inside passage and have been considering building this boat:

    http://www.boatplans.dk/boat_plans.asp?id=36

    I
    t is not the prettiest boat but it looks simple and functional.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    The line of Hankinson/Sorensen tugs are worth a look, too, plans available on the Glen-L site:

    Goliath 18.5:



    Glen-L's Bo Jest 18


  26. #26
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Apparently only Sam Devlin takes the accommodation seriously, the rest of these guys expect their designs to be built by midgets with no feet.......The vee berth on the Maia looks barely possible for a small dog......The vee berth cannot be 6' long and end at the stem, that's not useable by normal sized adult people today. Bunks need to be 6'6" long and at least 20" wide from the head to well below hip length, then they can taper to 12" wide at the foot. This requires bunks with a forward end well aft of the stem. Despite wishful thinking people do not shrink with the size of their boats.......
    ___________________________________
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  27. #27
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    From the MM21 study plans:

    The dinette converts to a bunk 70" long and 28" wide ( 178 x 71 cm). The vee berth is 73" long by 68" wide ( 185 x 173 cm), 84" long along the diagonal ( 213 cm).
    I know someone building one currently, I'll ask him to measure and verify that the study plans are correct, but I'd bet they are. On the other hand, I agree with you that the majority of designs I see out there are laughable when it comes to berths. My Dad is looking to build a smal cruiser for my Mom and him to possibly do the loop, or at least portions of it and he's 6'7" tall. He doesn't want a giant boat just for the two of them, but every small boat he comes across is just not designed for large people.

    BTW Tad, you have some great designs that hsould be on the table for the OP too

    George
    George

  28. #28
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    While trying to decide on a plan I wanted to get everybody's opinion on a tender.

    I was thinking either tow one or go with a folding dinghy design. I don't want to take an inflatable. I want something quick to use. I am going to take along a 2-3hp OB as emergency power and to use with the dinghy.

    For a folding design I would use the origami folding dinghy.

    http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/be...gami/index.htm



    It has no problem using an OB.



    If I decide to tow a dinghy, well the skys the limit, I am sure everyone has their favorite design. I would still use a dinghy on the smaller side though.

    What do you guys think? folding or tow?

  29. #29
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    TR Makes a good point about 'no feet' as I've never had a boat with room under anything for your feet. Where ever a person stood up close to any closet in the boat, he'd have have his feet turned to the side.
    "Kick board" I think its called in the kitchen drawings of a house.

    You designers get busy and make that a feature in your next effort.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Cruising in the PNW in a small boat offers many anchorages where you have a reasonable depth of water right up to the shore. The usual method in small boats is to "Clothesline" moor on an endless line run through blocks on an anchor and shore. This allows freedom of movement ashore while the boats stays afloat and off the beach. Simple and no dinghy required. But there will be times when you want to explore tidal lagoons or river mouths or estuaries where a tiny boat is required. If singlehanding I would just have a sit-on-top plastic kayak which is nothing to tow or lift into the cockpit. And a kayak can be fun to go exploring with. An outboard for the dinghy for a 18'-20' cruiser is more trouble than it's worth, but if you want a nasty folding boat I guess it's impossible to row. The alternative is a tiny pram that could be pulled into the cockpit in a tough spot or long crossing. But they aren't much fun to row either, and so limit exploring.....

    Here's clothesline moorage at Wallace Island.......



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  31. #31
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Actually the "no feet" remark was aimed at berths that come to point....well my feet are size 13 and there's two of em.....they need space, and if they don't get it I am some cranky in the morning. I do applaud those who admit their bunks are less than 6' long, but I can only shake my head at Ranger tugs where they craftily pile pillows in the bow bunk so you can't see there's no foot room up there.....Also "Full Headroom" to me means 6'4" minimum under the beams....I rarely see that.....Billy Atkin thought full headroom was 5'10" under the beams....but he was a little guy.......
    ___________________________________
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    cat ketch Ratty
    http://www.tadroberts.ca
    http://blog.tadroberts.ca/
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  32. #32
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    I noticed this also. If the measurement is to the tip of the berth against the stem, you might as well subtract a foot or so to come to the actual useable length.

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    Actually the "no feet" remark was aimed at berths that come to point....well my feet are size 13 and there's two of em.....they need space, and if they don't get it I am some cranky in the morning. I do applaud those who admit their bunks are less than 6' long, but I can only shake my head at Ranger tugs where they craftily pile pillows in the bow bunk so you can't see there's no foot room up there.....Also "Full Headroom" to me means 6'4" minimum under the beams....I rarely see that.....Billy Atkin thought full headroom was 5'10" under the beams....but he was a little guy.......

  33. #33
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Looks like a nice design and I have no doubt it would be completely functional and do everything I need, but I am not really sold on the rounded transom/tug boat look.

    It is starting to look like I am going to have to make some compromises since there isn't one plan out there that really has exactly what I am looking for.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    The line of Hankinson/Sorensen tugs are worth a look, too, plans available on the Glen-L site:

    Goliath 18.5:



    Glen-L's Bo Jest 18


  34. #34
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    The addition of an outboard well to the already complex build of a TimberCoast Troller 22 would be a big change.
    Tad,

    What do you mean by saying the Timbercoast Troller 22 is a "complex build"? Is it a difficult design to build?

  35. #35
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by High Altitude View Post
    Looks like a nice design and I have no doubt it would be completely functional and do everything I need, but I am not really sold on the rounded transom/tug boat look.

    It is starting to look like I am going to have to make some compromises since there isn't one plan out there that really has exactly what I am looking for.
    Bo Jest has neither a rounded transom or a tug look, and recommended power is only 10 hp. Also, with this and many of these boats you can take considerable liberties with cabin design. Twer it me, I would likely go for Paul Fisher's Rufus 22 with a soft dodger style cabin for the rear cockpit. Sam Devlin's Dunlin is extraordinarily good looking, but seems to prefer a considerably larger power plant.

  36. #36
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Hi Jim,
    As a relative neighbour, Heriot Bay, Quadra Island, I thought I'd mention the boat that I am currently building as a contender for this category: namely my Glen-L 'HERCULES" semi-displacement trawler. I hope to be launching in 2012.
    Graham

  37. #37
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Mackay View Post
    Hi Jim,
    As a relative neighbour, Heriot Bay, Quadra Island, I thought I'd mention the boat that I am currently building as a contender for this category: namely my Glen-L 'HERCULES" semi-displacement trawler. I hope to be launching in 2012.
    Graham
    Graham, that's quite a project. Cathy (Mrs JimD) and I might make it up to Quadra sometime late fall, early winter, depending on how things go.

    One version of a Hercules:


  38. #38
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by High Altitude View Post
    Tad,

    What do you mean by saying the Timbercoast Troller 22 is a "complex build"? Is it a difficult design to build?
    Every boat is a complex build, but it depends what you're used to. To a good level of finish the TimberCoast 22 will require 2-3000 man hours of construction labour, probably three times the hours required to build a stitch-n-tape 18'.

    To build the TimberCoast......(short version)

    1) No lofting required
    2) Build the strong back
    3) cut out and erect the ply bulkheads
    4) laminate stem & stern post and erect.
    5) laminate inner keel, deadwood and shaft log and erect.
    6) Install chine log and sheer clamp
    7) Install longitudinal stringers.
    8) Fair the frame
    9) scarf and install bottom and topside ply sheathing
    10) Sheath entire hull with dynel or glass cloth
    11) Fair again
    12) prime
    13) paint
    14) turn upright
    15) Remove strongback
    16) Tape bulkheads to hull sheathing
    17) install floors and engine beds
    18) prime and paint

    That's 20% of the construction completed. Now you have sole and deck framing, sheathing with ply and glass of same, trunk cabin, trunk top, pilothouse, PH top, windows and door, interior, tanks, systems (electrical and plumbing), engine installation, steering, rigging and spars, exterior trim, deck fittings....and so on.
    ___________________________________
    Tad
    cogge ketch Blackfish
    cat ketch Ratty
    http://www.tadroberts.ca
    http://blog.tadroberts.ca/
    http://www.passagemakerlite.com

  39. #39
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    I am a huge Devlin fan, and of the designs you picked for yourself I like the litl coot best. You don't mention the budget but I would think that design would cost quite a bit to build. CMD Yachts has some nice designs and the standard 18 Redwing was always one of my favorites. http://www.cmdboats.com/rw18.htm?car...2c90dec49d846b Although they have other suitable designs for what you have in mind.

  40. #40
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Doing some quick scaling of another boat I came up with a 19'6" by 7'6" full displacement boat with full headroom (6'3" minimum). This boat gets decent sole width only 2" above the hull bottom because there is a central flat strake (dory style, but this is no dory). By having the cabin sole as low as possible we keep the boat from looking too tall and ungainly(IMO).

    ___________________________________
    Tad
    cogge ketch Blackfish
    cat ketch Ratty
    http://www.tadroberts.ca
    http://blog.tadroberts.ca/
    http://www.passagemakerlite.com

  41. #41
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Would that sole be high enough to provide room for plumbing or does it run along the sides? Looks good!

    What would the power requirements be for that design Tad?

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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Wavewacker View Post
    Would that sole be high enough to provide room for plumbing or does it run along the sides? Looks good!

    What would the power requirements be for that design Tad?
    Typically the water tank (should there be one) will be under the berth which extends from about where our intrepid crewman is standing to about 2.5' aft of the tip of the stem. What the heck let's make the berth 7' long. The aft section under the berth will have the pottie on center and storage P&S. Next forward will be a 20 gallon plastic water tank. If I was flush I would build in two stock (ronco type) plastic fuel tanks under the cockpit sole. That would give one lots of capacity for truly long range, they could be anywhere from 10 to 30 gallons.

    At any rate the plumbing from water tank to sink will be well above sole and a direct connection through the bulkhead. Other than a bilge pump pickup there should be nothing in the bilge.

    For power I'm suggesting 8HP as the minimum, and the Yamaha 8HP High-Thrust as a decent choice. Beyond that I'll say about 25HP is the max but about 15HP is the most she can use and that is mostly digging a hole. 6.5 knots is about as fast as she'll efficiently cruise.
    ___________________________________
    Tad
    cogge ketch Blackfish
    cat ketch Ratty
    http://www.tadroberts.ca
    http://blog.tadroberts.ca/
    http://www.passagemakerlite.com

  43. #43
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Has no one mentioned Blue Jacket Boats? Worth a look!
    http://www.bluejacketboats.com/

  44. #44
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by stephenlneal View Post
    Has no one mentioned Blue Jacket Boats? Worth a look!
    http://www.bluejacketboats.com/
    It has been mentioned in other threads, but we are mostly talking about full (some semi) displacement hulls in this thread.

    Looks like a great design though.

  45. #45
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Do you have to build?
    You say you prefer larger designs.
    Here is a 30' Monk for sale, with a great big easy chair to sit in in case your engine goes kaput and you have to wait for a tow.
    Only five large as Tony would say.
    http://victoria.en.craigslist.ca/boa/2613144289.html
    Last edited by goodbasil; 09-26-2011 at 03:42 AM.
    basil

  46. #46
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    After thinking about this more, I am going to stay with the idea of building something basic, a minimum cruiser in a backpacker's traveling style.


    I think Bateau's HMD19 will work out. Has everything I need, nothing more, and is a proven 500hr build. Very basic and straight forward.

    http://www.bateau.com/studyplans/HMD...htm?prod=HMD19





    Last edited by High Altitude; 09-26-2011 at 12:07 PM.

  47. #47
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    That'll work!

  48. #48
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Nice boat but it won't be much easier to build than a Devlin Dipper 19 which would probably be a better choice for a trip like the Inside Passage.

  49. #49
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    Nice boat but it won't be much easier to build than a Devlin Dipper 19 which would probably be a better choice for a trip like the Inside Passage.
    The boats are very similar. The Dipper 19 uses a semi-displacement hull with 2 outboards and the HMD19 is a full displacement hull with a single OB.

    I think actual cruising speed will be about the same, but you could push the Dipper 19 faster if you want to and don't mind the extra noise and fuel burn.

    You can build the HMD19 with the same enclosed pilot house with standing headroom by dropping the sole in the pilot house (like the dipper 19) and adding the full bulkhead/door on the back of it.

    Bateau will have faster/more accessible online build support, but Devlin support is just as good and only a phone call away/also answers emails.

    It's close, both are nice designs.
    Last edited by High Altitude; 09-26-2011 at 07:44 PM.

  50. #50
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    Default Re: PNW Inside Passage - small full displacement power cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by High Altitude View Post
    Bateau will have faster/more accessible online build support, but Devlin support is just as good and only a phone call away/also answers emails.

    It's close, both are nice designs.
    I'd think twice before I committed to a project of that size based on plans from Bateau. A forumite who builds boats for a living once built a Bateau design for a customer, and he reported in the forum was not impressed with the plans. I'd have MUCH more faith in a set of plans from Sam Devlin.

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