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Thread: Plan for 15- 16 foot runabout

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2

    Default Plan for 15- 16 foot runabout

    In an issue of Popular Mechanics published in the 1963/64 period, there was an article on building a 15 to 16 foot runabout powered by a 50HP outboard. That was a lot of power for an outboard back then. I have been looking for that plan and/or copy of the magazine which contained that article. It was probably an issue published in 1963, perhaps in the months April, May, june, or July but am not certain.

    The runabout design was unusual in that its bottom had two small sponsons which helped allowing higher speed.

    If anyone knows about this article or where that plan or copy of that issue of Popular Mechanics can be obtained please let me know.

    My E-Mail is holew1@mac.com
    Charlie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    9,396

    Default Re: Plan for 15- 16 foot runabout

    1956 (pretty close) was the year Mercury introduced its 50 ci 4 cyl engine. A whole bunch of boats came out then to utilise this motor.
    By 1963, the 4 cyl 50 hp was big, but not the biggest. They had a 6 cyl by then. "Tower of Power"
    Sounds like the "sponsons" make it a hydroplane, not a runabout.
    This is a 1956 Aristo Craft Torpedo, made possible by that Merc.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Posts
    60

    Default Re: Plan for 15- 16 foot runabout

    Take a look at http://www.svensons.com/boats/ Just for the record a 50 hp outboard wasn't considered big in 64, Johnson had a 75 and Merc had the 100. A production outboard runabout that would go over 50 mph was real fast. I had a 13' Allison with a 50 Merc that I raced in APBA, it was fast but nothing compared to the Switzer flying wings with 2 100 Mercs (about 100 mph with racing lower units.)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Plan for 15- 16 foot runabout

    Thanks WIZBANG for your reply. I did look at Glen-L boat plans today and found several boats which might meet my needs. the Glen-L runabouts have an interesting and very strong method of building the hull. The ribs are covered with strips of plywood which are 1/8" thick, 4 layers thick which are laid on the bias to each other and are glued with epoxy. This makes for an very strong hull which is nearly rot proof. Also using these thin narrow plywood stripes which are 2 to 3 inches wide, there is no need to resort to steaming to get the strips to follow the contours of the hull.

    I was hoping to use that technique in building the boat I saw in Popular Mechanics.

    Thanks again for your reply. Your boat look great!

    Charlie2011

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