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Thread: Door skins

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
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    St. Simon\'s Island, GA, USA
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    Default Door skins

    I am in the early stages of building the 19 ft Ohio sharpie. I just made my first scarf, two ten foot lengths of cypress 1x2 for the chin logs. Lets us hope it stays together when I bend it over the frames.

    I am thinking ahead to the cockpit combings and wales. I want then to be bright. I have been wondering about butting and laminating door skins. I went to the big orange box today. They have what they call underlayment which is 5 mm thick, and three ply. The two outer plys are luan (Philippine mahogany?) about 1 mm thick and the center ply is something else, maybe.

    Will this stuff stand up without delaminating? The combings and the wales are not important for strength. I would laminate two or three layers of this stuff.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Cool, Ca in the Sierra Foothills
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    727

    Default Re: Door skins

    Very trashy wood in my opinion. I bought some to make patterns from and it was very brittle and barely stood up to handling. It does not bend well either and it would not surprise me if it delaminated in high humidity much less in the water in a boat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Southern NH
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    Default Re: Door skins

    The quality used to be OK (20 odd years ago), but now the flooring guys I know won't even use it for underlayment. Run away! I doubt it would take a good finish anyway.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    Portland, Oregon
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    Default Re: Door skins

    The biggest problem with that 3-ply material - for your use - is it likely won't bend without cracking and breaking. If it does so, it likely won't be fair. I'd skip to a 1/8" mdf or another plywood, with more plies.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  5. #5

    Default Re: Door skins

    That underlayment is not phillipine mahogany, it is a plantation grown species that is a cousin of the mahogany, but not a true mahogany. It is worth every cent of the nine buck a sheet they charge.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
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    Wellesley, MA USA
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    8,835

    Default Re: Door skins

    Unless it's enclosed in five times its value in epoxy, it'll rot before your eyes.
    Useful only for patterns and such.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Everett, WA
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    13,180

    Default Re: Door skins

    Pattern use only, concur.

    ...or, to skin cheap-o doors in trailers. ;-)
    Gerard>
    Everett, WA

    Il colore del cielo, la forza del mare.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    West Newbury, Mass
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    836

    Default Re: Door skins

    I agree with all the above. It's OK for making patterns, but nothing else.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    Default Re: Door skins

    Oops... I didn't read carefully enough. I was thinking you were going to use the door skins for patterns in order to not waste better plywood. My comment about 1/8" MDF is hereby retracted <yikes!>
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    3,240

    Default Re: Door skins

    I built a 6 hour canoe out from doorskins in '04. It's still fine. No rot, no delamination, nothing. It's not great stuff, but it's worked for my cheap canoe

  11. #11
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    Jun 2003
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    Seabeck, WA
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    Default Re: Door skins



    When I made this 3-board door 10 years ago from tight-grained, quartersawn Western Red Cedar, I was concerned that my choice of coves tapering to 1/4" tongues was a bit fragile. So I lammed the door section backs with luan doorskin from Home Depot to see how it would hold up, knowingly violating convention on at least two counts...warpage and rot resistance.



    I took the risk because the door was made from planking rip waste and scraps...high-end, stable, wood but no big loss...and I saturated the thin, 3-lam doorskin thoroughly with epoxy.

    The door has been in service over 10 years without a hint of a problem.



    Hot epoxy makes up for a number of sins..
    Last edited by Bob Smalser; 08-28-2011 at 11:17 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Sidney, BC , Canada
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    158

    Default Re: Door skins

    I recently purchased some of these so call "door skins" with the idea of laminating them onto some 3/4 Doug. fir panels for the interior stateroom doors. Initially the project was looking good until I went to put a finish on them. I still do not know exactly what it is but every panel has areas where there is some sort of "bleed thru" that has turned the water based stain a nasty yellow color instead of the dark mahogany that I used. I have sanded them down again and done trial finishes but with no success so now I have painted doors. Even using "Zinser Bulls Eye" stain covering primer it took 2 coats to stop this "bleed thru" so dawd knows what they must have used as a glue. It is not anything I have done to the "skins" as I used epoxy as a glue and even tried using a solvent based stain all with the same result.
    I am not real happy that the doors ended up painted but the cost of mahogany plywood has caused me to live with it.
    I would not trust this material for anything approaching structural because of fears of delamination.

    John "MV Penta"
    Sidney, BC

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Cool, Ca in the Sierra Foothills
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    Default Re: Door skins

    Quote Originally Posted by J. A.Tones View Post
    I would not trust this material for anything approaching structural because of fears of delamination.John "MV Penta"Sidney, BC
    I agree 100% i don't think this is the same material that Bob is refferring to as his is 10 years old. I used to buy door skin ply that i used for pattern material in the past but the stuff big box is selling now is not the same thing.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
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    7,304

    Default Re: Door skins

    I use door skins for patterns in my work due to its being economical as well as easy to work with. It can be cut with tin snips or a Japanese pull saw and cobbled to gether with hot glue and a stapler. But, in truth, I was raised in a boat building family with the concept that a well built boat should last for fifty years or more when put together using traditional materials and construction methods. To date, I can humbly say that nothing I have built since I first went into the business has either sunk, delaminated, rotted or harmed anyone either physicaly or financially. Since I am so, firmly locked into traditon, I tend to shy away from materials that do not have a track record for longevity. For this reason, I choose not to use materials that, to my own thinking, are questionable as to quality or longevity is concerned. Plywood in all cases is not my favorite material to use so far as quality construction or long lasting service is concerned. I am very allergic to the laminate glues, hate horsing a sheet of ply around to cut it to shape and curse the manufacturer when ever I am forced to plane the edge grain and find voids that need filling! While I bloody well hate plywood, I must confess that I have entered grand stand contests using plywood and Sikaflex as a quick fix method of construction. Our boats didn't sink but they didn't last long either. So, in closing my own opinion of door skins and other forms of plywood in boat building is that it is a financial crap shoot if you don't mind dealing with delamination or dry rot sometime down the line. And that is a problem that always seems to come when it is most inconvenient to deal with!
    Jay

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    SE Mich
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    Default Re: Door skins

    I built a 12' canoe from doorskins and (not much) epoxy. Used once a year, rotted hanging in my garage.
    Denny Wolfe
    www.wolfEboats.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Sturgis MI
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    536

    Default Re: Door skins

    I would go buy one sheet of sepele or okoume plywood and use it for those coamings. or you could steam some local white oak or ash if you care about the "Ohio" aspect of the project. I think ash would look nice, epoxy it and then varnish. If you want to finish bright then you should buy the best materials IMO.

    Jerry

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