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Thread: Wood for deck

  1. #1
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    Default Wood for deck

    I'm getting close to putting the decks on the Coquina. I'd like to use a very light colored wood for the decks to contrast with the sassafras seats, oiled floorboards and dark green hull.I'll be varnishing the decks after two coats of epoxy. Anybody use Eastern White pine? I've got some Atlantic white Cedar left, but it's got more knots than I would like.The plans call for butternut, among other woods but this was a bit dark for my taste.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    I have seen western red cedar be very red and very yellow, sometimes in the same plank. Might be a good choice, or if you can get it, alaska cedar.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    Butter Nut is a wood that Nathanial Herreshoff often used for interior joinery because of it's lightness and resemblence to teak or mahogany depending on what stain is used. However, it is not a good wood to use for external work due to its, some what low resistance to rot. Both Eastern white pine and Atlantic cedar are excellent woods to use for decking. Another wood, Alaskan Yellow Cedar is an excellent wood for decking as well. Strong, light in weight and highly rot resistant, it can often be found here on the West Coast at reasonable prices. I would stay away from red cedar as a choice for decking as it is very prone to damage by abrasion as well as it will be very easy to dent if anything is dropped on it. It is a very light wood and, for that reason, is often used for small boat planking in the Pacific North West. My own concerns with Western Red Cedar are due to the fact that it is brittle, splits easily and has very low resistance to shock. I have a Herreshoff pram in my shop, currently, that is made of Western Red Cedar that has some five planks that are in need of replacement due to splitting along the fastening lines as well as right down the center.
    Jay

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Reynard38 View Post
    I'll be varnishing the decks after two coats of epoxy.
    For what it's worth this is the worst thing you can do to your boat and yourself. Put a bit of water on a varnished deck and you will have the best ice skating area to fall overboard. It is not seaworthy at all, more for the show off people that never go out sailing...
    http://www.peacefuljourney.ca/
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    Vertical-grain Douglas Fir makes a fine traditional deck with a teak oil finish. Plus it is inexpensive.

    The very best logs are reserved for long 2X12's. I've marked off how these 20-footers will generally produce two, nice VG, 6/4 deck boards per stick of lumber...all for well under 90 cents a board foot locally. The price break is generally at 18', where longer gets more expensive. But that's plenty long for even big-boat decks.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    Quote Originally Posted by JoshuaIII View Post
    For what it's worth this is the worst thing you can do to your boat and yourself. Put a bit of water on a varnished deck and you will have the best ice skating area to fall overboard. It is not seaworthy at all, more for the show off people that never go out sailing...
    Agreed, but the decks on the Coquina are tiny, and you'd never be walking on them. They are 5" wide side decks and the deck aft of the mizzen.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    The Eastern white pine is interesting as I've been using woods that are native to GA. It does have a small range along then northern part of the state in the mountains.
    Last edited by Reynard38; 08-28-2011 at 09:07 AM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Smalser View Post
    Vertical-grain Douglas Fir makes a fine traditional deck with a teak oil finish. Plus it is inexpensive.The very best logs are reserved for long 2X12's. I've marked off how these 20-footers will generally produce two, nice VG, 6/4 deck boards per stick of lumber...all for well under 90 cents a board foot locally. The price break is generally at 18', where longer gets more expensive. But that's plenty long for even big-boat decks.
    That is some nice looking wood. I wish that grew here! Even my specialty yards and mill don't seem to get any DF.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Wood for deck

    Clear spruce is another possibility--often used for house trim--

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    I talked to the sawmill that supplied my juniper (aka Atlantic white cedar). He's going to see if he can cut enough clear
    Stock for my needs.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    I was going to suggest the yellow cedar that is cut here in BC. I dont know what you have locally that compares but my whole boat is planked in Yellow Cedar and it has stood up for a bit over 60 years nicely. The Decks are also Yellow Cedar but I am not sure what shape they are in as the previous owner has covered them in plywood and Glass. from the underside they look to be in fantastic shape still.
    Freudian slips : when you say one thing but mean your mother.

  12. #12
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    Sep 2002
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    Petaluma, CA
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    Default Re: Wood for deck

    my decks are Yellow Cedar, have no preservative/coating on them, and have withstood the weather for 50 years, with not a spot of rot.

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