Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: What to do with old canoe frame?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Oxford, MD in Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    12

    Default What to do with old canoe frame?

    I was given an old canoe frame recently used as interior decoration while hung from ceiling of an "A frame" house. It's in good shape, 14 ft LOA, 31 in beam and the stringer/ribands look and feel like mahogany. They're fastened to plywood frames with iron nails. The shape is fair and there's no apparent rot. I don't know much about canoes and assume it must have been the structural support of a canvas canoe at some point.

    Links to pictures below.

    I'd be grateful for anyone's ideas and thoughts as I contemplate a shop project for next winter. Thanks!

    Addendum: I'd also appreciate help with trying to directly insert images into WB Forum posts. Although the links below directly access the pictures when entered directly into a browser, I couldn't get WB software to upload the pcitures directly into the post from photobucket.com and now I see the links are not "active" in the WB Forum post. Sorry for the nuisance.

    [IMG]www.photobucket.com/albums/ff376/mike537/Slide1.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]www.photobucket.com/albums/ff376/mike537/Slide2.jpg[/IMG]
    Last edited by Jock B; 08-07-2011 at 03:29 PM. Reason: Additional info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Deepest Darkest Wales
    Posts
    15,473

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jock B View Post
    Addendum: I'd also appreciate help with trying to directly insert images into WB Forum posts. Although the links below directly access the pictures when entered directly into a browser, I couldn't get WB software to upload the pcitures directly into the post from photobucket.com and now I see the links are not "active" in the WB Forum post. Sorry for the nuisance.
    Images can be accessed from photobucket faily easily

    http://www.photobucket.com/albums/ff...537/Slide1.jpg

    What you needed was "http://i1232.photobucket.com/albums/ff376/mike537/Slide1.jpg"


    Then http://www.photobucket.com/albums/ff...537/Slide2.jpg


    If you go to your album page then hover the mouse over the thumbnail - a dropdown set of option appear - including the direct link img code - click and the ready-formatted image will be copied to your clipboard, ready to be pasted.
    Last edited by P.I. Stazzer-Newt; 08-07-2011 at 04:17 PM.
    Complicated problems usually have simple solutions - which are almost always wrong.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,996

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    Looks pretty similar to one of the old Trailcraft kit boats. Add a canvas skin and a few coats of house paint and you're ready to paddle.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    2,941

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    Seconded.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    on-the-cuyahoga
    Posts
    13,334

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    If the frame is solid it can be covered with any of the currently favored SOF fabrics, ballistic nylon or dacron of a suitable weight. These fabrics have an advantage over cotton canvas in that there are no organisms that will feed on them and cause rot.
    Since this boat is old and nailed together there is the possibility that nails will start to work there way out and puncture the fabric from the inside. If you can forstall that putting the boat back into tripping condition shoudn't be all that hard.
    Last edited by Cuyahoga Chuck; 08-08-2011 at 05:06 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Kilmarnock, Virginia!
    Posts
    1,694

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    I can walk you through the skinning process, if you're interested. It should be quite easy and quick.

    Dave

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    3,396

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    Getting that little canoe back in the water would really be a quick, easy, & fun little project.

    This is one I rescued about 5 yrs ago and had back in the water in about three weeks.









    Some canvas, a staple gun with S.S. staples, & a gallon of oil base porch & deck paint & you're good to go.
    I have three SOF kayaks & one I built as a kid in 1974 that still hasthe original canvas in good shape.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn NY D-F ME
    Posts
    343

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    If you go to the forums of the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association [ http://forums.wcha.org/ ] and do a search on Trailcraft, you will find quite a bit of information about Trailcraft and other skin-on-frame canoes.

    If the nails aren't tight, you might want to replace them with stainless ring nails, and/or you might want to use some glue to reinforce the suspect joints -- but unless they are obviously loose or seriously rusted, I wouldn't worry too much about them. Those stringers have been held in shape for some 40 years, are probably bent permanently by now, so are not likely to come undone -- a properly taut skin will hold them in place as much as they will shape the skin.

    I built one of these in the '70's -- the skin (and canvas will work just fine -- modern materials might or might not save a couple of pounds and might add some bit of strength -- but are not cost-effective, in my opinion, for this canoe) is fastened with staples (stainless) or tacks. The frame and stringers should probably be varnished with a good marine varnish.

    The canvas is then laid over the hull which is inverted on a couple of saw horses. The canvas is temporarily fastened at one end of the keelson (interior keel), stretched tight, then temporarily fastened at the other end of the keelson. Then starting at the center and working alternately from side to side and alternately toward each end, stretch the canvas taut and staple (tack) to the gunwale, working out any wrinkles as you go, and if necessary, restretching and restapling along the keel line. When you reach the point where the stems (bow and stern) begin their curve, stop stapling along the gunwale.

    You will then have to slit the canvas at the point where the stems begin, so the canvas can be drawn tight around the stems. After slitting the canvas, finish off one side of each stem, keeping the canvas taut while stappling or tacking the canvas to the stem and the gunwale. Trim the tacked canvas around the stem -- then do the other side, overlapping the canvas on the stem. When one end is finished, do the other.

    The original Trailcraft instructions called for simply painting the canvas, though I believe some people have, prior to painting, filled the canvas with the traditional filler usually used for woo/canvas canoes. Using filler would add several pounds to the canoe, and would require up to a couple of months to cure. I did not use filler, and while the resulting skin was far from perfectly smooth (the texture of the canvas remained), the painted canvas was durable and water-tight. Once painted, outer rails (which your photos show to be missing from your canoe) should be fastened at the gunwales to cover the staples and tacks. These canoes were also designed to have an exterior keel which both protects the bottom of the canoe and (with the outer rails) adds some structural rigidity to the hull. On Trailcrafts, the outer rails and the keel, like the stringers, were some sort of mahogany. I expect that spruce, fir, ash, or most any boat-building wood would be fine. Varnish the rails and keel and you are done.

    These canoes are quite sturdy -- much more than you might think. Mine was car-topped around New England and Canada, usually used for day trips, and at least one time, on a camping trip in Nova Scotia.

    Your frame looks to be in good shape -- I would put a couple of coats of varnish on, and then as Todd says, a canvas skin (cheaper than more modern materials) and a couple of coats of house paint (or if you wish to be extravagant, something fancier, but not needed), and you are good to go -- a week, or at most, two weekends and the days between (allowing time for varnish and paint to dry) and you could be on the water.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Oxford, MD in Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    Thank you all for your encouragement and helpful guidance, especially Greg and Ned.
    And P.I. Stazzer-Newt, thanks for unraveling the image posting problem for me.

    With all these positive thoughts from the forum now implanted in my brain, I’ll take up restoring the SOF canoe this winter. Right now projects on our small Garden-designed wooden motorsailer and restoration of a 37 yo, 9 ft cold molded sailboat are keeping me busy.

    I’ll research modern fabrics with next door neighbor who’s a sailmaker and post anything of interest. But it certainly appears that canvas or nylon have a long and very successful history.

    Thanks again.

    Jock B

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    3,396

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    And another one




    After I put the frame back together it took some canvas we had at home and a $5.00 gallon of 'mistint' paint from our local paint store.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Southern Missouri
    Posts
    681

    Default Re: What to do with old canoe frame?

    Yep, that's what I'd do, stretch canvas and paint it! Or, I started to say sell it to Bass Pro, but I see you're not in the USA. Sell it to a pub or resturant to hang on a wall. A sport goods store/clothing store could hand it up and hang clothes off of it for a display. Sell it to a commercial vendor as a unique way to display goods, otherwise...I'd use it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •