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Thread: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Roald Dahl had some good animal names. Terry Pratchett may have as well. I'm sure there are others, but there is just too much blood in my caffeine system to remember them.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    A week for the latex enamel paint to dry, and this is how it looks now:



    A cold week, and rainy, so I didn't do much other than coating the decks with epoxy to prepare for painting next week when temps are supposed to be higher.



    I'm really looking forward to the launch. It might just maybe possibly happen before winter.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    What a lovely boat.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Now it looks green!

    Very pretty.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Thanks for the comments--it's a beautiful design for sure.

    A little more progress this week, with the final decisions on a few structural details--mostly dealing with the mast partner. The plans show mast boxes that are open on the aft side, making it easy to drop the heel of the mast into the step and walk the mast up without needing to lift it to thwart level. This was one of the things I really liked about the construction details in this boat.

    However, in practice (i.e. climbing into the boat on the trailer and raising the mast), the heel of the mast is basically already at the level of the thwart, as the mast lays across the thwarts anyway. I found it worked best to sit on the thwart just aft of the mast step, angle the mast so the tip stuck out over the port quarter (nicely supported by the seat back for the sternsheet seat), and drop the heel into the partner--that is, in practice, the heel of the mast begins at thwart level when you start to raise it, so the open box didn't seem to be absolutely necessary.

    I had also been considering lots of options for mast partner details, including mast gates vs. lashings, and where and how to install the downhaul, and hadn't hit on any combination that seemed just right. I really wanted to avoid cluttering up the forward "deck" (at thwart level) with a cleat to lash the mast to, wasn't really keen on a mast gate, and wanted an ultra-simple downhaul (basically a ring on a rope) besides. Once I decided the open mast box was no longer crucial, installing a permanent mast partner rather than a gate seemed to solve all the issues at once. I was kind of surprised that this was what I decided on, but here it is:



    I'll be able to simply drill a hole through the timber (pinrail?) just to port of the mast to run a loop of non-stretch line with a ring on it, and that will be my downhaul attachment.

    In practice this set-up actually seems a bit easier to raise the mast with, as you can brace the lower part of the mast against the pinrail/partner as you begin--with the open box, there was nothing to brace against. Counter-intuitive, as I expected the open box to be better, but it didn't work out that way for me. They're really about the same as far as convenience of raising/lowering, so I went with this because it simplified my downhaul.

    As an additional bonus, the pinrail set-up also serves as the forward cleat for the sleeping platform planks that run here. And since there is no gap in the cleat (as there would have to be with an open mast box), I'll be able to notch the planks to fill in the center gap that would otherwise result from the intrusion of the centerboard case. Lots of advantages for a simple change that requires no hardware at all.

    It'll take some care not to lever against the structure when handling the mast, but once through-bolted and epoxied in place, I won't really be worried about its strength:



    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 10-20-2016 at 02:25 PM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    And of course once I had the mast partner sorted out, I couldn't resist hoisting the sail to check it out...



    I had to cobble together some trashy cheap line for a halyard and set up a temporary sheet and downhaul--all while I should have been actually working on the boat in the last of the good weather this fall. But some things are more important than work in their own way.

    This is the first really good sail I've owned--had it made by Stuart Hopkins of Dabbler Sails, and it looks great. It's his Contender 5 oz cream Dacron. Since I plan to sail under mainsail alone a lot, I had an extra set of reef points put in. Details of the sail are great--e.g. instead of cutting the reefing ties with a hot knife, they're finished with a whipping (I'm guessing to save wear and tear from the melted plastic chafing against the sailcloth?). I also got a long bag for stowing the sail and yard, which will be really nice.

    Edit to add: the photos I'm posting don't show up in their proper orientation after I rotated them on Photobucket--I'm hoping that's just a temporary lag, and you are all looking at correctly sized and oriented photos. They're not showing up that way for me right now.



    Getting closer to launching--also got the oarlock pads fitted for the center (solo) rowing station:



    My brother made the oars a couple of years ago for a birthday present--looks like I'll be putting them to use pretty soon.

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 10-20-2016 at 08:43 PM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Looking good, Tom.

    One thing that is not clear from the pictures - are you planning on installing some sort of abrasion protection on the keel? I'd recommend it, and if you do, you'll need to run it up around the forefoot, which takes quite a beating from beach landings.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Alex,

    thanks for chiming in--how is Firedrake suiting you after a season of use? I'm just lately remembering that I may actually prefer a boomless standing lug over a balance lug, so I'm looking forward to getting out there.

    And thanks for the suggestion on the keel. I've got several layers of glass on the keel and stem, which I think will be adequate, based on my experiences so far with other boats that have used only paint on the stem and keel. We'll see, I guess, but I'm not too worried about it at the moment (I saw a table posted somewhere on the Forum that showed how long it takes to sand through a layer of 6 oz glass with a belt sander held continuously against the glass, and was much reassured). Then, too, a lot of my typical use in the tide-free waters of the Great Lakes involves an anchor off the stern to hold the boat off the beach entirely, with a line ashore from the bow to hold it in place.

    I used to think I would have lost lots of time trying a lapstrake build as you did, what with lining off, spiling, etc. I now think I would have saved all that time and more by not needing so much fairing and sanding on the hull!

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Looking great Tom!

    After all these animal names, I might just add another to my long list of possible names-Bagheera from the Jungle Book.

    Well, I just looked, and found a pretty cool boat by that name on a way cool adventure https://bagheerasailing.com

    Back to the list I guess.

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon1 View Post
    Looking great Tom!

    After all these animal names, I might just add another to my long list of possible names-Bagheera from the Jungle Book.

    Well, I just looked, and found a pretty cool boat by that name on a way cool adventure https://bagheerasailing.com

    Back to the list I guess.

    Mike
    Mike,

    thanks--funny, but I had thought of Bagheera a long time ago when I thought I might paint my Alaska black, and just today started thinking about it again. Actually, my all-time favorite boat name is Geoff Kerr's "Ned Ludd" but I can't get away with stealing that one around here!

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Alex,

    thanks for chiming in--how is Firedrake suiting you after a season of use? I'm just lately remembering that I may actually prefer a boomless standing lug over a balance lug, so I'm looking forward to getting out there.

    Tom
    Tom,

    In post #77 towards the end of this thread
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-and-Oar/page2
    I summed up what I learned over the summer.

    I have a list of minor improvements and upgrades to make over the winter, but nothing major except I have to add length to the mast - I've just started a thread seeking advice on how to do a clothespin scarf.

    With regard to potential names, since you do most of your sailing in and around the Great Lakes, how about a nod to some famous Great Lakes Pirates, e.g.:
    "Calico Jack" after Calico Jack Rackham, or
    "Roaring Dan" after Roaring Dan Seavey?
    http://www.northernexpress.com/michi...eat-lakes.html
    Or you could name your boat after a trick Roaring Dan used, called "Moon Cussing"

    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    I'm a bit skeptical of the Great Lakes pirates link, as Calico Jack Rackham was actually a famous Caribbean pirate who was associated with Anne Bonney and Mary Reed, two notorious lady pirates. But Roaring Dan sounds interesting with his moon cussing.

    How do you think your Alaska compares to Firedrake? Sounds like you're happy with it--must be neat to design AND build a boat that does what you want it to.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I'm a bit skeptical of the Great Lakes pirates link, as Calico Jack Rackham was actually a famous Caribbean pirate who was associated with Anne Bonney and Mary Reed, two notorious lady pirates. But Roaring Dan sounds interesting with his moon cussing.

    How do you think your Alaska compares to Firedrake? Sounds like you're happy with it--must be neat to design AND build a boat that does what you want it to.

    Tom
    I personally think Moon Cussing would be a fine name for a boat.

    Fire-Drake vs Alaska?

    Goes to windward better. Stands up to strong winds better. More work to row. All of which I expected and hoped-for. Still, it was good to have it all confirmed.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    One more update as I get ready to put the boat away for the winter. I'm really happy with the green for the hull paint. The cream decks strike me as a bit too close in color to the white interior--I may try to repaint with a darker beige. Or not.



    Almost everything on the hull is done except finishing the seat tops and screwing them down, and finishing the rest of the brightwork. Still need to build the tiller and assemble/paint the rudder. But it's looking good for a spring launch.



    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Beautiful work!

    /fredrik

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Looking good Tom!

    I see you haven't got the mizzen mast cut-out in the aft thwart yet. Are you going to treat it the same as the middle mast step?
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Alex,

    I'm thinking I will sail the first season with the mainsail alone, and leave the aft partner uninstalled for now--partly because:

    1) I need to save up for a mizzen

    2) I really prefer a simple one sail/one sheet rig for cruising

    3) I expect to sail a lot in winds strong enough that the mizzen might be struck

    4) I might decide to go with a yawl rig instead, which will make that mast step unnecessary

    5) I'm undecided about how I want to do a partner, as the option I used for the center step might get in the way back there near the helm

    I suppose that #2 is my main reason, though. I am still not entirely convinced that the advantages of a mizzen, for me, make up for the added complications when cruising. Having two masts aboard, two yards, two sail bundles, plus oars--that gets to be a lot of stuff when added to all the cruising gear. And I may be too lazy to do a lot of sail switching anyway. The boat looks a little undercanvassed to me with main alone, but it should be an easily driven hull, and I tend to row rather than try to ghost along in light airs.

    Basically I'm not in any hurry to do anything permanent-ish before getting some miles in the boat.

    Any thoughts on my thinking? Any recommendations based on your experiences?

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Looks great. I like that Sampson post!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    If you're not sailing in company with other boats, who cares how fast you're going, as long as you're going fast enough to suit yourself. Undercanvassed also means you have more time afloat for any given journey, and what's so very wrong with that?

    I do think the yawl rig and the mizzen are far more useful and convenient than they are any source of complication myself, especially when it comes to improving the ergonomics and your sailing position in the cockpit, but I get it that we all might have different priorities.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build


    Tom, if you have a mizzen, you'll still be smiling if you get caught in a 25kt squall. The mizzen really is the best small boat saftey feature I can think of besides the life jacket (and common sense).
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    Tom, if you have a mizzen, you'll still be smiling if you get caught in a 25kt squall. The mizzen really is the best small boat saftey feature I can think of besides the life jacket (and common sense).
    + 1 for the mizzen for ease of heaving to in tough conditions, it really gives you far more control in a small boat

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Alex,

    I'm thinking I will sail the first season with the mainsail alone, and leave the aft partner uninstalled for now--partly because:

    1) I need to save up for a mizzen

    2) I really prefer a simple one sail/one sheet rig for cruising

    3) I expect to sail a lot in winds strong enough that the mizzen might be struck

    4) I might decide to go with a yawl rig instead, which will make that mast step unnecessary

    5) I'm undecided about how I want to do a partner, as the option I used for the center step might get in the way back there near the helm

    I suppose that #2 is my main reason, though. I am still not entirely convinced that the advantages of a mizzen, for me, make up for the added complications when cruising. Having two masts aboard, two yards, two sail bundles, plus oars--that gets to be a lot of stuff when added to all the cruising gear. And I may be too lazy to do a lot of sail switching anyway. The boat looks a little undercanvassed to me with main alone, but it should be an easily driven hull, and I tend to row rather than try to ghost along in light airs.

    Basically I'm not in any hurry to do anything permanent-ish before getting some miles in the boat.

    Any thoughts on my thinking? Any recommendations based on your experiences?

    Tom
    Tom,

    Alaska is a little undercanvassed with the main alone in the centre position, but it is really only noticeable in light winds. As soon as the wind gets up a little (e.g. 6-8 kts+) it moves along just fine.

    Regarding a mizzen, as you know I swapped out the original ketch mizzen on my boat for a yawl mizzen that I had made, that was much smaller in area and set in the aft deck position. While this didn't add a lot of additional drive (it was only about 15 ft2), it did bring all the benefits the others mention - good balance and beautiful weathercocking behaviour for when you are raising the main or dropping it to put a reef in. Without a mizzen, the boat tends to lay nearly broadside to the wind when tying in a reef. The ketch mizzen centre of effort was far enough forward it never really weathercocked the boat properly.

    The yawl mizzen is so unobtrusive back there it's nearly set and forget, except for tending the sheet. It's also small enough that the package it makes when struck for rowing also doesn't take up much room, and it takes only seconds to strike or set up. It did require me to go to a push-pull tiller, but that had the added benefit that I could sit further forward and thus further outboard, when going to windward, allowing me to carry the main a little longer before needing to reef.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    The Alaska is a beautiful boat. I'm looking forward to when you start taking it out on trips, and sharing it here like you did with your brothers Phoenix III on Lake Nipigon. It seems like the perfect fit for the type of trips you do. Long process - these projects, but well worth it in the end. Keep up the good work.

    Travis.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Zuri View Post
    The Alaska is a beautiful boat. I'm looking forward to when you start taking it out on trips, and sharing it here like you did with your brothers Phoenix III on Lake Nipigon. It seems like the perfect fit for the type of trips you do.
    Thanks for the comment--yeah, I'm really looking forward to it. I have lots of interesting trips in mind. With luck I'll be able to convince my brother to come along with his Phoenix III. I like solo trips a lot, but a trip where there are several boats sailing in company is another good way to travel.

    My boat's in storage for the winter now--round about March I will pull it out and finish up the last bits, including:

    1) Finish the brightwork (rubrails, seat tops, sternsheet backrest, spars)

    2) Assemble the rudder and install uphaul/downhaul lines

    3) Build a tiller

    4) Install bag tie-downs in cockpit

    5) Install some horn cleats

    A few other small things but that's mainly it. I'm pretty sure that, after years of saying "I'll launch in spring," that this time I might actually do it.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    looks good tom ! Do you sail the apostles at all? I haven't but my friends just bought a campground in cornicopia
    Prost
    Ben
    editor sought , untill found i apologize for the grammer and spelling

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Zymguy View Post
    looks good tom ! Do you sail the apostles at all? I haven't but my friends just bought a campground in cornicopia
    Prost
    Ben
    Ben,

    thanks for the comment. My brother and I did one trip to the Apostles in his Phoenix III, and I was a little surprised to find it's a much bigger area than I thought. Some of those islands are pretty far apart, with some decent exposure between them. We did sail around Devils Island but didn't make it to Outer Island--ran out of time. It's a little difficult to cruise there unless you're set up to sleep aboard, as otherwise you need to reserve campsites ahead of time and the weather may disallow your chosen itinerary.

    Here is a link to a thread about our Apostle Islands trip.

    Overall, I think I prefer Georgian Bay/northern Lake Superior/North Channel cruising with lots of exposed granite bedrock, but I'd happily visit the Apostles again. I'd just make sure I was ready to anchor out and sleep aboard instead of trying to reserve campsites.

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 11-27-2016 at 10:11 AM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Time to give this thread a bump since the last of the action way back in November. Latest update from this weekend (again, lots of help from my brother, who must be sick of me borrowing his Phoenix III):

    The boat is done. Almost.

    1. Everything that needs to be painted is painted--except the rudder blade. Just waiting on the epoxy to cure before sanding and prepping it for paint.

    2. All the brightwork (tiller, spars, gunwales, thwarts, samson post, sternsheets backrest) is oiled, with just a little varnish to go on the rudder head yet. I have to say the oiled wood looks really sharp contrasted with the green hull and beige decks.

    3. Everything not epoxied in place has been bedded and screwed--except for changing out the oarlock socket screws for through bolts (just got the longer bolts).

    4. The rudder uphaul/downhaul lines are working well, with just the last step of installing the jam cleat on the tiller once I've sailed it a bit and know where I want it. The tiller also seems to work well, with a light touch. Later I'll install a swiveling extension--just ordered the swivel from Duckworks.

    5. The downhaul and halyard are ready to go, and the sail is laced onto the yard.

    6. The centerboard is installed--still need to decide on how I want to cleat it.

    7. Oars have been wrapped with line, and buttons installed.

    Launching should be on Saturday.

    Sad, I know--a new posting to this thread with no new photos. But after a LOOOONG seven-year build with lots of non-productive time away from the boat (grad school in Idaho, teaching in the Middle East, storing the boat in an unheated garage a three-hour drive from home, and many other excuses), the end (beginning!) is finally in sight.

    I'm really going to like this boat, I think.

    Launch photos and comments on Saturday. First cruise scheduled for the last week of June.

    Cheers!

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 05-31-2017 at 07:03 AM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Launching is good. I'm rooting for you, Tom. That is some seriously delayed gratification.

  29. #99
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    Default

    Looking forward to report and photos from the launch. Alaska is a fine boat.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Muchos photos, por favor!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Reminds me of my very long, much delayed build of Coquina. First time in the water it was all so worth it. Congratulations on getting so close!!
    Last edited by Skegemog; 05-30-2017 at 03:20 PM.

  32. #102
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Thanks for the comments, everyone. As for this:

    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Launching is good. I'm rooting for you, Tom. That is some seriously delayed gratification.
    An argument could be made that it's actually the opposite of delayed gratification--I kept going sailing with other people's boats instead of finishing my Alaska...

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Congratulations, Tom - you've kept the faith and now you will [hopefully] reap the rewards. The tweaking of systems never seems to stop but she kind of feels like a lifelong friend after a dozen years - ever patient and tolerant of my momentary lapses in judgment and general foolishness.
    Last edited by darroch; 05-30-2017 at 12:49 PM.

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    Location
    Ely / Boundary waters canoe area wilderness
    Posts
    139

    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    where is the maiden voyage?
    editor sought , untill found i apologize for the grammer and spelling

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,626

    Default Re: Progress on Kurylko Alaska Build

    Good question. Probably the first trip that will come close to deserving the "voyage" label will be to the Turtle-Flambeau Flowage, a dammed river/lake system in northern Wisconsin:



    It has a nice wilderness feel, with lots of undeveloped shoreline and 60-70 islands scattered around. Better yet, the DNR has about 60 free campsites available there on various islands on a first-come, first-served basis with no reservation system. It should be a nice trip to explore around by sail and oar and get to know the new boat:

    Here's a closer look:



    Then maybe later in summer, a trip to Georgian Bay might be in order. And after that, lots of ideas for long trips.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

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