View Poll Results: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

Voters
19. You may not vote on this poll
  • Long Point Skiff

    7 36.84%
  • Pilgrim's Pride 16

    2 10.53%
  • Lumber Yard Skiff

    4 21.05%
  • Sea Hoss Skiff

    1 5.26%
  • Other

    5 26.32%
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southeastern CT
    Posts
    221

    Default The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    I have all but decided to build Tom Hill's Long Point Skiff. It's a beautiful looking boat. It's a little narrow (5'1" beam) compared to other skiffs, but other than that I can't find anything I don't like about it. I like the fact it has high freeboard, should be nice for the waters around Mystic, CT.

    I wanted to get some feedback on other flat bottom skiffs before I actually start building one this fall. Here is a list of designs I have looked at:

    Long Point Skiff http://www.thomasjhillboatdesigns.co...ong_point.html
    Pilgrim's Pride 16 http://www.shoestringshipyard.com/pilgrims-pride/
    Lumber Yard Skiff http://www.oldwharf.com/ow_workskiffs.html
    Sea Hoss Skiff (Not sure if plans are available.)

    Let me know your favorite design, and why you think it's the best.
    Last edited by jahlinux; 07-17-2011 at 09:11 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    N. California
    Posts
    425

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    I plan to build a Jeff Spira Carolina dory, simple construction and a practical boat. Worth a look anyway! They come in all sizes click on "boats you can build." They are not as elegant as the Long Point.

    16' http://www.spirainternational.com/hp_oyst.html

    18' http://www.spirainternational.com/hp_caro.html
    Last edited by stevebla; 07-16-2011 at 11:39 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas and points north
    Posts
    6,726

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    1,127

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    If I built a 16' flat bottom it would be a Garvey. Something like this.
    http://www.dhylanboats.com/ben_garvey_plans.html
    Not a true flat bottom but close enough.
    Gary
    "The hand feeds the mind."
    Weston Farmer

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    SPID
    Posts
    4,721

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    You didn't say what kind of skiff, but from your list I'd guess you're looking for a planing outboard skiff.

    Do you plan to row?
    What sort of load will you be carrying?
    What conditions do you anticipate?
    What construction method will you be using?
    Why flat bottom?
    Trailered or moored?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    upstate NY near Mass border
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    That long point is a sharp disign for sure!!! Would not mind having one of them in the 18-19foot range
    Paul B

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Ash, NC (not Asheville)
    Posts
    12,726

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    I like the plumb bow of the Long Point. It seems like it would be less likely to climb up on the swells and pound.

    Doug

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southeastern CT
    Posts
    221

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryLL View Post
    You didn't say what kind of skiff, but from your list I'd guess you're looking for a planing outboard skiff.

    Do you plan to row?
    What sort of load will you be carrying?
    What conditions do you anticipate?
    What construction method will you be using?
    Why flat bottom?
    Trailered or moored?
    I do not plan on rowing, power only.
    Need it to comfortably carry 2 adults, occasionally on nice days maybe 4.
    It will be used in Fishers Island Sound, Mystic River, and Little Narragansett Bay area of southeastern CT.
    Need the flat bottom for easy beaching, and getting into all the shallow spots, which there are many in this area.
    It will be either trailered or at a dock, not at a mooring.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southeastern CT
    Posts
    221

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    Quote Originally Posted by botebum View Post
    I like the plumb bow of the Long Point. It seems like it would be less likely to climb up on the swells and pound.

    Doug
    The plumb bow and high freeboard at the bow really give the Long Point a lot of character.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anacortes, WA
    Posts
    9,984

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    Knowing what I know now, I would never build another flat-bottom skiff under any circumstance. With modern materials and building techniques there is no reason to settle for hydrodynamic crudity. You can build a stronger structure that is more efficient, better performing and can be a much more seaworthy craft by adding shape with more numerous, smaller panels. And you can do it starting with the exact same size stack of materials and $ bills. I don't think you can really use "perfect" to describe a flat-bottom skiff. At best it is a compromise of simplification.
    Last edited by James McMullen; 07-17-2011 at 08:35 AM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,958

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    Constructive thoughts on the Long Point, even though I have not ridden in one, only viewed it from the dock.....

    We use a lot of plumb boat stems in many small work boats. Plumb stems create another set of circumstances in some boats. This can reduce a lot of flare in the sides thats sometimes needed in open water applications. For sure the high side helps in he foward area, but really does not do a lot back aft for keeping helmsman dry in many cases.

    Of course the boat is flat bottom so this also changes the comfort needle in open and exposed waters. so personally for me the height could be reduced which would also reduce some of the windage when the boat is loaded even with one or two people in it.

    Running downsea in inlets would probably be the negative in the boat until you learn to handle the boat accordingly. Character? I personally want a good combination of functionality? [a word?] if I am going to give up some handling with a flat bottom boat. For me the flat bottom feature contradicts the need for such a highsided boat in any and all 16 footers.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    SPID
    Posts
    4,721

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    Quote Originally Posted by jahlinux View Post
    I do not plan on rowing, power only.
    Need it to comfortably carry 2 adults, occasionally on nice days maybe 4.
    It will be used in Fishers Island Sound, Mystic River, and Little Narragansett Bay area of southeastern CT.
    Need the flat bottom for easy beaching, and getting into all the shallow spots, which there are many in this area.
    It will be either trailered or at a dock, not at a mooring.
    This is the boat I'd choose for that use, already mentioned above by Gary.


    It is the 15'9" Ben Garvey by Doug Hylan (http://www.dhylanboats.com/).

    The plumb bow and high freeboard of the Long Point might look jaunty, but it's not ideal when working into big waves or running downwind in a following sea. Since you'll be taking the boat out on the salt you will eventually encounter those conditions

    The Ben Garvey is very slightly V-bottom aft and sharply veed forward, which will make for a much smoother and safer ride in rough conditions. The bow is wide and overhung and excellent for loading gear at the water's edge. It's also available in a larger version at 19'. Plywood/epoxy/S&G. Plans available from WB.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anacortes, WA
    Posts
    9,984

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    This is the 16' salt-water skiff that I am using for crabbing, the Devlin Candlefish 16. It's enormously more seakindly than any of those flatties you mention in your poll. This boat handles the tide rips and eddylines without much care. And you most definitely don't need a wide, flat plywood bottom to be beachable. A warped-v is markedly superior for a small planing powerboat in rougher waters.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,958

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    For some perspective, these are simular style boats thats been built for decades. The difference is that a flare is generated into the sides, improving the boat for sure.






    This shot clearly shows the entry and profile that truely works better in short chops, IMO.[photo previously provided by a forum member] pretty boat!



    So you really need to consider what you plan on using your boat for and the types of water you plan on boating in before you go with a flat bottom. People seem to have the idea that flat bottom boat is easier to build while forgetting to consider long term uses. I too have a garvey and accept the compromises but the design is far superior to any and all flat bottom boats in anything other than protected or flat waters.
    Last edited by erster; 07-17-2011 at 09:06 AM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southeastern CT
    Posts
    221

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    I originally started looking at the 16’ Ben Garvey. I decided to go with a more tradition style hull design. The Garvey definitely has some advantages over the Long Point. I like the higher freeboard and center console on the Long Point over the Garvey. I know I could modify the plans, but I’m just not that into the look of garvey hulls.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    SPID
    Posts
    4,721

    Default Re: The Perfect 16 Foot Flat Bottom Skiff

    Quote Originally Posted by jahlinux View Post
    I originally started looking at the 16’ Ben Garvey. I decided to go with a more tradition style hull design. The Garvey definitely has some advantages over the Long Point. I like the higher freeboard and center console on the Long Point over the Garvey. I know I could modify the plans, but I’m just not that into the look of garvey hulls.
    High freeboard on a flat-bottom skiff does not mean a safer or drier boat. You've heard some very good advice from very experienced boaters, and it would be a mistake to select a design on looks alone. The garvey isn't for everyone, but the Candlefish 16 that James suggested would be a great choice.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •