Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3,375

    Default Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent



    The Keyhavenpotterers, Ed and dad Brian, had a wonderful day out in our Tirrik on Sunday. Blue sky, sparkling sea, nice warm 10 knot sea breeze. So you know what we're sailing she's an Oughtred Tirrik, 17ft double ender, slightly shorter than a Ness Yawl, 4 strakes. Occume on Sapeli. Sapeli fit out. Metal centreplate on small drum winch. Bermudan sloop rig with solid Douglas Fir spars. No extra ballast, but two of us (80-100kg blokes) in the boat so I'd guess she would be at her DWL. She's a good boat for a UK builder, as she fits in a UK garage. During our sailing season, just on some special days, everything goes just right and the summer appears, often when we are not expecting it. These special days last us long through the winter, remembering them and looking forward to new ones.

    There's several video's of the Tirrik sailing along in the Solent if you click here:-

    https://picasaweb.google.com/Brian.A...yhaven3rdJuly#

    This was our third time out in the Oughtred Tirrik. Some observations so far:-

    1. She's very good in waves. Taken straight on, a large powerboat wake just in front of us, she remained dry, all spray deflected out. The length of the boat and bow seemed take it very well, little pitching, and quite unaffected. She was better than my Tammie Norrie in this respect due to the extra length I guess for someone going further out. I guess the narow water line is good for cutting through and the reserve stability at the bow deflects things out. Also good with waves quartering or side on. She's good in that a nervous crew would find her motion reassuring. She's kinda floaty - like she floats along and over stuff, that your expecting to unsettle the boat, so you don't need to brace hardly. Healed over, there isn't much freeboard on the leeward side, and she's not got side decks (as drawn), so I wouldn't want to be knocked over, as she'd scoop water quickly, hence the reefing early protocol.

    2. She pointed to 40 degrees perhaps off the wind, perhaps 30 dehrees to the apparent wind. She certainly felt like she pointed high like a good bermudan sloop. What was surprising was that she pointed very well without a profiled centreboard or rudder. The centreboard on her is a flat steel plate and her rudder is flat accross the chord. Its not scientific, but we've had many dinghies and boats, but I'm surprised by the performance of that simple metal plate, and I'm wondering if its worth building profiled centreboard's in practice now. For someone wanting the extra stability of a metal plate and to save building time, I don't think there's any loss of performance noticable to a cruising sailer. I know, I've read all the technical stuff, NACA profiles, the lot, just in reality, with a narrow metal plate she was pointing high (higher than a 420) and going at the same speed in light airs. I'm just sayin, metal plates seem to work actually very well. Two metal foils and cheap aluminium tube spars for a boat, saves alot of time potentially and make building very time efficient. If anyone says metal plates don't point well, I'm afraid I don't believe them. They do in practice.

    3. We got some Harken blocks on her a 6:1 on the boom downhaul, a 4:1 on the kicker and mainsheet and they were a big improvement, and the sails adjusted real easy. Spliced dyneema for the control lines, and some Maffioli Swiftchord on the mainsheet (dyneema core with a grippy non kinking outer). I know its not done by everyone, but the Harken mainsheet with a cleat, makes sailing while drinking and eating alot easier. Sitting on a spare memory foam cushion is also a pleasure for one's bottom.

    4. The sails were by R&J in the UK. We've got the invoice from the sail maker with the boat, for the jib and main and these are very good value indeed. They are in cream dacron, nicely sewn and have bronze hanks on the jib and sewn leather wear patches - nice details. Its sometime good to use a local sail maker, to discuss things and look at the spar bend etc to the sails are cut right, but these were great and good value and nicely made and suited the spars - definately a big thumbs up for R&J from us. It says they use Contender sail cloth which is good stuff.

    Here's our sails, just need some tweeking, easing the leach line and the outhaul https://picasaweb.google.com/Brian.A...28545814466514

    Note they do a novel batten roached main on their Drascombe range of sails...
    http://www.rjsails.co.uk/drascombe_sails.html
    http://www.rjsails.co.uk/classic__tr...nal_sails.html
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 07-05-2011 at 10:52 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    4704' 45'' N 826' 05'' E
    Posts
    773

    Default Re: Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent

    There's seems to be a 404 error with the link as posted ...
    "Smooth seas do not make skillful sailors". African Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3,375

    Default Re: Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent

    Do the links work now? Brian

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent

    Handsome boy and beautiful boat, Brian. Looked like it was a very good day. Thanks for posting the link to the videos.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent

    Link works here in Germany, looks GREAT!

    What part of the Solent are you sailing in? I`ve sailed out of Chichester Harbour a lot, some of the filmed scenes look similar to Chichester but not quite but then things often look different through a cam. lens.

    I may be out there in August, maybe I`ll see you on the water!

    Alan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3,375

    Default Re: Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent

    We sail at the other end of the Solent, at far western end, where the Solent narrows at Hurst just before the Needles. In the videos we are sailing down keyhaven River, then over the Solent heading for Yarmouth and then back towards Keyhaven. It's a wonderful sailing area with very complex tidal flows, so racing is always fascinating. Keyhaven river is very similar to Chichester harbour I think, so they look quite similar. The commercial traffic leaves Southampton and goes East out of the Solent to the English Channel, leaving the Western Solent commercial traffic free for sailing. There's always pressure waves forming due to the waterflow off Yarmouth, even when its windless, so we went through them to see how she was in waves. The Solent was just a small river leading to the English Channel which was also a small river, till after the ice age when rising sea levels caused water to overflow over the bank and onto surrounding areas. It means its shallower than you expect, with a deeper channel where most of the water is flowing at speed, backeddies that can be useful etc. The ebb flow out of the solent against a typical prevailing southwesterly gives it the wind over tide 'solent chop' that appears the moment the tide changes. Water flowing out of the solent gets channeled into Keyhaven by the long shingle bank (hurst spit on which Hurst Castle is situated) and so the stand of water is extra long at Keyhaven with high water extended, but when it goes out, it then really goes out. Because its flattest usually with a southwesterly on the flood (tide with wind), to make the best use of that, you need a boat that can get out of Keyhaven at low water, when the water channel is 20ft wide, hence sail and oar boats, like the Tirrik, suit this. The shoreline along the Isle of Wight makes it interesting. Many Americans boarded the boats for D day here, camping out in the New Forest. The Mulberry Harbours were moored in one of the bays before being towed accross, for landing the hardware. Many small concrete ramps for such activity can be spotted amougst the trees. The Isle of Wight is hilly giving a nice backdrop, with comparitevely little shoreline development, so you get trees right down to the water's edge and little housing development.

    Brian
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 07-05-2011 at 10:55 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: Oughtred Tirrik Sailing in the Solent

    Hi Brian,

    I`ve only been to the east end once when I finaly did the Round-the-Island Race, apart from that I did a lot of dingy racing in Chichester Harbour and Hayling Bay also sailed over to Bembridge in dingys and cruisers (from Hayling).

    The entire Solent is terrific for sailing apart from Portsmouth/Gosport, Southhamton, (a lot of big traffic) Langston (Alright for birdwatching (the feathered kind) and dodging bloody jetskis in the entrance) and going in over Chichester Bar with a stiff SW combined with a falling spingtide (very bad timing but when you`re racing you`ve got to do it!!). Everything else is a sailers paradise!

    Alan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •