Page 45 of 45 FirstFirst ... 354445
Results 1,541 to 1,552 of 1552

Thread: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

  1. #1541
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    17,106

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Diver finds 900-year-old sword on the Mediterranean seafloor.
    Christopher Brito

    FABDE6B9-C590-4416-98C9-79153AE9A106.jpg

    © Provided by CBS NewsA sword believed to have belonged to a Crusader who sailed to the Holy Land almost a millennium ago stands in the water near to where it was recovered from the Mediterranean seabed by an amateur diver, the Israel Antiquities Authority said, Caesarea, Israel October 18, 2021. / Credit: RONEN ZVULUN / REUTERSAn Israeli amateur diver found a large, 900-year-old sword dating back to the Crusades at the bottom of Mediterranean Sea last week, Israeli researchers said on Monday.

    The diver, identified as Shlomi Katzin from Atlit, Israel, discovered the weapon on Saturday among other artifacts on the Mediterranean seabed, including ancient stone anchors, other anchors made of metal, and pottery fragments, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA). The sword has a blade over 39 inches long and a hilt measuring nearly 12 inches, and it likely once belonged to a crusading knight.

    Katzin brought the sword ashore after fearing it could be further buried under the sea's shifting sands. He then reported his find to the IAA and was given a certificate of appreciation for "good citizenship," an IAA spokesperson said.

    "The sword, which has been preserved in perfect condition, is a beautiful and rare find and evidently belonged to a Crusader knight," said Nir Distelfeld, inspector for the IAA's robbery prevention unit. "It was found encrusted with marine organisms, but is apparently made of iron. It is exciting to encounter such a personal object, taking you 900 years back in time to a different era, with knights, armor and swords."

    The sword and the other items were found off Israel's Carmel coast, which has many natural coves that provided shelter for ancient ships during storms, according to Kobi Sharvit, director of IAA's marine archeology unit. Settlements and ancient port cities also developed around some of the larger coves, he said.

    "These conditions have attracted merchant ships down the ages, leaving behind rich archaeological finds. The recently recovered sword is just one such find," Sharvit added.

    41740728-4BB1-4A00-AF19-1F042B7AE124.jpeg


    © Provided by CBS NewsYaakov Sharvit of the IAA holds a sword believed to have belonged to a Crusader who sailed to the Holy Land almost a millennium ago after it was recovered from the Mediterranean seabed by an amateur diver, the Israel Antiquities Authority said, Caesarea, Israel October 18, 2021. / Credit: RONEN ZVULUN / REUTERSAs for the anchors, Sharvit said some of them date back millenniums further than the sword.

    "Identification of the various finds shows that the anchorage was used in as early as the Late Bronze Age, 4,000 years ago," he said. "The recent discovery of the sword suggests that the natural cove was also used in the Crusader period, some 900 years ago."

    After the sword is cleaned and analyzed in the IAA's lab, it will go on public display.
    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



    S/V ORCA 38' Herreshoff Ketch

  2. #1542
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    41,838

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Amazing there's anything left of a 900 YO sword!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #1543
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Bay of Islands,N.Z.
    Posts
    29,254

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    I want that for my garden.

  4. #1544
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    17,106

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    An AFSCME member in Sitka, Alaska, is on the mend after surviving a terrifying workplace hazard – a bear attack.

    Jess Coltharp and Anthony Walloch, fishery technicians for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) and members of ASEA (Alaska State Employees Association) /AFSCME Local 52, were finishing up their workday, surveying a remote stream on Aug. 19.

    Joined by a volunteer named Ethan Christensen, the three men were counting salmon.
    “We’re basically the boots on the ground for the people in the office to know how many fish are getting up and down the creeks,” Coltharp said.



    Jess Coltharp after being attacked by a brown bear while surveying a remote stream near Sitka, Alaska. (Member-provided photo)

    Aaron Dupuis, an area manager for ADF&G, called the men the department’s “eyes and ears in the field during the salmon season.”

    “We’ll send them out for a week at a time, and they’ll do anything [such as] checking our regulatory markers [and] moving them around. Those are important so commercial fisherman know where they can and cannot fish,” Dupuis said. “We have them … counting fish in the streams so then we know ... what’s going on with the salmon runs when we’re trying to decide on whether or not to open something [for fishing].”

    Given that the region has a high density of brown bears and the area around Sitka is heavily forested, bear encounters are frequent. Coltharp and Walloch carry ADF&G-issued Remington shotguns for protection.

    “We’d finished the survey, and we’d run into probably four or five bears on the way up,” Coltharp said, referring to Aug. 19. “It’s pretty common, especially in a lake stream. They don’t have quite as much real estate to fish like on the river. So, there’s a lot of them usually in high concentrations in those places.”

    Typically, bears leave humans alone. Yet what seemed like a routine day quickly morphed into a potential tragedy.

    The three men were halfway back to their boat, following the river. They were moving quickly and laughing, with Coltharp walking about 20 feet ahead. He remembers turning his head to say something to the two behind him when he heard bushes start to break. Coltharp spun around, only to see a brown bear, coming at him full speed.

    “There wasn’t a lot of time to really react and get a shot off because the gun was slung over my shoulder,” said Coltharp. “And by the time I got it around, it was already right there in front of me. So, I definitely remember thinking, ‘Well, I’m not going to be able to shoot this thing, but Anthony should be able to right behind me, and I just got to get out of the way.’”

    Coltharp jumped back and maneuvered his body just enough to protect his heart and lungs.
    “When I did that, the bear just kind of clamped down across my upper knee area,” recalled Coltharp. “He was shaking me about there for maybe just a couple of seconds. I remember yelling, ‘Shoot it, shoot it, shoot it,’ as it’s thrashing me about. I remember hearing the gunshot and thinking, ‘Oh no, my foot’s about to get blown off.’ But I didn’t feel any pain, and the bear just released and fell over dead next to me.”

    “As the bear was running at us, Jess tried to get his gun up, but … the bear was right there at him,” confirmed Walloch. “As he dove to the side, Ethan got out of the way. … The bear bit into Jess’s leg and was starting to shake. And that’s when I was able to get a clean shot. I shot the bear, it rolled off of Jess, and then I took two more shots at the bear, just to ensure that it wasn’t going to get back up.”

    Walloch can still picture the bear running at them. “It was really low to the ground, and its paws are just digging at the dirt, just pushing right towards us. And all I could focus on was, I knew I had to get my gun up.”

    The attack lasted less than a minute.
    The men sat on the grass for a second, stunned by what happened, staring at each other. Then their adrenaline kicked in.



    The bear attack lasted less than a minute. (Member-provided photo)

    “That’s when I changed my focus onto Jess and making sure he was OK,” said Walloch, a certified EMT. “We took off his waders, and then that’s when I noticed the laceration in his left leg … and thankfully, it wasn’t gushing blood.”

    While the attack could’ve been worse, the men still needed to get to safety as soon as possible. They messaged Dupuis, who arranged for a floatplane to pick up Coltharp where the men had dropped anchor. The only problem – the boat was still about half a mile down the river.
    Christensen ran ahead to get the raft and Walloch cleaned and bandaged Coltharp’s wound before he and Christensen paddled furiously to the plane. Coltharp was then flown to Mt. Edgecumbe Medical Center in Sitka.

    From the attack to the emergency room, the whole ordeal lasted a little more than two hours. But this happy ending was only possible thanks to years of training Coltharp and Walloch had undergone.

    Both men grew up hunting and fishing, cultivating love and respect for the outdoors. When they joined the ADF&G, they received more specific training – wilderness safety classes and firearms training.

    “We also go out to the range pretty regularly during our time working just to make sure we can operate the gun effectively and safely and are proficient with it,” Walloch said.

    “Numerous different types of training, as well as repetition of the same training, was pretty important in this situation,” said Coltharp. “It all happened too quickly to where I could not do anything about it. Sometimes that’s just how it is. But him [Walloch] being able to react quickly … was huge. And I think that he was able to do that so effectively because of all that training we’ve done.”

    Walloch and Coltharp had the same advice for their fellow AFSCME members, especially those more accustomed to urban environments: Prepare for the worst, hope for the best.

    “If you’re going camping or hiking, have your safety gear with you,” said Walloch, who signed up for ASEA membership after the bear attack. “And if you have safety gear, know how to use it properly and practice with it. The more practice, the better, because when the time comes, it’ll just be muscle memory, and you’ll know what to do, and you won’t have to think twice about it.”

    “Being prepared for every situation is impossible,” said Coltharp. “But preparing as well as you can, for as many situations as you can, is necessary when you’re out there in the Alaska wilderness, or even the wilderness down in the lower 48.”

    Coltharp continues to heal well and, after some more physical therapy, looks forward to being back outdoors again soon, albeit with even more awareness than before.

    “I don’t think procedural wise there was anything we could have done to prevent it from happening the way it did,” said Coltharp. “But I’ll just be a little more aware of what can happen.”
    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



    S/V ORCA 38' Herreshoff Ketch

  5. #1545
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Isle of Mull, Scotland
    Posts
    8,974

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    And when I got there, the cupboard was bare....
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotla...-west-59062023

  6. #1546
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bournemouth UK
    Posts
    2,058

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Dorchester town crier equals record of 11 national titles




    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-59036005

    Nick

  7. #1547
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    17,106

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



    S/V ORCA 38' Herreshoff Ketch

  8. #1548
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    17,106

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Watch hippos save a wildebeest from crocodiles.





    A tour guide at South Africa’s Kruger National Park has captured a dramatic and remarkable scene in which hippos rescued a wildebeest from attacking crocodiles.


    The accompanying graphic footage, captured by Chase Kurucz, shows two large crocodiles clutching the wildebeest by its head and leg, respectively, at water’s edge.




    “We stopped to watch all the animals come down to drink and saw a cool heron surfing on the back of a hippo, it was an enjoyable sight,” Kurucz, of Chasin’ Africa Safaris, is quoted by News 24.


    “An unsuspecting group of wildebeest sauntered down to the water’s edge for a drink when a huge crocodile jumped right out and immediately grabbed one of the wildebeest, keeping its jaws locked on the animals head.”



    As stated in the video, the crocs were attempting to drag the wildebeest into the water to spin and drown the animal. But their plan was doomed thanks to the presence of so many massive hippos.


    One hippo is seen charging the crocs and several others surround them in a show of force that ultimately prompts the crocs to release their grasp on their prey.


    Kurucz wasn’t sure if the hippos wanted in on the wildebeest kill or were merely trying to thwart the crocs’ attempts at securing a feast.


    “They kept the wildebeest surrounded and it all looked like a pretty hopeless situation,” he said. “[But] the wildebeest was obviously exhausted and it seemed as if the hippos sensed its fear of the whole ordeal.


    “They calmly kept close to the wildebeest but he seemed to have picked up a second wind changing direction and seeking another escape route.”


    The wildebeest found that route but paused for several seconds before continuing toward shore with a badly injured leg.


    The footage, captured at Gezanftombi Dam, was shared to Facebook by Latest Sightings – Greater Kruger on Wednesday

    <<>>

    Note: story is in yahoo sports if you want to see it. Unable to link it here.

    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



    S/V ORCA 38' Herreshoff Ketch

  9. #1549
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    17,106

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    “It’s absolutely incredible that we found that dog”- puppy recovered from F/V Laura

    Dylan Simard November 2, 2021Coast Guard, News, Newsflash 6,697 Views



    Petty Officer Rafael Aguero recovers 8-month old puppy Grace.
    The fishing vessel Laura capsized Monday morning after striking rocks near Sitkalidak Island, at around 7am. The four-person crew safely boarded a life raft, but Grace, the vessel’s puppy had already jumped into the freezing water and was presumed lost. A Coast Guard UH-60 had swept a five-mile area but to no avail. They turned back to nearby Air Station Kodiak to return the crew to dry land.

    The next day, another Coast Guard helicopter crew went over the area, looking for evidence of a fuel spill from the F/V Laura… and perhaps, holding onto a shred of hope that Grace might still be alive. Miracles sometimes do happen in Alaska- by the Grace of dog, she was on a nearby beach.

    “So the dog was directly in front of the boat, off to the side a little bit on… a narrow beach with about 20 to 40 foot cliffs all around her. And I was able to find a way- we ended up landing- I was able to find a way to sort of scramble down that cliff to grab her,” Aguero said.

    That’s Petty Officer Rafael Aguero with the United States Coast Guard. He’s the rescue swimmer who got that puppy off the beach.

    “She was definitely in a little bit of a shock. Definitely hypothermic. So I looked up to her and I knew she was going to be okay. She wagged her tail a little bit. And then I went, picked her up and scrambled back up the cliffs back to the helicopter,” Aguero said.

    Aguero and his crew found it amazing to find her unharmed.

    “To go through those conditions and spend 36 hours alone in the wilderness like that on the beach with the cold and she was otherwise okay- from what I can tell. But it’s absolutely incredible that we found that dog,” Aguero said.

    The dog was reunited with her owner at Air Station Kodiak around 1:30 pm. According to Aguero, Grace is an eight month old, 80-pound pit bull/ black lab mix. And she’s doing just fine.

    Unfortunately, the ship hasn’t fared so well. The wreck is still on the rocks. And according to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, a five-mile long oil sheen about a mile from where the Laura hit the rocks has been sighted. Spill responders say they are monitoring the situation- the vessel’s owner estimates that there was about 3,000 gallons of diesel aboard.


    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



    S/V ORCA 38' Herreshoff Ketch

  10. #1550
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bournemouth UK
    Posts
    2,058

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Passengers may now collect their frozen fish from the baggage reclaim!



    British Airways passengers have been left "baffled" after crates of frozen fish arrived instead of their luggage.


    Becca Braunholtz, from Sherborne, Dorset, said the boxes of sea bass and sea bream were delivered to Terminal 5 of Heathrow Airport on Monday.


    She landed just after 22:00 GMT following a family holiday in Cyprus.


    British Airways said it was reuniting customers with their bags after realising "something fishy was going on".




    Mrs Braunholtz had flown from Larnaca with her husband and two children, aged 11 and seven.


    She said when they arrived at Terminal 5 and saw the frozen fish rotating on the conveyor belt "it was just the weirdest thing".


    She added some passengers were "irate" at the situation.







    "We thought our luggage was in the second wave of deliveries but it was just box after box of fish," she continued.


    "Everybody was being quite British and polite about it but when more and more boxes started going round we all started to suspect something wasn't right."

    Mrs Braunholtz believes there were at least 100 boxes of frozen fish on the conveyor belt, all with stickers for JFK Airport in the US.


    She said when she confronted British Airways staff about the issue they were "perplexed" and did not know how it had happened.


    "We just can't fathom why, at some point, one of the people loading these boxes of fish didn't think 'this can't be right for Terminal 5'... it's baffling," she added.


    Eventually passengers without their luggage were given claim forms and advised to go home.


    The family has since been contacted by British Airways and told their luggage would be returned later on Wednesday.


    In a statement, the airline apologised and said most passengers on the flight received their bags as normal.


    "We've apologised to our customers and we have been reuniting them with their luggage after realising that something fishy was going on," it added.




    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-59141394

    Nick

  11. #1551
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    17,106

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Juneau woman to attempt rare ice swimming feat

    Brrrrrr!




    Longtime Juneau resident Cheryl Fellman has run a marathon, hiked the Appalachian Trail, climbed large mountains and completed challenging open-water swims. Now, this mother of two is on the verge of becoming one of only 43 Americans — and 422 people worldwide — to swim an official Ice Mile.

    Last week, in the chilly waters of Auke Bay, Fellman completed the swim that qualified her to try for the designation. The process involved taking three water temperatures and different depths and completing a standard British mile while wearing only a bathing suit, a swim cap and goggles.

    “It’s nice to challenge these preconceived notions of what your limitations are,” Fellman said in a phone interview Monday morning. “It’s more mental endurance than a physical challenge.”



    The International Ice Swimming Association, organized in 2009 to make ice swimming an official sport, describes the “Ice Mile” as the sport’s “ultimate achievement.”

    Fellman hopes to complete her official swim soon—but timing depends on the weather and the water temperature.
    To qualify as an Ice Mile, the swim must occur in water where the temperature is 41 degrees or lower. Swimmers must be unassisted, wear only a standard bathing suit, one pair of goggles and a standard silicone swimming cap.

    Training
    Fellman said her interest in ice swimming started a few years ago when she traveled to Vermont to compete in an ice swimming race.

    Her latest effort sprung from a goal set in January to swim outside and train for an event in February.
    “The event came and went in February and it became evident that my body was favorably responding, and I was acclimating to the cold,” she said, explaining her decision to stick with it.

    Fellman continued to train over the spring and summer, gradually increasing her time in the water and swimming distances.

    She described the training process as a “song and dance.” She shuffles her time and distance based on the water temperature, she said.

    “Back in February, I may have been in the water for five minutes and shivered for 25 minutes,” she said. “It’s been a process of very slowly acclimating your body so you know what to expect.”
    She said she’s followed a methodical training plan and adheres closely to the rules set forth by the International Ice Swimming Association.

    “Trying to attempt an Ice Mile is not something you just do. You do it by increasing the time and distance in the water in small increments,” she said.

    “One of the things that happens if you haven’t been in cold water, is that you gasp in. That goes away. You don’t have the same level of shock,” she said, noting that she’s able to get in and start swimming more quickly now than she could when she started training.

    Fellman said the actual swim is enjoyable. She recalled seeing hundreds of starfish on the ocean bottom during a recent swim.

    “I love the mindfulness it brings. You physically can’t think of anything while you are swimming,” she said. “For that amount of time, everything shuts down. It’s very peaceful and gives you a high. You are chilled out.”

    The after drop
    Fellman said she feels great right after she gets out of the water. About 10 minutes later, a phenomenon known as the “after drop” occurs.

    She explained that the after drop occurs because the cold blood in her arms and legs starts to cycle through her body. She said that the more she trains, the less harsh the after drop becomes.

    “It felt like someone plugged a cold hose into my fingers. I don’t feel that now,” she said.
    Fellman said she took careful notes to monitor her recovery phase after each swim.
    It takes a team

    Fellman said that when she makes her official attempt to complete the Ice Mile, a support team will help her. She said the team includes an observer who is familiar with the rule book and what it takes to make the swim official. A photographer and videographer will document her swim and the after-drop phase.

    A second witness serves as an observer, people beside her in a kayak will keep a close eye on her stroke and watch for any safety concerns. An on-site medical officer will oversee her recovery.

    “The thinking just doesn’t happen when you first get out,” she said, noting that her team steps in to make sure she has everything she needs to start the recovery.

    “They just know what to do to get you up and out of there and up to the heated car,” she said, adding that her qualifying swim earlier this week provided an opportunity to work out any kinks with the plan.

    Making it official
    Fellman said she’s already completed the paperwork to certify that she’s healthy enough to make the swim. Now, she’s just waiting on the weather.

    With the qualifying swim behind her, she will be ready to go when the water temperature gets low enough.

    “Honestly, we can go through the process and it’s only an attempt at that point. It’s not official until it’s been approved and ratified by international ice swimming,” she said.

    Once she completes this challenge, she said she might be interested in seeking a new one.

    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



    S/V ORCA 38' Herreshoff Ketch

  12. #1552
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    41,838

    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    That's nuts! I've been in water that cold & it's not my idea of fun.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •