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Thread: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North East England
    Posts
    1,314

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    Quote Originally Posted by Saville View Post
    I want a rudder. I'm just not sure what kind so I'm asking questions and gathering information.
    You are in the right place then

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,409

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    Quote Originally Posted by Saville View Post
    I plan to try it. It doesn't cost much in terms of installation work. And while I fully recognize that the steering oar may not be the way to go, I will have made an informed decision by trying it. I will have learned something.

    Also I think it's important to remember that the Marblehead Gunning Dory CAN sail but it's forte is as a rowing boat. I expect to row much more than I will sail. But it's nice to have the capability to sail every so often.

    I'm also going to try the quarter rudder (aka steering board). Again just to see. I've thought through a temporary installation.

    One of the fun things with a steering oar, if it is designed right, is that it can be used for sculling. A small outrigger and a rowlock is all that it takes. But it does need to be a long oar, 10' or so with a big blade; mine is 4' on a 10' oar.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    45,675

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    On my dory Leeward I had an oarlock for a steering oar as well as the rudder as designed by Gardner. I used the oar when coming through surf and for sculling. Nothing wrong with a steering oar well used. It's just that a rudder than can be locked in any angle is a great asset for rowing in boisterous winds and makes sailing much more restful.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Marblehead, Ma
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    On my dory Leeward I had an oarlock for a steering oar as well as the rudder as designed by Gardner. I used the oar when coming through surf and for sculling. Nothing wrong with a steering oar well used. It's just that a rudder than can be locked in any angle is a great asset for rowing in boisterous winds and makes sailing much more restful.
    Hi Ian,

    Roughly where was that oarlock located? How far forward of the sternpost?

    How long was your steering oar?

    thanks,

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    15,531

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    I don't recommend the steering oar, but if you want to go there here's a photo of a Dog-Hole Dory on the Albion river in Northern California with the builders aboard.

    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Marblehead, Ma
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    Quote Originally Posted by Thorne View Post
    I don't recommend the steering oar, but if you want to go there here's a photo of a Dog-Hole Dory on the Albion river in Northern California with the builders aboard.

    What is that fixture that the steering oar is attached too? I tried zooming the photo but I cannot make it out.

    thanks!

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    45,675

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    Looks like a pinned oar lock, common among inland rowboats used for fishing or livery boats rented people with no boating qualifications.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Marblehead, Ma
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Steering Oar vs. Rudder

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    Looks like a pinned oar lock, common among inland rowboats used for fishing or livery boats rented people with no boating qualifications.
    Yeah I can see the pinned oarlock.

    But what is the gray/tan fixture hanging outboard of the gunnel that the oarlock is slid into?

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