Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Rubbing out varnish

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    West Central Ohio
    Posts
    99

    Default Rubbing out varnish

    The boat is all but done, but try as I might, there are a few places that I would sure like to improve the finish on. There are many coats on the hull as 17 were applied, but with the sanding between coats, I don't know how many are actually on the varnish. No matter how fast I worked, there would be places that the brush would drag and leave marks that would now flow in. If I thinned the varnish anymore, the varnish would either run or sag. So now I have a few places I would like to improve. Can you take Epifanes and lightly scuff it with 1500 or 2000 and then rub it out with rubbing compound? Also, now the the varnished pieces are assy. I need to fill the screw holes with filler, but then these need varnish on the filler spots and I am afraid that the building of varnish in these spots will look like warts unlike I can carefully sand these spots and run them out. What do you do? Or what should I have done?

    Now to figure out how to bend the new mahogany 1/2" thick by 4" wide by 38" long deck trim to meet the contours of the deck. I am looking at roughly a 3" bend. Should I do it cold? Or use boiling water. I bought a small steamer and it must be too small as it appears to be worthless.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    7,414

    Default Re: Rubbing out varnish

    Yes, varnish can be rubbed out. But, once one has the application down pat, there is no need.
    Jay

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    10,485

    Default Re: Rubbing out varnish

    It also helps a lot to put the parts together and bung the screw holes BEFORE you varnish.

    You might want to find an accomplished varnisher in your area and ask to watch them once or twice. You are probably 1) sanding too much off, 2) working the wet surface too much ("over brushing") and/or too slowly (not keeping a "wet edge," and, as you observed, 3) over thinning.

    If you aren't happy with your varnish job, just remember, it will have to be redone next year anyhow. Don't make yourself crazy.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    West Central Ohio
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: Rubbing out varnish

    I took apart the boat and stripped all the pieces individually to bare wood. Now I reassembled the boat and need to fill the screw holes as I used the same counter bores as the factory did when they built the boat in '58. I had a real rough time with this varnish. If you laid it as it came from the can, it was drying before you got one length of the boat done. There would be no "wet" edge. If you thinned it, you had to hit it just right or it would sag or run, or still be too dry to keep that wet edge. This is only a 14' boat. I have no idea how a guy can do a real boat. Anyhow, I have about 3 spots on the hull that I feel I could improve on and no one but me probably sees it. Actually the reason for so many coats, was to level the finish. There are the typical little dings that all used wood items seem to have and there are several choices. You can steam them to raise them, which I did. You can use a filler, which can look like you filled a ding or you can lay varnish and block it down until the dent is full and flush with the surrounding area. This is what I did.

    Please don't tell me I will do this next winter again. I have been working on this boat since Nov. with very few days not out in the shop. It takes allot of time though just watching varnish dry so you can sand it back and recoat.

    So I guess, I can fill the screw holes, careful not to get it on the surrounding varnish and then make it flush with varnish. Then I can light sand to level it and then buff it with something like 3m Micro-finish 2000?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •