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Thread: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

  1. #1261
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    I think Epifanes is ordinary enamel. Certainly not a two part paint.

    You can see a few plank joints and such. It is mostly a matter of prep work..
    Many thanks ! First-class prep work, though !

  2. #1262
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Wow. She looks incredible!
    There are few issues in life that cannot be worked out with a sharp chisel and a bit of time

  3. #1263
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    So, with the days growing longer, and the rain finally abating, I am making boat work plans.

    First up is to rebuild the aft bench. When I first did this, now 5+ years ago, I kept the seating part of the bench somewhat narrow. This was, in part, because the sole framing gave me two choices: here, or there.. I chose here, and the result was two small (8 inch wide) sole panels right in front of the bench, and a bench that was somewhat shallow (maybe 15-18 inches deep).

    Over the past few years, we have found that this is not only not very comfortable, but it creates a space between the aft bench and the mid-ship bench that is uncomfortably large. You can put a table in that space, but it is just a little too far to reach easily.

    So, I plan to dismantle the aft bench, and move the front to "there"...This will involve some surgery on the sole, and a little re-work of the front panel of the bench, but mostly it will involve rebuilding the storage lockers inside the bench. This is a good thing, since I was a little sloppy when I built these originally. They are nice, but the covers (which are also the bottoms of the bench) are just ever so slightly non-square, and they are the same, top and bottom. This means that if you take them out (which we do to access stuff in the lockers), you have four possible ways they can go back, and that's assuming you didn't take both of them out...

    I also am planning to FINALLY redo the wheelhouse interior. This is mostly sanding and varnishing, but there will be a little teak cabinetry, and some trim replacement.

    I'll start planning this over the next few weeks.

    Cheers!

    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 05-16-2019 at 09:28 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  4. #1264
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    So, mystery for the day.. Why on earth would Scott start drilling 1 inch diameter holes part way through his beautiful teak bunks?






    Hint: There are eight of these holes...
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  5. #1265
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Um... he likes buying teak?
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  6. #1266
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Cabinet style hinges?

    Slots for pipes for a berth?

    There are people who don't groan & wince when buying teak?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #1267
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I'm with Garret - pipes for a super king size berth :-)
    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  8. #1268
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Cabinet style hinges?

    Slots for pipes for a berth?

    There are people who don't groan & wince when buying teak?
    Bingo!

    Since the houseboat is out of commission, we are planning on spending a lot of time bar MAKOTO this summer. We're a little tired of the narrow separate bunks, so we decided to try filling the space between the bunks with ply panels, and sleeping crosswise instead of lengthwise. I had some bronze tubes left over from the grab rails, so rather than make more teak supports, I decided to use the tubes.

    I'm off to the boat this weekend to cut the tubes and make some templates for the ply panels.

    Everything can then be stored inside the bunks with the bedding when it is not in use!

    Sorry I don't have nay extra LBPC caps, or Garrett would be the winner!

    Cheers,
    Scott
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  9. #1269
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by snow(Alan H) View Post
    I'm with Garret - pipes for a super king size berth :-)
    And Alan wins too!!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  10. #1270
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I didn't get here in time to give my guess of an extra large honeymoon suite. Drats! Foiled by the hand of time again. LOL
    This sig line is proudly provided by The Wooden Boat Magazine Forum. If it ain't The Wooden Boat Mag, it just a rag.

  11. #1271
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I had two of these bronze tubes left over from the grab rail project several years ago. So today I cut them to length. Port Townsend Foundry sent me another tube to complete the set. After I fitted these, I decided to make the wood bunk filler one piece, so the pair of tubes in the photo will just be a single tube, and the forward tube will go way forward to the other end of the bunk. I'll either plug the wood beam, or, maybe just varnish it and leave the cutout.



    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  12. #1272
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Been a while since i last posted. Susan and I were cruising back from the Island (Grindstone Joe's) a few months ago when I noticed the temperature on the Yanmar climbing fast. I found a private dock on Georgianna Slough, and shut her down just as the warning light came on. The dock owner was ver gracious (helps when you tie up with a 91 year old boat!). Vessel Assist got there from Bethel Island in about 30 mins (amazing!), and towed us the rest of the way to Oxbow Marina.

    I suspected the impeller, since there was no water coming from the exhaust. Boy was I right!

    The impeller housing is almost impossible to get to on MAKOTO, since the engine is in a tidy insulated box. I managed to get my bearings using my phone to take some blind pics, and then got the impeller cover off.

    Here's what I found...



    YIKES! No wonder nothing was coming out of the exhaust!

    20 minutes working blind through a little gap between the motor and the box, I got the impeller out.





    And then spent 20 minutes wrestling the new one back in, some detergent helped...



    And then this happened! WHEW!!!

    http://www.mv-makoto.com/makoto/IMG_4357.m4v
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  13. #1273
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Been a while since i last posted. Susan and I were cruising back from the Island (Grindstone Joe's) a few months ago when I noticed the temperature on the Yanmar climbing fast. I found a private dock on Georgianna Slough, and shut her down just as the warning light came on. The dock owner was ver gracious (helps when you tie up with a 91 year old boat!). Vessel Assist got there from Bethel Island in about 30 mins (amazing!), and towed us the rest of the way to Oxbow Marina.

    I suspected the impeller, since there was no water coming from the exhaust. Boy was I right!

    The impeller housing is almost impossible to get to on MAKOTO, since the engine is in a tidy insulated box. I managed to get my bearings using my phone to take some blind pics, and then got the impeller cover off.

    Here's what I found...



    YIKES! No wonder nothing was coming out of the exhaust!

    20 minutes working blind through a little gap between the motor and the box, I got the impeller out.





    And then spent 20 minutes wrestling the new one back in, some detergent helped...



    And then this happened! WHEW!!!

    http://www.mv-makoto.com/makoto/IMG_4357.m4v
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  14. #1274
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    That impeller was almost due for replacement! Nice there was a dock handy.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  15. #1275
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    A wee tip - compress the impeller with a cable tie, when 1/2 in, cut the tie and push it all the way in :-)
    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  16. #1276
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I had about the same thing happen a couple of years ago, ...... only for me it was all four impellers just about at once.

    The only thing you might think about is "where are the missing veins?"..... They have a habit of finding their way into places like oil coolers and getting stuck in elbows.

  17. #1277
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    I had about the same thing happen a couple of years ago, ...... only for me it was all four impellers just about at once.

    The only thing you might think about is "where are the missing veins?"..... They have a habit of finding their way into places like oil coolers and getting stuck in elbows.
    Yeah, I am worrying about that...
    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  18. #1278
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by snow(Alan H) View Post
    A wee tip - compress the impeller with a cable tie, when 1/2 in, cut the tie and push it all the way in :-)
    THAT'S a brilliant idea!!! I'll remember it for the next time!

    Thanks
    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  19. #1279
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    THAT'S a brilliant idea!!! I'll remember it for the next time!

    Thanks
    S
    Rightly so ! There is a ITT tool that retails for 150 dollars, specifically for this purpose.

    Pulling out a knackered impeller is reasonably easy. Putting a new one in isnīt !

    Try out 'Globe' impellers, they may lose their 'punch', but rarely fall to bits and spread havoc around the raw-water circuit
    Last edited by carioca1232001; 01-25-2020 at 08:36 AM.

  20. #1280
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Well, it's been nearly a year with lots of hours on the boat since the impeller incident. She runs cool and sweet, so I guess whoever became of the impeller bits didn't do any harm.

    I am still planning to rebuild the aft salon bench to make it wider. I'll probably start that project in the spring, once the shanty boat is done.

    Here is a pic from Thanksgiving week. We spent 5 nights aboard MAKOTO berthed next to the shanty boat, working on it every day. Thanksgiving morning I woke up to find us surrounded by water hyacinth. By noon, it had all departed on the tide..



    Here was the view of the Island from MAKOTO as we arrived. A very "seasonal" image!!



    Cheers,
    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 12-15-2020 at 06:48 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  21. #1281
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by carioca1232001 View Post
    Many thanks ! First-class prep work, though !
    I love Epifanes. Full disclosure, I have only restored one wooden boat. It took 7 years, so I re-refinished many parts of the boat with just a clearcoat(bright). I liked the way you could sand the Epifanes with Festool Granat sandpaper.

  22. #1282
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Well, it's been nearly a year with lots of hours on the boat since the impeller incident. She runs cool and sweet, so I guess whoever became of the impeller bits didn't do any harm.

    I am still planning to rebuild the aft salon bench to make it wider. I'll probably start that project in the spring, once the shanty boat is done.

    Here is a pic from Thanksgiving week. We spent 5 nights aboard MAKOTO berthed next to the shanty boat, working on it every day. Thanksgiving muring I woke up to find us surrounded by water hyacinth. By noon, it had all departed on the tide..



    Here was the view of the Island from MAKOTO as we arrived. A very "seasonal" image!!



    Cheers,
    Scott
    As the kids say, "nature is metal as fuck".

  23. #1283
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by jonesmatt1957 View Post
    As the kids say, "nature is metal as fuck".

    LOL!!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  24. #1284
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Good to see you and the old girl again. She looks like she appreciates your care.

  25. #1285
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by pcford View Post
    Good to see you and the old girl again. She looks like she appreciates your care.

    She is super stable, and has been out a lot this year! The covered slip with a roll down screen helps a lot!!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  26. #1286
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Here are a couple of more up to date photos.



    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  27. #1287
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Been a long year of lockdowns and no travel.
    We have been out a lot in MAKOTO, mostly to the Island, and only just the two of us. Managed to avoid getting COVID, and did a lot of work on the houseboat.

    MAKOTO's hull paint and brightwork are holding up amazingly well (going on 3 years on both!). We plan to have the brightwork done in the spring, and while we are at it we will finally re-varnish the inside of the wheel house. It's the only part that has not really been done.

    I'll keep y'all posted.

    Stay safe out there!

    S
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-26-2021 at 10:32 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  28. #1288
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    it's good to hear from you and to hear Makato is doing well too! Stay warm out there on the other side.

  29. #1289
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Thanks for the update!!! What a journey. Fantastic boat!
    Nothing else matters but how I raise my children ... and their opinion of me, as a father.

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