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Thread: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

  1. #1191
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Hi folks!

    Well, boating season got off to a slow start this year because of the heavy (heavy and continuous!) rains. It even rained today in the SF area.. Amazing after years of drought.


    Anyway, the rivers have been very high, and clogged with flotsam.. including big logs and deadheads. Our favorite destination Grindstone Joe's was basically underwater for a couple of months, and then needed major clearing and repair work. They still have no dock power. so a visit isn't in the cards any time soon.

    So, I have been focusing on my back yard..We live on a fairly steep hill, and it had never really been properly dealt with. Susan slipped in the backyard a couple of years ago, and broke her ankle (I think I posted pics of that).

    So we finally started terracing things and making it more usable. The most interesting element of this is the walls that the stone mason we are using has built. About 18 months ago he found these big curved granite curbstones (salvaged from Boston Harbor, apparently). We have been incorporating these into the walls with good effect. Here are a few pics.





    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  2. #1192
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Nice! Trucked all the way out there from Boston? Never understood how it was worthwhile to truck stone long distances...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #1193
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Nice! Trucked all the way out there from Boston? Never understood how it was worthwhile to truck stone long distances...

    Yeah, me neither. These stones must each weigh 800-1K lb. We found them here in a stone yard..
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  4. #1194
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Apparently "New Englnd stone walls" are big business. Here in N.E.CT (the heart of stone wall country) there is an old New England textile mill that for the past 15 years or so has been a supplier of stone walls for a wide market. The lot there is probably an acre or more and it is filled with local stones all neatly palletized and ready for shipping. They will buy stone walls and effectively pack them up to go.

  5. #1195
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    Apparently "New Englnd stone walls" are big business. Here in N.E.CT (the heart of stone wall country) there is an old New England textile mill that for the past 15 years or so has been a supplier of stone walls for a wide market. The lot there is probably an acre or more and it is filled with local stones all neatly palletized and ready for shipping. They will buy stone walls and effectively pack them up to go.
    Boy do I have some product for them! It ain't just CT that's got an abundance of wall stone...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  6. #1196
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Other than the big curved granite pieces, these walls were raw local rock (Napa Basalt), selected and then chiseled to fit..but I can see the attraction of a premed stone wall kit, as long as the stones were numbered and there was a guide for re-assembly.. Not my thing, but could be a cool product!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  7. #1197
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    The un-levelness of the walls is an illusion of the photo. The wall curve a lot, so parts of them are closer or farther than others. In person, they are remarkably flat on top!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  8. #1198
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Hi everyone;
    Been a long time!
    MAKOTO is doing fine. I will be starting some new construction on her aft salon later this spring. I'll keep you posted.
    Scott
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  9. #1199
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Had a fun weekend last week competing in the wooden boat challenge with some friends at Bodega Bay, CA. This is part of a seafood festival in a park across the bay from the town (where the move The Birds was filmed).

    We were given 2 sheets of 3/8 ply, 4 tubes of caulk, two bags of drywall screws, and some 2x2's and 1x2s..and three hours to build using only hand tools and electric screwdrivers!

    Two of the guys had developed the design over the past few years, so we had that advantage, although, having won the competition 4 times with this design, it is now heavily copied.

    I'd say the hardest part of the project was cutting out the hull pieces using some big Japanese hand saws. One team had retro fitted a Bosch table saw with a bicycle powered stone wheel for momentum. They would get the wheel going with the pedals and saw just like a regular table saw.. Very cool.

    Anyway, other than a slight twist to the hull (it happens when you build on saw horses without a strong back, I guess), we got this together in about 2 hours. As far as I know, we were the only team using planes, and that made a huge difference in water tightness.

    In the end, we won the craftsmanship award, but came in third to two groups of 20-something firemen in the actual on-the-water race. So much for a team of old guys!

    Here are some pics of the build.

    Cheers!

    Scott

    Edge screwed 3/8 ply, with no chine logs... who woulda thunk.. The trick to this was to mark the hole locations on the bottom and the sides, then drill them separately using a tapered bit. If you don't drill the edge of the ply (right into the center ply of the three ply) then the screws will split the wood, and it will not hold together.



    The hull twist was caused by the port side being slightly longer than the starboard side, and/or not properly placing the hull sides on the bottom.. note that for next time!..put the sides together to make sure they are exact mirrors, and mark the center on them and the bottom (they go on from the center, so placing them in the right place on the bottom is critical)!



    Dan, the designer and one of the (paddlers on the right)...Tom, the other designer and paddler sitting down.



    Dan and Tom paddling for first in the first heat.



    The Master Carpenter award.



    The perpetual Trophy. Dan and Tom have won this 4 times between 2011 and 2014.. then the firemen came in...

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 05-09-2018 at 04:41 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  10. #1200
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Looks like it was great fun. The rock wall also looks great. I am also building terraces but using rock from my land just because stone is so extensive !

    Take care.

  11. #1201
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    had a great cruise to the Stephens Rendezvous in Stockton , CA this past weekend. Had about 15 boats, some of them very large and the rest very old!



    Nice aerial shot taken from George's drone



    MAKOPTO and sister shop SKAL leaving for home



    New addition to the CYA fleet! Firebird (1959 Stephens)


    The smaller classics relegated to the quiet side of the marina



    SKAL, MAKOTO's sister ship (one of seven total made). 1928
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 08-10-2018 at 12:59 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  12. #1202
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    More Stephens Rendezvous...










    Last edited by Cogeniac; 08-10-2018 at 01:09 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  13. #1203
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    MAKOTO and SKAL Heading for home in the smoky morning sun (smoky form the CA fires)

    http://www.mv-makoto.com/makoto/Makoto.mp4
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  14. #1204
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Thanks for the new pics. What pretty boats.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  15. #1205
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    It's like stepping back in time. Wonderful pics and old boats.
    This sig line is proudly provided by The Wooden Boat Magazine Forum. If it ain't The Wooden Boat Mag, it just a rag.

  16. #1206
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Spent a nice weekend out at our island (not OUR island, but a membership association that is and island known as Grindstone Joe's). First time single handing the boat. Very easy and comfortable. Made about 10 knots at 2K RPM on the ebb flow coming home! My son and his wife came out and slept in the houseboat we keep there. Fun times trying out a SUP for the first time (THAT was exciting! I got better on my second try, and only fell once, as I was getting OFF the SUP at the dock).

    Spent the mornings FINALLY patching and then sanding the holes in the overhead. I had to move the stanchions when I went to bronze grab rails, so I had about 20 odd holes to fill. The filling was easy, it was the sanding that was a PITA. The ribs are only about 12 inches apart, so there is hardly any room to move the sanding block, and then it is also overhead on each side of the coin, so you are reaching up, trying to get a good purchase on the block, and the sanding dust is falling in your face.. Sweet!

    I got it done, in the 90 degree morning heat out in the delta. Pics below...

    One thing I noticed on this strip was that, after being out on the river last week, MAKOTO was very tight. I think I hears the bilge pumps maybe 2 times all weekend. The delta seems to suit her.

    We are hauling her next month and will redo the entire hull (topsides paint and bottom paint, together with a full survey. She seems very happy!

    Georgiana Slough



    Coming up on the Island


    MAKOTO docked right outside the houseboat..now THIS is decadent!



    Fresh Nectarine Pie.. YUM!!

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 08-12-2018 at 08:56 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  17. #1207
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    More pics of the Island trip.

    After sanding. It's been a while since she looked like this!!



    All cleaned up!





    Max in the houseboat



    Marla out on the SUP

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 08-12-2018 at 09:08 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  18. #1208
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    The houseboat is a new project. There are seven of these at the Island, and they rarely come up for sale, so when one did, we jumped on it!

    It is currently 1970's RV chic, with all that implies. Our plan is to make it into a proper shanty boat, with a massively updated interior.. I'll do that on a different thread.

    Cheers!

    Scott
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  19. #1209
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Beautiful boat, and and water.
    Everyone I speak to these days seems to be varnishing something…………...

  20. #1210
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    ur better buying a nice 5 gallon bucket from home depot putting all ur money into it and lighting a match.

  21. #1211
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by MvInvader View Post
    ur better buying a nice 5 gallon bucket from home depot putting all ur money into it and lighting a match.
    What a strange first post. I'd say welcome to the forum, but won't if you're going to act that way. Makoto is a beautiful boat that's been restored beautifully. It's a labor of love - but maybe you don't understand.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  22. #1212
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    It looks like you had a great time with makoto at the CYA rendezvous! I love the idea of your houseboat, ... This is what this stuff is all about. Great times.

    I'm thinking of looking into the CYA over hear, but I don't know if there is much activity on the east coast.

    (I don't know what is up with that MvInvader, ..... three posts over 2+ years, and none of them very productive.)

  23. #1213
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    The houseboat is a new project. There are seven of these at the Island, and they rarely come up for sale, so when one did, we jumped on it!

    It is currently 1970's RV chic, with all that implies. Our plan is to make it into a proper shanty boat, with a massively updated interior.. I'll do that on a different thread.

    Cheers!

    Scott
    She's looking ship shape. I don't like sanding, but somedays I get lost in thought, and before I know it I'm thinking,"Geees! That wasn't so bad."

    When you start your shanty thread, would you please post a link here?
    This sig line is proudly provided by The Wooden Boat Magazine Forum. If it ain't The Wooden Boat Mag, it just a rag.

  24. #1214
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Hi Ned;

    Tha CYA has five fleets. Canada (many BC), Pacific Northwest (Seattle and Portland areas,
    Northern CA, Southern CA, and The USA fleet.

    USA cover basically everything other than the west coast. The Commodore Ted Crosby is out of Old Lyme CT. I'd suggest you join, if for no other reason than to build up the anemic USA fleet, and to get the fabulous CYA newsletter. PM me for details. I'll send you few older newsletters.

    Scott
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  25. #1215
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
    When you start your shanty thread, would you please post a link here?
    Of course!!

    It's a "floating home" in a great location. My task will be to turn it from a cheap 1960's RV to a classic shanty boat. Challenge accepted!! At least it's WOOD!!!

    Y'all have seen what I can to with a classic, so this will be a test of how to make a plain Jane floating box with a walnut wood grain vinyl interior into a classic shanty boat.. I'm already planning!!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  26. #1216
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by MvInvader View Post
    ur better buying a nice 5 gallon bucket from home depot putting all ur money into it and lighting a match.

    Hmm. Really? Which boat should I torch? The classic 1929 wooden boat, or the houseboat in the unobtainium location? The houseboat was cheap, and will be an easy project. The other one has already burned up a ton of money, so I think I'll enjoy her for the next 30 years...
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  27. #1217
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Hmm. Really? Which boat should I torch? The classic 1929 wooden boat, or the houseboat in the unobtainium location? The houseboat was cheap, and will be an easy project. The other one has already burned up a ton of money, so I think I'll enjoy her for the next 30 years...
    i don't know what crawled up the other guys butt but I think you are living the dream! i'm a bit jealous.
    Tom

  28. #1218
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    OK, heads up everyone!

    I just started the new Shanty Boat thread for my Delta houseboat transformation project.

    You can find it here:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...21#post5648821

    See Y'all over there..

    Scott
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  29. #1219
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    On muh whey.
    This sig line is proudly provided by The Wooden Boat Magazine Forum. If it ain't The Wooden Boat Mag, it just a rag.

  30. #1220
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Still a list of things to do on MAKOTO before I dive into the Shanty boat. She is being hauled next month for bottom paint and hull topsides paint, and that will include a survey, so, just like you brush your teeth extra well before you go to the dentist, I have some loose ends to clean up before the surveyor comes to MAKOTO.

    Here's my list:

    1) I have had a chronic starting issue with the boat. The start battery is OK, but about 50% of the time when I turn the key I get a "click" with no turnover. I checked the start battery, and that's good. I am thinking it is the solenoid, so I am going to try changing that out. Anyone with any Yanmar experience care to chime in here? )

    2) When I initially wired the boat I used a couple of Blue Sea automatic charging relays. I never fully understood these, and have finally decided to remove them altogether. I had hoped that I could use these to have the alternator charge all of the batteries when underway, but we seldom cruise long distances (a few hours is long for us), and always have power where we are going, so there doesn't seem to be much need for automatically charging the house batteries from the alternator. I also suspect that this could have something to do with the starting problem. I have a manual switch that I can use to cross strap the batteries if need be.
    So, the ACRs are coming out.

    3) I have to paint the cabin overhead that I patched and sanded last week.

    4) Clean up the wiring and such for the Purasan install I did last year. Anyone have any idea why it doesn't always activate when the toilet input is activated? Seems like this happens about 60% of the time. I can activate the system by pressing the control pad button, but the toilet flush input is also supposed to activate it.

    Other tasks on my list (not survey critical):
    A) Rebuild the aft bench seat. We have found that it is too shallow for comfortable seating, so I am going to revise the sole, move the seat front forward, and rebuilt the lockers under the seat
    B) Fab and install a teak door on the helm side locker (The old one was a mess, and I never put it back in.. so there are diesel cans, and other junk showing amid the nice teak wheelhouse..
    c) Sand and re-finish the interior of the wheelhouse. I did the overhead a few years backhand that still looks great, but the rest has had only passing attention. It looks shabby compared to the overhead.

    Cheers,

    Scott
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  31. #1221
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Scott,
    When one does boat restoration as I used to, it is sometimes sad to see what happens to a boat after it leaves one's hands. It can take only a few months to screw up a classic boat. Fortunately, Makoto (ex Woodrow) has had good fortune with owners. And her luck continues with you.
    Couple things:
    1. The new handrails are a 100% improvement. They would look even better nickel or chrome plated. I would prefer nickel, but I assume the rest is chrome.
    2. When I worked on the boat, there was a plank on the starboard side, very roughly at the turn of the bilge. That plank had a huge seam...it seemed sound but you might pay some attention to the area.
    Good luck!

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Still a list of things to do on MAKOTO before I dive into the Shanty boat. She is being hauled next month for bottom paint and hull topsides paint, and that will include a survey, so, just like you brush your teeth extra well before you go to the dentist, I have some loose ends to clean up before the surveyor comes to MAKOTO.

    Here's my list:

    1) I have had a chronic starting issue with the boat. The start battery is OK, but about 50% of the time when I turn the key I get a "click" with no turnover. I checked the start battery, and that's good. I am thinking it is the solenoid, so I am going to try changing that out. Anyone with any Yanmar experience care to chime in here? )

    2) When I initially wired the boat I used a couple of Blue Sea automatic charging relays. I never fully understood these, and have finally decided to remove them altogether. I had hoped that I could use these to have the alternator charge all of the batteries when underway, but we seldom cruise long distances (a few hours is long for us), and always have power where we are going, so there doesn't seem to be much need for automatically charging the house batteries from the alternator. I also suspect that this could have something to do with the starting problem. I have a manual switch that I can use to cross strap the batteries if need be.
    So, the ACRs are coming out.

    3) I have to paint the cabin overhead that I patched and sanded last week.

    4) Clean up the wiring and such for the Purasan install I did last year. Anyone have any idea why it doesn't always activate when the toilet input is activated? Seems like this happens about 60% of the time. I can activate the system by pressing the control pad button, but the toilet flush input is also supposed to activate it.

    Other tasks on my list (not survey critical):
    A) Rebuild the aft bench seat. We have found that it is too shallow for comfortable seating, so I am going to revise the sole, move the seat front forward, and rebuilt the lockers under the seat
    B) Fab and install a teak door on the helm side locker (The old one was a mess, and I never put it back in.. so there are diesel cans, and other junk showing amid the nice teak wheelhouse..
    c) Sand and re-finish the interior of the wheelhouse. I did the overhead a few years backhand that still looks great, but the rest has had only passing attention. It looks shabby compared to the overhead.

    Cheers,

    Scott

  32. #1222
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Hey PC. Nice to see you.

    Yeah, when we had her out of the water at Rutherford's you could see daylight through that seam. As I recall it was just forward of the main bulkhead , starboard side right around the turn of the bilge. I can't recall what Jeremiah did with that, but I believe he splined in a new section of wood. There was quite a bit of that sort of non-visible structural stuff we did. One example were the stringers. The port side was rotted at the main bulkhead, so we cut it back about 4 feet and carefully scarfed in a new section. We had to remove one of the port side stringer sisters since it interfered with the bunks, so that ended up being another complex scarf of new wood across that area.

    So far, in terms of leaks, the biggest culprit are the garboard seams. The boat does not have a rabbeted keel (What Jeff Rutherford calls "floppy garboards"), and they seep all the time everywhere forward of the shaft log. Aft of these there are cheek pieces that create a land for the garboards, and there are no leaks there.

    So far, the only regret I have with the restoration is that I wish I had not put pitch in the bilges. It worked great for a few months, but over time, the garboard leaks resulted in great swelled blisters that eventually blocked the limber holes. I ended up hoping up the pitch to free the limber holes so the bolides could drain. At some point I plan to remove all of that crap and probably make some chamfered wood filler that imply screw down to the top of the keel ,and extend about 1/2 way up each garboard. I'll bed them in polysulfide and call it done. I don't mind a little bilge water, but the bubbly cracked pitch is a mess!.

    As we have discussed, the only chrome/nickel on the boat are the half-dorade vents, the cabin-top hatch, some window strips on the sides, and the portlights. All of the fairleads, cleats, anchor hardware, etc is all plain bronze. I was just at the Stephens rendezvous and SKAL was there (sister ship, one hull number newer). Her half-dorades are unplated, and none of her hardware is plated. I suspect that was how they were sold.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  33. #1223
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    OK, heads up everyone!

    I just started the new Shanty Boat thread for my Delta houseboat transformation project.
    I'm not goin' unless you promise green shag carpet, orange walls and lava lamps !

  34. #1224
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by on the border View Post
    I'm not goin' unless you promise green shag carpet, orange walls and lava lamps !
    Oh Yeah Baybeeee!!!!!

    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  35. #1225
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Perhaps the two boat projects of which I am most proud are in the Bay Area: Your boat and a 34ft. Chris Deluxe Enclose Cabin. Both were were in basically sound shape but had definitely seen better days. The Chris was purchased by a doc on the Peninsula.

    I went to school at UC and learned to sail on the Bay. Of course, there is no better daysailing than on the Bay. However, the choices regarding cruising grounds for motorboats seem to my likely uninformed opinion to be rather ascetic compared to what we have on Puget Sound and environs. Perhaps you could consider a truck trip for the old girl and a summer of cruising.

    We shall agree to disagree about the handrails...best to you/pcf

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Hey PC. Nice to see you.

    Yeah, when we had her out of the water at Rutherford's you could see daylight through that seam. As I recall it was just forward of the main bulkhead , starboard side right around the turn of the bilge. I can't recall what Jeremiah did with that, but I believe he splined in a new section of wood. There was quite a bit of that sort of non-visible structural stuff we did. One example were the stringers. The port side was rotted at the main bulkhead, so we cut it back about 4 feet and carefully scarfed in a new section. We had to remove one of the port side stringer sisters since it interfered with the bunks, so that ended up being another complex scarf of new wood across that area.

    So far, in terms of leaks, the biggest culprit are the garboard seams. The boat does not have a rabbeted keel (What Jeff Rutherford calls "floppy garboards"), and they seep all the time everywhere forward of the shaft log. Aft of these there are cheek pieces that create a land for the garboards, and there are no leaks there.

    So far, the only regret I have with the restoration is that I wish I had not put pitch in the bilges. It worked great for a few months, but over time, the garboard leaks resulted in great swelled blisters that eventually blocked the limber holes. I ended up hoping up the pitch to free the limber holes so the bolides could drain. At some point I plan to remove all of that crap and probably make some chamfered wood filler that imply screw down to the top of the keel ,and extend about 1/2 way up each garboard. I'll bed them in polysulfide and call it done. I don't mind a little bilge water, but the bubbly cracked pitch is a mess!.

    As we have discussed, the only chrome/nickel on the boat are the half-dorade vents, the cabin-top hatch, some window strips on the sides, and the portlights. All of the fairleads, cleats, anchor hardware, etc is all plain bronze. I was just at the Stephens rendezvous and SKAL was there (sister ship, one hull number newer). Her half-dorades are unplated, and none of her hardware is plated. I suspect that was how they were sold.

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