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Thread: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Ahh.. That was a satisfying little Memorial Day weekend...

    My galley cabinets are coming along. Most of the parts are in various stages of painting, but before I can install them, I needed to get the sole ready to be rebuilt. THis, of course meant taking up the sole boards. These were 5/8 doug fir nailed down to the floor timbers probably 50 years ago.. so up they went. I sawed a couple because I am not ready to redo the entire sole just yet. I have to have SOMETHING to walk on.

    What greeted me was the most disgusting mess I have yet encountered, and I am no stranger to disgusting messes! This was right on the scale with Nex7en's sex toy find.. only ickier.. Apparently back in time some PO had had a diesel stove. I had earlier found and removed the disused fuel pipe. Well, I guess these thigns are really as messy and nasty as they might seem. THe bilges were coated with about 1/4 inch (in some places up to an inch) of black sludge.

    Here is a picture of what I started with...



    And after hours of scraping, scrubbing with lemon juice and salt, and then paint.. here's what I ended the weekend with..



    THAT was the most disgusting job I think I have yet encountered...sort of like cleaning an old sewer...Glad its done.

    I have a bit more to do, but I am finally staring to put stuff back, as opposed to tearing crap out..

    Cheers!
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:02 PM.

  2. #37

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Looks great. I think that was just a build up of old sludge. My CC cruiser was in the same state when I pulled the engines. It was nasty sludgy old oily crap, I found a utility knife blade, some screws,pieces of wire, etc.

    Great work , great thread.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    More progress:

    After my fun weekend of scraping sludge from the bilges, I thought I'd change locales and media a little and scrape paint from the main bulkhead.

    The picture below is from an earlier post. It shows the fab multicolored multiple coats of paint on the bulkhead. I am especially fond of the orange latex, some PO's attempt to mimic Red Lead.. maybe a little unclear on the concept.... I was originally planning to just paint over this mess, since it is behind the back splash above the counter and represents the back of the galley cabinets below the counter. But then, a little voice called to me, reminding me that the Pixar folks "sand the bottoms of the drawers", and another pair of voices called out from a future owner 80 years in the future: One said, "I can't believe some PO just added another coat of paint to the hot mess (actually they used coarser terms..but this is a family forum). The other voice said. "Man, I can't believe some PO actually took the time to scrape 80 years of paint off this bulkhead, and then had the gall to paint over 300 year old first growth vertical grain Doug Fir..."



    I decided that the second voice was better.

    So, after about an hour or scraping with my trusty heat gun, here is the bulkhead:



    I have since removed the counter top so I can replace the support screwed to the bulkhead.
    Next up is sanding and paint!

    It's nice to be turning the corner and starting to put stuff back together again!

    Also, in the right side of the last photo you can see the new boards I installed to replace the rotted ones described in an earlier post.
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:03 PM.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Hi Scott,
    That is an impressive amount of work you've got done already! Love the clean bilge picture with what looks like a goodly stash of medicine cans. It must have been a real treat too to scrape all that galley bulkhead staving too! What is the dark staining on the lower ends of that staving, right in front of another medicine bottle? Water,oil or worse?

    Sanding will seem a dream after the hard work you've already done with the scraper et al.

    Continued success!!


    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Peter;
    Alas, that "medicine bottle" is actually my heat gun. It is designed so that it sits on its back when not in use, since the front part gets really really hot. I try to indulge in the amber elixir only after I have finished my work. It seems to go faster that way, and the quality is better too!

    I believe the dark satining is oil oil from the bilges. It is worst right where the diesel heater was located (as was the bilge crud). My guess is that some PO used the heater a lot, and over many years a drip here and a drip there added up to a lot. These boards terminate on the engine side (behind this bulkhead), so another explanation is oil from decades of dirty engines seeping up the end grain of the wood. I was also concerned that is might be rot, after my experience with the right side of this bulkhead, but, it is all very solid, so I think it is OK.

    As for progress, I have found that this boat a a bit like the cars I have restored. You have to maintain your pace, and do a little every day. Slow and steady seems to be better that periodic fits of superhuman work. ANd pretty soon, there is less and less to do! I am sure you are all to familiar with this drill!

    Cheers!
    S

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    I was originally planning to just paint over this mess, since it is behind the back splash above the counter and represents the back of the galley cabinets below the counter. But then, a little voice called to me, reminding me that the Pixar folks "sand the bottoms of the drawers", and another pair of voices called out from a future owner 80 years in the future: One said, "I can't believe some PO just added another coat of paint to the hot mess (actually they used coarser terms..but this is a family forum). The other voice said. "Man, I can't believe some PO actually took the time to scrape 80 years of paint off this bulkhead, and then had the gall to paint over 300 year old first growth vertical grain Doug Fir..."

    I decided that the second voice was better.
    A man after my own heart! I congratulate you, sir, for listening to that second, wiser voice and digging in with gusto. You have to be bloody, bold and resolute to undertake these kind of projects, and if you're going to do it, you might as well do it all the way and do it right - if you hadn't, it would bother you for the rest of your years using that boat - but you already know that, don't you.

    As JFK said about putting a man on the moon: "We choose to do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard." (Although, of course, he pronounced it "hahd").
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by ilikerust View Post
    ...if you hadn't, it would bother you for the rest of your years using that boat - but you already know that, don't you..
    exactly!!!

    S

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Spent a lovely evening sanding..

    Got the last bits of paint off the bulkhead (see above) ands then set to work on the teak door frame. Following Tom Freeman's lead, I want to clean this up and varnish it before I paint. I'll deal with the wet edge joint later. That's what 1000 grit paper is for...

    Yesterday I received my new galley drawers. The old drawers must have been done in the 60's. They had 1/8 masonite bottoms that had gone all wobbly, and had, jeez, must be 10 coats of paint. Looked like sh*t. I considered making them myself, but then found drawerdepot.com.. I was able to order custom sized dovetail drawer boxes made from white oak with white oak ply bottoms. The boxes are solid 5/8 oak, and the bottoms are 3/8 ply. I plan to do full varnished teak faces that will sit about 1/8 proud from the cabinet face with a slight round-over edge. These are "panel" drawers, so there is no lip covering the gap between the drawer and the cabinet...so you have to get it all right or it will look wonky...I decided to try the slides they offered. I am not totally sure how these will hold up on a boat, but, I can always replace them. The slides are soft close Blum under slides, so there is no hardware showing when the drawer is open.

    Here are a couple of pics of the boxes out of the box...



    ...and a detail of the nice joinery:



    I decided to try to get these to match the teak woodwork as best as I could, So, here is one drawer stained and compared to the teak grating I showed in an earlier post.



    and another...



    Next up... Varnish and paint!

    Cheers,
    S
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:04 PM.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Lovely boat and nice work man. I'll be following along.
    Chuck Thompson

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Here are some pics of the cabinets.

    The picture below shows the port side cabinet face. As you can see the old one (right) was worse for wear (especially after being removed from the galley).
    The added section on the left side is a separator to keep stuff in the adjacent cabinet from migrating into this one. The slats are to provide ventilation between the cabinets. Those with a keen eye will also see that I changed the teensy right side cabinet door (which was basically useless) into two drawers. The lower drawer will be very short because of the hull, so I'll make it a tilt open face rather than a sliding drawer. I also ditched the slide out cutting board, since all that did was take up space and get dirty.

    You can also see the difference between Sapele and African Mahogany. I fabbed the slatted side using African Mahogany, and the drawer side using Sapele. It was what I had lying around at the time. The Sapele is definitely nicer to work with. Much harder, cleaner cutting and cleaner sanding.



    The pic below shows the internal separator that provides a base for the drawer (see above) supports and the cabinet, so the drawer sides are isolated from the cabinet.



    The pic below shows how I fabbed this separator.. I seriously considered doing it in ply, but with the curved edges it seemed easier to just spline bopards and make it solid. More period correct too.





    Cheers.
    S
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:05 PM.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I cant see the pics in post 43 or 45. Is it just me? Also, Cogeniac, you may want to reduce your pictures somewhat because they take a long time to load when they ar so big. If you use photobucket, you just double click on the pic and then select "resize" from the options at the top.

    Again--lovely boat
    Chuck Thompson

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    OK Chuck. I resized all of my pictures. I use my own company web site to host the pics, so I just resized them and uploaded them again. Let me know if you still can't see some of them.

    Scott

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I can see!! Thanks. Great work. Love the drawers--good call
    Chuck Thompson

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Spent a long day doing this and that on the boat. It's raining like hell here (I thought this was summer!).

    Most of the day was spent stripping door frames, filling holes and sanding the bulkhead, etc.

    However, the big news is that I found a solution to the 1 million little hard flakes of old paint in the overhead beams. Tom Freeman and others had suggested the dental pick approach, so I got me some dental picks and started pickin'. After about 5 minutes, I realized that by the time I finished this, the boat would probably need to be restored again! That, and all the picking was tearing up the surface of the beams. So, I got some paint remover, and a small stainless steel wire brush. I carefully painted on the remover and went and sanded something.. After about 10 mins, I took the small wire brush and started scrubbing,. Amazing.. the remover had loosened these little dried flakes, and the brush just pulled them out. I found that hard scrubbing with the brush cleaned out the grain and also evaporated the remover, so, in about 10 minutes or less, I had a pristine clean white oak beam! I then stained it and applied Epifanes Matte. I'll take pics tomorrow (I didn't bring my camera today, anticipating a lot of dust). The stain is the same stuff I used on the drawers (see previous post). So the beams are the same basic color as the teak. The wire brushing cleared out the paint and some of the softer wood in the grain, so the beams will need about 5 coats of varnish to properly fill the grain, but the overall result is 1000% better than it was, and I didn't have to spend the rest of my life scratching away little paint flakes.

    At this rate, I should have all the beams done by next weekend. That means I can strip the inside of the cabin (OH! Joy!) and varnish everything properly. Then I'll paint.

    I also found a section of rot in one of the beam ends (right above the rotted bulkhead boards; see previous post). I scraped out the bad wood, and then spent about an hour carefully shaping a filler piece from white oak (nobody told me boat work was like dentistry!). I have recently sharpened my plane and my chisels using the Lie Nielsen sharpening kit. OMG, these suckers are sharp. Cut my left index finger twice with just a tiny slip of the blade..so the patch and I are blood brothers...(the red stain is inside, so it doesn't show...)

    S
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 06-04-2011 at 07:46 PM.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Yeah--be carefull where your left hand is when your right one holds them chisels. I've learned the hard way too.
    Chuck Thompson

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Well, I finally found my camera cable...

    In my last few posts, I was describing the wonderful process of restoring the deck beams.

    These had been badly stained using heavy stain that had not been rubbed off. The result looked a little like Faux wood.

    Here is a sample:



    Once I sanded this all of, I discovered why they had been stained so heavily. Some joker back in time had painted the beams mint green, and then white...As you can see in the photo below, the grain was riddled with little flecks of green paint. I tried to pick this out with a dental pick and quickly realized that it would take about 20 years to do all the beams. Wire brushing had no effect, nor did more sanding (although I suppose I would have simply sanded off 1/6 inch of oak and gotten the paint along with it.



    What I ended up doing was using paint remover and a wire brush. I'd paint on the remover, let it sit for 5-10 mins and then scrubbed with a small stainless steel brush. This seemed to do the trick.

    Here are a couple of photos of the beams after being wire brushed and then stained.





    And here is a group shot of the galley set




    The cabinets are coming along too. I'll post those next.

    Cheers,
    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:06 PM.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    One thing I have found working on my boat is that my approach to addressing issues has taken on a much more long term focus. at 83 years, this boat has had a lot of work done on her. Some of it very well done, and some of it absolute crap.

    When I first acquired her, I thought I was a competent wood butcher, I mean how hard could it be? It turns out I am now ashamed of the work I did back then.

    Here is an example:

    When I first got the boat, the companionway step was junk. It was weirdly shaped and looked to be made of a piece if an old dining table. It abutted a cabinet that had a big open area with wires and other junk, and some sliding doors that were constantly falling out of their sliders. I fixed the sliders properly, but...for the cabinet, I got me some teak veneer ply and set about remaking the cabinet and the step. You can see some pics of this in the two pictures (previously posted) below. The part in question is the "cabinet" that looks like it was part of an RV...



    ...and here:



    With the adjacent cabinets all being replaced. I decided it was time to restore my 14 month old restoration...

    So, I fabricated a new cabinet from actual teak. This will fit under the sliding doors and will form the side of a new step. The large opening has a teak door that will use the same teak gratings I showed in an earlier post, only here it will be teak-on-teak, not teak on white. The door opens out and down. I think I'll make a wine rack inside.

    These photos are of the dry fitted un-glued assembly. I'll post others with the door after I sand all of it.



    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:07 PM.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Scott, I empathize with your long term approach. I took a couple of shortcuts in year 1 that I have now redone correctly. I think that if there is a chance that I may be spending my quiet time looking at the craftsmanship for the rest of my active life, then I may as well be proud of looking at it. I can't always make it perfect, but I can do my best.
    Last edited by Tom Freeman; 08-02-2011 at 12:24 AM.
    She requires of her owner a custodial obligation and responsibility that has absolutely nothing to do with financial return on investment or annual cost of maintaining and operating her.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I admire anyone crazy enough to undertake these sort of long term restorations and actually pull it off very convincingly.All the nitty gritty work you folks do(talking to both Scott and Tom here) is amazing but your results are absolutely worth it! I'm way too lazy and chicken-****e to ever dive in that deep.

    Very nice work Scott and continued happy success with your boat!!(you too Tom! )


    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I finally got around to gluing, sanding and varnishing the cabinet in the posts above.

    Here is a pic with the old one it is replacing.

    So, this would be different.



    Also, I spent some quality time sanding the old counters. I forgot to take "before" pics, so this will have to do. You can see the general state of the counter by the un-sanded section at the top.



    And here is the counter after the first coat of Epifanes Matte. I test fitted the new faucet, just to see how it would look.



    Cheers...

    Scott
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:07 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I can hear the boat breathing a deep sigh of relief all the way out here in Virginia.
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Sooooo.....hiding all the way down behind some pages for so long.How have things been coming along Scott and/or are you back in the water and enjoying some lovely sunny weather?


    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I need a faucet like that, Scott. Where did you find that one? Nice work on the cabinet!

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Sorry to be out of touch. Slowly making progress, but working 12 hour days at work for the past 2 months.. I SO need a vacation!

    Got all the cabin beams stripped of their mint green residue, added a 1/8 teak "veneer" to the head cabin sides (too far gone to restore), and finished most of the cabinets. Just no pics yet.

    Tom; the Faucet is made in Italy by Nicolazzi, and marketed by Rohl.
    Rohl Part No. A1635XMPN-2, Nicolazzi part no. B1635NKL08.

    It is finished in polished nickel

    Cheers.

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Awesome. Thanks for the tip!
    She requires of her owner a custodial obligation and responsibility that has absolutely nothing to do with financial return on investment or annual cost of maintaining and operating her.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    OK folks;
    It has been a while since I posted anything. I have just been so busy with work this summer. But I have found time to sneak off the the boat and have made some progress. I'll post some pics of the interior restoration this weekend.

    For now...

    When I got the boat is had some cheap brass plated lamps that didn't have any shades. The lamps in the cabin are mounted to vertical pieces that tie the boards that form the sides of the cabin together. These were hollowed out on the back to accommodate the wires. The cheap lamps had bases that were wider than these elegant little 1 x 2 teak boards, and the boards had been workled over by many previous owners. Here is a pic of the port side board (I had to remove it by drilling out the bungs on the outside of the cabin.. that was fun.. ). As you can see, this piece is beyond repair.



    We also found some very pretty nickel plated bronze art deco lamps on eBay. Made in France in 1930 (when MAKOTO was brand new). I got them from an antique dealer in the Netherlands. These have nice narrow bases that will fit the vertical strips nicely. So, I had to figure out how to mount these suckers. Here is one of the lamps (like my on-thefly first aid treatment? man that chisel is sharp!)



    The bases had just a small strap across the back. I suspect they were meant to be attached to some sort of hook. However, this was not likely to be too stable in the marine environment. So, I chiseled out a small block of wood that just barely snapped into place under the strap, and then potted it in place with some thickened epoxy. This is how the back looks now.



    I then set about remaking the mounts. I wanted to properly wire these, and the wires are supposed to come up from the bottom (they hide under a large moulding strip that runs under the vertical mounts). I also wanted to avoid any future need to do surgery on the teak exterior of the boat, so I fabbed a two-piece mount that has a stationary piece that serves the role of strapping the cabin side together, and an exterior cover that serves to hold the lamp and cover the wires. This was fun to make! The Afrormosia inner is very strong, and will be screwed to the cabin. As you can see I cut a shallow groove in the base to run the wire.



    And here they are from the front in comparison to the old piece.



    I then drilled the backs of the covers and mounted the lamps. The covers are screwed to the bases using small bronze screws from the side.

    And here is the finished, as yet to be varnished, pair with the lamps installed.

    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:09 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Very smart, indeed!! I wholeheartedly approve!! (As if you needed my approval...)
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Elegant solution Scott and very pretty lamps! Bravo on that score!!



    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    nice work. I like that you pulled out your earlier work that you were unhappy with and redid it. That kind of thing ends up driving you crazy later. When I built the cabinets for the bathroom in my last house I made one drawer front that I wasn't happy with but left it because of time constraints. 2 years later I was sitting on the toilet and that stupid drawer front was driving me nuts...

    That's a really nice boat
    Fish and ships or is that chips

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Well, it has been a long time since I posted any work. I was very busy over the summer, and work on the boat has been pretty much the same process of varnishing sanding and painting.


    At the start of summer I decided to replace the teak ring that supported the deck hatch. This hatch is basically an 18 inch diameter port hole that sits flat on the deck. It serves as a vent, and skylight, and, I suppose, an escape hatch. The teak ring to which it was mounted was pretty sad. It was thin and in bad condition, and had too modern of a look. The inside part was simply laminated ply that had been painted, so it looked sort of like a plastic bezel. Totally out of place in the cabin. So I had a guy in Florida make a new one. His web site showed that he made lots of teak bits. I drew up some plans and he agreed to fab it.


    A key problem with the existing ring was that since the top and bottom were two separate pieces, the deck in between showed, and it's not pretty...so the new ring was designed with a rabbet top and bottom so that I could fill the space in between.


    Here is the design sketch.





    Here are a couple of fuzzy photos of the rough result. This is both rings together. If you look hard inside the ring, you can see the rabbet.






    I have since curved the top of the inside ring and the bottom of the outside ring to fit the curved deck top, and they are now varnished.


    I'll post pics of that as soon as I take some.


    So, what remained, aside from finishing the overhead paint so I could attach the rings, was to fab the filler piece between them. I had made the rabbet 3/8 inch wide (so, where the ring opening is 18 inches in diameter, the rabbet section is 18 3/4.


    So I fabbed a nice bending form made from plywood rounds I got from OSH. This is shown below.





    I also cobbled together a steamer made from a big pot borrowed from my neighbor, a piece of vent flashing and an aluminum dryer hose. This contraption is shown in the next pic.





    I had bought some 3 inch by 1/8 inch by 60 inch teak a while back (from Rockler), and put the widest piece in the steamer for an hour or so.



    To be continued
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-12-2011 at 12:00 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I finally got up the nerve and clamped one end in place. I slowly bent the board around the from. It was a little weird since it was stiff, but with steady pressure it yielded and didn't crack! Here is a pic part way through the process.



    And here is a nice closeup.





    And another picture of the whole thing.





    I followed this up with two additional boards that went outside this one. and then cooked the whole thing for a bit over the steam pot.





    Next up I will laminate these together using the rings themselves as the form, and glue it into the lower ring. THen I'll carefully trim the top until the upper ring just mates with it when it is on the deck.


    Cheers.
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 10-11-2011 at 11:57 PM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    790

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Cool.
    She requires of her owner a custodial obligation and responsibility that has absolutely nothing to do with financial return on investment or annual cost of maintaining and operating her.

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,457

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Hey Tom;

    Quick question:

    How did you avoid bleed-under on your tape lines when painting white up against the beams? I tried Frog Tape and still got some spots where the paint sucked under. I finally took to doing the edges freehand, but I can't imagine doing that for all of the beams...

    Thanks
    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    790

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    We used only the 3M Delicate blue tape for masking. On a nice varnished or painted surface, you will get no bleed under if you apply it and then burnish the edges. Another trick is to apply it, and then paint over the edge with a thin coat of the underlying finish to seal the edge. Then paint your top coat of the different finish over that.
    She requires of her owner a custodial obligation and responsibility that has absolutely nothing to do with financial return on investment or annual cost of maintaining and operating her.

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    7,470

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I'll second Toms' method, since Nat said that was how she did it too Nice work on that laminated ring Scott! Almost makes me want to try one myself!

    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

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