Page 11 of 37 FirstFirst ... 10111221 ... LastLast
Results 351 to 385 of 1279

Thread: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

  1. #351
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Devonport, Auckland NZ
    Posts
    1,264

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Nice - very nice.
    What Sunbrella is it?
    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  2. #352
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    790

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    That banquette set-up is really nice. I love how it converts into a dining area. I can say from experience that deciding not to go is a hard call, but better to save the boat and crew for another day. I can also say from experience that being in a dodgy spot without power and steerage is not to be recommended.
    She requires of her owner a custodial obligation and responsibility that has absolutely nothing to do with financial return on investment or annual cost of maintaining and operating her.

  3. #353
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    @ Tom;

    Yeah it was a hard call, but its and 83 year old boat, and she needs care and attention. I have noticed more seepage and bilge activity since this episode, so I think we were testing her limits, Not something I am obliged to do on a regular basis!

    With an old boat caution is the better part of valor. We had a throughly enjoyable day today, tinkering in the marina, having friends over, etc.

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  4. #354
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Pablo Bay, CA
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Sorry I missed you on my port side at the Show. I departed at 6AM Saturday and it was ugly but I was already soaked within 20 minutes so why turn back! Should have not gone in hindsight... Did the same this morning at 6 AM. Was not great, ugly in the typical spots but had the wind, waves "rollers" and tide with me.

    The show was great and the people were wonderful.

    Here are a few photos:
    https://picasaweb.google.com/1136153...eat=directlink

    Mike
    Last one - 1961 32' Chris-Craft Connie; between boats... for now!

  5. #355
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    33,047

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Thanks for the pics! Much appreciated & some fine looking boats.

  6. #356
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Mike;

    Sorry to not have been there to meet you in person.

    I have concluded that any time there is any wind on San Pablo Bay, it is bad. My other observation is that USUALLY, the west wind doesn't start until about 2 PM, so AM cruising is often like glass. However, when it blows, the SOUTH wind blows pretty much all day. After the Stockton event, we left Benicia at 6 AM and it sucked the whole way to the Petaluma river. The wind was coming off Pinole point making these roiling sweeping waves, and if you are going against them it is nasty. Going with them is messy, but much easier. On Friday, the wind was coming straight at us from Pinole/San Rafael, and by the time it had built up all the way across the bay, we had 5 foot breaking swells on the bow. The channel is relatively narrow, so you couldn't get much angle on them before you would run out of water...I have never seen north SP bay that bad.

    You should send the pic with the line of CYA burgees to Nancy Clothier (or send it to me and I'll forward it to Nancy). That would be a nice pic for the newsletter!

    Scott
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  7. #357
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    As some of you may recall we aborted our second try at going to San Rafael last weekend. On our second run we got about 2 miles down river and started hearing a loud knocking sound in back. with my had on the rudder post, I could feel something impacting the rudder, and there was a random knocking sound.

    Today we had a diver come out and have a look...



    Here's what he found.



    Fortunately, no damage was done, and the diver was pretty cheap... so much for low tide excursions!!!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  8. #358
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    So I have been slowly finishing a million little things on MAKOTO.

    A few weeks ago I stripped the head door, planning to refinish it. Much to my chagrin the door is VG doug fir instead of teak, but it appears to be original, so I am reluctant to change it out for a new teak door (not to mention that a teak door would be pretty expensive). I initially found that it was too small for the opening. The result twas that the latch hardware had been shimmed out from the door jamb so the door would latch. I removed all the hardware, stripped the door and added a thin piece of VG Doug fir to the hinge side so I can properly fit it.

    I also found that after removing the giant mirror that had been attached to it, the main panel in the door was really wavy flat sawn DF ply. While this isn;t necessarily bad, it has NOTHING to do with anything else on the boat. Here are a few pics of this.





    After a lot of searching and a few false starts, I found some VG DF ply veneer. THis is regular veneer, but it comes in 4x8 sheets and the play is backed with thin mahogany or some such thing. This was much easier since the first veneer I found was pretty, but it had to be pieced vertically, and that turned out to be very difficult (the VG tended to split along the grain, so getting a tight edge to edge joint was nearly impossible.

    Here is the veneer from the front side



    And the back side



    I carefully cut and edge sanded the pieces so the fit perfectly into the door panels.

    Here is the door being glued. I used veneer resin glue and made a mahogany ply panel to press it in place. The weights are pieces of marble my neighbor had, along with a marble face I carved in Carrara Italy when I was 9 years old (my uncle is a sculptor...lives in Italy).



    And here is the finished product. I plan to fit the door, stain everything to a uniform tone, and varnish over the next week.



    Cheers,

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  9. #359
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Makoto gets her annual varnish job...I am SO glad I had Mikael do this. He is so much better at this than me!









    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  10. #360
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Cedarville, New Jersey
    Posts
    1,098

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Beautiful. It makes me wish I was currently involved in a wooden boat restoration instead of an aluminum Burger.
    Fish and ships or is that chips

  11. #361
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    OK, so summer is over, the bunks and interior stuff is all varnished (I'lll post pics tomorrow), and I just set up the router table to make coving to finish the cabin sole. Dropped a pile o'cash on some teak to finish the sole panels, and ordered some very sweet bronze hatch pulls from Bristol Bronze. So I should have the cabin finally done (after 2 1/2 years of work!!!) in a couple of weeks!! Can't wait!

    For those who may have forgotten, the bunks have a coved base as shown here (look at the base of the post).



    The plan is to make teak frames that fit flush to these cove pieces on all four sides (with maybe 1/16 clearance for swelling), and then plank the tops inside the frame with 1/4 inch teak strips. I found 3 inch by 1/4 inch strips at Rockler, which, while relatively expensive ($20/sf), come pre planed to dimension, so it is probably faster and cheaper overall to do it this way than to try to resaw lumber to these dimensions. The waste alone would turn $30/BF teak into $50/BF strips...

    Here is a drawing of a typical panel.



    More pics soon!
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  12. #362
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Here are few pics of the current sole project. These sections are canted up as a result of the turn of the bilge. There is also a large stringer crossing the area. So I decided to frame in the areas on each side of the stringer, and then I'll fill these frames with ply bottoms and 3" x 1/4" teak strip inserts. The stringer will be covered with a removable 1/4" panel that will have the edges rounded over. I'll probably fit the floor inserts, and then flatten the stringer using epoxy filler (it is rounded over from decades of folks stepping on it). The the cover will be secure and supported everywhere.






    1/4" teak arrives next week, so it should be a veritable party of teak sole making...

    Here also is a poor pic (i was using my phone for these) of the cabin posts and the bulkhead trim.



    Cheers.

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  13. #363
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    7,471

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser




    Hi Scott,

    I've been wondering for awhile now, if you wouldn't happen to have a close up picture of your mast,as seen in the above picture.In particular, the junction area of the mast and yard. I have to make a mast myself and need hope or ideas on how to join these two parts.

    Hope your weather is warm,sunny and not too windy!



    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  14. #364
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Hi Peter;

    The weather has been fabulous right up to about 2 days ago, and since, it has been pissing down rain...It had to come...

    Funny you should ask about the mast. I am aiming to replace it. If you are interested, I might send the one currently on Makoto to you. It needs some TLC, but it is pretty workable. It is just a wee bit modern for Makoto.

    Here is a pic of the mast of her sister ship.








    As you can see, this is a more period correct design. This one has a hinged base, so it can be lowered, which is useful at times.

    Makoto's current mast is basically a hollow(ish) post that sits on a block of mahogany that has a dowel screwed to it. The dowel registers the mast in place, and it is held on by its three guy wires.

    It leaks. I think the proper way to do it would be to remake the base so that it has a nice routed out groove around the underside of the base for filling with Dolfinite. Then screw a bronze pipe nipple into a blind hole in the top (maybe a 1 inch by 3 inch nipple). Then fill the mast bottom to just fit the nipple (maybe even embed the nipple in epoxy so that the mast screws onto it). Then I would route the anchor light wire through a small hole in the block and through the nipple, filling the nipple with caulk to seal the wire.

    I will probably be remaking Makoto's mast over the winter (including having those nice bronze bits cast..yikes!!), so let me know if you are interested, and I'll take some more detailed photos of the current mast.

    Cheers,
    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  15. #365
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    So, while I have not been posting much, things have been progressing.

    As some may recall, last spring I framed out the sole areas with a coved edge around the bunks, and a few dividers. Here is a pic of that.



    I finally got around to finishing the sole.

    I started by buying a bunch of 1/4" teak lumber from Rockler (a good source of very nice thin teak).

    Here is what came via UPS.



    I used a 1/4" board to mark all of the ply inserts in the first photo above with a line 1/4" in from the surrounding framing. I then carefully cut the ply inserts to these scribed lines. I did this by hand on the table saw cutting slightly wide of the line, and then cleaned up the edges on the jointer.

    Using some other lumber I had, I milled a bunch (88 feet!!) of "L" shaped edges, and epoxied these to the sides of the ply inserts, as so.



    I initially left these wild at the ends, and then trimmed them flush.



    I then took another piece of the "L" edging and, using a sharp pencil and a rule, scribed the inset line as shown.



    I then used my trusty Japanese pull saw and cut along the 1/4" edge on the inside.




    To be continued...
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  16. #366
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    This yielded the following cut on the outside...



    I finished this cut up to the scribed line...



    And then cut the scribed line to remove a section of the piece.



    A little clean up with a chisel, and it fit perfectly. I glued these in place with West, leaving the ends wild. Once the epoxy was cured, I trimmed and sanded the ends flush.



    I repeated this operation 32 times, to get a set of eight panels of various sizes and shaped like this.



    After some planing and sanding... (OK, there's a special mitered piece in that mix.. more on that later...



    To be continued...
    Last edited by Cogeniac; 11-19-2012 at 02:47 AM.
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  17. #367
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    If you recall a few posts back, I had a stack of 1/4 teak boards...

    I ripped those to about 2 1/2 inches wide , and then very carefully trimmed them to exactly fit inside the 1/4" high frame formed around each of the panels by the "L" moldings.

    I set this up by putting the blank panels in the boat and drawing a line down the center of the set. I then registered the filler planks on that line so the boards on each panel will line up with the boards on the other panels.

    Here is a sample.



    The edges were challenging since on three of the panels the edges are tapered, so I had to cut and trim tapered pieces to fit. I did this by hand on the table saw, again cutting wide of the line, and then cleaned up the edges with a jointer, and finessed them in place with a plane.

    Today, I epoxied these planks down using some nice oak legs timbers I had in the garage. I ran out of clamps, so I could only glue them two at a time.



    So a few more days of gluing and we will be ready to test fit the sole!

    Whew! I have been thinking about this, and working on bits of it for a year!

    Cheers,

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  18. #368
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    7,471

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    It must smell mighty fine in your sole building shop! I really like the ordour of teak. How thick is that plywood you have glued the teak to and did you do anything special to the teak before gluing it? I'm just curious since I have only been told how very difficult it is to epoxy teak because of its' high natural oil content. Don't have any experience with it, as such.

    Nevertheless Scott, it will be a lovely sole and following your step-by-step photos has me wondering about re-doing my own sole. Not any time soon mind you, but it would make a nice renovation project years down the road when I am good and fed up with the mahogany presently in place.

    I'm still looking at the mast, real hard like....will let you know what comes out of my hard looking soon.


    Carry on with the fine,fine,fussy work!


    Cheers!



    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  19. #369
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    I have not had any issues gluing teak. And, at this point, I have glued a lot of it! In my earlier days, I had read all the same tales of woe, so I would carefully wipe down the teak with denatured alcohol, but having missed that step a few times with no ill results, I have given that up.

    The original floors were 5/8 lumber, horrid stuff with about 1/2 inch of diesel soot and bilge scum on the bottom side. They can be this thin because they rest on floor timbers that are only about 12 inches apart. With my 6' 2 frame, headroom in the cabin is a premium, so I kept the floors the same height. What this meant was 3/8 Hydrotek ply laminated with 1/4" teak. The result is very stiff and also not too heavy.

    In a month or so, I will be doing a similar project on the salon and wheelhouse. Since this is somewhat larger, and the panels are only supported around their edges, they are 3/4 DF ply. I'll do a similar teak edge as above and inset 3/8 T&G teak, so those panels will finish out at 1 1/8" thick.

    The hardest part of this is really getting the panels correctly sized (there are no square corners on a boat). Cutting the teak inserts a a bit scary, but only because of the cost of a screwup. I'll probably start with the longest panels first, so I can use the cutoffs and screwups on the shorter panels. That said, I only cut one of the teak boards too short on the cabin panels, so it isn't that hard.


    Cheers

    S
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  20. #370
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Devonport, Auckland NZ
    Posts
    1,264

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Karylmatt View Post
    It is a common sense that gold is very percious and now more and more people like the gold metal, and more and more people now join ge group of hunting for treasure and gold. This is like the "gold rush". But what is different form before is that now people use more advanced equippmemt to help them to find the gold. And it seems among different equippments, people like the gold metal detectors most, because that such a device can help them to identify the detail information of the metal so that people can find it in a short time.
    WTF?
    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  21. #371
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    33,047

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Unfortunate advertising troll. Ignore it & it will go away

  22. #372
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    2,584

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Aww, and here I thought he was talking about my woodwork!

    Somehow, I don't think that metal detectors are very useful for finding gold...
    Now is a good time!


    Steward of MAKOTO [WB Magazine #232], and Honored Member of the LPBC

  23. #373
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    33,047

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Nice work!

    I bet you're giving thanks that it's done....

  24. #374

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    They look awesome... nice work.

  25. #375
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Devonport, Auckland NZ
    Posts
    1,264

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Very nice - like the lamp.
    Is it hinged?

    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  26. #376
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    7,471

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Pretty fancy stuff Scott! I am impressed by the complexity(to me) of the work required.
    Thanks for posting the close ups of the masts. It gave me a better understanding of what I do not have right on my own mast build.
    Which brings me to the next subject. Thanks for the generous offer of the old mast but I already started my mast out of mahogany and, wood butcher that I am, did not consult or research enough before jumping in. I shoulda waited....


    I enjoy watching how thoroughly you plan each project for your boat. It inpsires me!!



    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  27. #377
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    7,471

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post

    Peter;
    Good on you for doing it yourself. The mast I have is doubtless less nice than what you will make. How are you approaching it?
    Cheers.
    S



    Well, how did I approach it? I'm almost embarrassed to say this but.....pretty much by the seat of my pants. I'm slowly working my way toward a photo essay of my miscreant mast over on my build thread. Perhaps in a week or two, I'll be there. Just to keep the suspense level high though, I think I discovered a new way to round a square!

    Good luck with your searches for bronze tube. Very crafty of you and as I said previously, I shoulda waited before embarking on my own mast build for your inspirational work.

    That'll learn me to always be rushing things!



    Cheers!



    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  28. #378
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    33,047

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by P.L.Lenihan View Post
    That'll learn me to always be rushing things!

    Will it? Really?

  29. #379
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    33,047

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Sounds great! Grab expertise wherever you can. However, brazing is not difficult & actually very satisfying. I will admit that having a good torch makes all the difference....

  30. #380
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Wellington, NZ
    Posts
    663

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    They were a bit rough as supplied especially the pins. I hope the price was right.

  31. #381
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    7,471

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post



    Now to fit these fiddly little bastards in the nice teak panels....

    Cheers.

    S


    Not certain you need any ideas about installing those lovely pulls Scott, but if you go about half way or so down this page, you can get a look at how I did mine,

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-it-%29/page41


    be inspired my friend!


    Cheers!



    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  32. #382
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    1,826

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Sweetness itself!
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  33. #383
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    33,047

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Quote Originally Posted by Cogeniac View Post
    Well, that was fun, in a morbid sort of way!!

    Cheers,
    S
    You sir, are a patient & self-forgiving man. I would've turned the air blue for at least a day & taken 3 days to come back to it.

    Well done!

  34. #384
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    1,826

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    Serously - I would have blistered the paint off the walls with what would have come flying out of my piehole had I done that.

    Not that I've ever done such a thing. Nosirree, not me. Nope. I've never messed up any of my woodworking projects.

    And yet the paint in my workshop does seem to have a few blisters...
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  35. #385
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wilton, CT
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Restoring a 1929 Stephens Cruiser

    This should make you feel better:

    When I'm catching up on a thread I go to the last page to start reading. Only the two "mistake" pictures were on the page. I kept looking at them and thinking "mistake, what mistake is he talking about?" I couldn't see a thing wrong and had to trace the thread back to see what had happened.

    Keep up the great work!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •