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Thread: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

  1. #351
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    Hay Stephane, how's fatherhood treating you?

    So far (knock on wood, scratch a stay, turning, turning, turning, "may the lords and saints preserve us") we are getting it done without the extra step of steaming. Part of our success may be due to leaving the clamps on the plank ends after it is fastened for about three days. Giving the wood a little time to learn their shape before putting all the load on the fastners. The plank ends in the rabbit keep their clamp for a week. It is a little something I learned down here. I suspect that we will need to start steaming as we get closer to the bildge where there is much more twist and bend. Capt. Z.
    Not bad thanks, he did sleep a entire 6 hours yesterday night it felt like I woke up after 2 weeks on vacation After some intensive work it's around every 3 hours usually.

    It's a interesting idea about the clamps worth to know. For me I kind of like steaming now, once the set up is done it's really not long. I start the steamer when doing the bevel of the plank (Last thing I do on the planks), once done the steamer is ready so I throw the plank in. During that time I gather all the clamps, prepare the surface, clean a bit and 45 minutes later I put the plank in. It's a lot faster and easier with a plank steamed, I broke about 15 clamps when I was doing it without steaming and those are heavy 4" clamps. The steel rod kind of eat the cast iron body over time with lot's of pressure (Even with grease), and the cast iron body twist out of shape over time too...

    Anyway that's me, keep me updated on your Nicaragan way would be interetesting to know!
    http://www.peacefuljourney.ca/
    BEWARE: I am a native french speaker

  2. #352
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Another day in the boatyard over and I thought I would see what is happening on the WBF (well actually, I just wanted to see if anyone said anything on my thread.....ssiighhhh, nothing....bummer). So I spent the morning measuring where the main mast will go, and where it will go up through the deck, it sits at a 15* degree angle relative to the waterline. Which makes it 7* degree angle on the mast step. Then I figured out where it exits the deck and where the deck beams would be relative to the the mast. The original deck beams 2x3 and were 12 inches on center and had a plywood sub deck with a teak overlay. The new deck beams are 3x3, (and absolutely no plywood near this deck, much less this schooner.) when I laid out the new ones at 12 inch on center they only had eight inches of space in-between them, and this looked very crowded. I looked up Nevins's scantling rules, it specified 12.5 inches of space between beams so I tried 12 inches and looked much better. It will also facilitate deck prisms much better this way. Then I got three more deck beams fitted this afternoon. They are only cut to fit athwart ship, the trimming of the bedding will be done after they are all in place past the foremast so that I am comfortable with the spacing in relation to the mast and the butterfly hatch in between them. Then I will trim the bed and bolt them in place. I forgot my camera today so I could not take pictures. But I'll take some tomorrow. I still am debating on how big of a butterfly hatch to but on the deck between the mast. I am thinking about 3feet athwart ship and 4 or 5 feet for and aft. If I remember right the distance between the mast is 13.5 feet. This would leave about 4 3/4 or 4 1/4 feet between each mast and the butterfly hatch. I have the idea to build a dingy rack to house the dingy over the hatch, while making passages. I'm of a mind to have the dingy right side up with a battened cover to shed water and make it possible to store the oars and dingy's sail and mast inside the dingy. And right side up will allow the butterfly hatches to be opened with the dingy in place. Where as if it were upside down on the hatch, it will have no light or air until the dingy is removed. Any suggestions on the hatch size out there. I was thinking that if it was large enough to pass the stove out through it then it would be big enough for anything on the boat to get in or out. Anyone? Capt. Z.

  3. #353
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    OK I'll say something......been watching for some time now and constantly impressed by the size of the job, how you are doing it and what will be a great outcome.

    Cheers
    Mike

  4. #354
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    ...I have the idea to build a dingy rack to house the dingy over the hatch, while making passages. I'm of a mind to have the dingy right side up with a battened cover to shed water and make it possible to store the oars and dingy's sail and mast inside the dingy. And right side up will allow the butterfly hatches to be opened with the dingy in place. Where as if it were upside down on the hatch, it will have no light or air until the dingy is removed...
    If the dinghy rack is high enough, you might be able to stow the dinghy upside down and still have room to open the butterfly hatch, plus have a bit of extra protection for the hatch.
    The only drawback that I can think of, is if the hatch needs to be usable as a 'secondary egress' for Coast Guard regulations...this was an issue for the schooner Sultana, IIRC.

    One other thing...just because you don't see lots of responses, don't worry! Lots of us are following this thread (and wishing we were there to help!)!

    Tom

  5. #355
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    heck yea, I look in everyday.

  6. #356
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Mike, Tom, Wiz, and all the rest thanks for letting me know your watching.
    Here is the string theory in action! If you already know this just skip down to the pictures, I know that's what you do! No one reads the articles, everyone just wants more pictures. So if your still reading here is string theory. A gravitationally oriented string(we like to call this the gravitationally oriented string) is hung over the mast step. Now at deck level two strings are tied athwart ship parallel to each other (about a foot apart) (we like to call these athwart ship string 'A', and athwart ship string 'B') place a bubble level at both athwart ship string 'A' and athwart ship string 'B', to verify the deck is level. If it is not then the degree out of plum must be added or subtracted from the theoretical angle of the relationship of the gravitationally oriented string and the mast string. Unless the deck at this point is not intended to be level with the waterline in which case calculations must be adjusted to compensate for the differences. But I am getting ahead of myself. So, then another string is then nailed to the center of the spot where the mast will one day reside rooted in Brazilian cherry with a silver dollar under it's heel and a truck on it's head (we like to call this one the mast string). Now the mast string is tied to an other string running fore and aft (we like to call this one the fore and aft string)such that the mast string it can be run fore and aft. This part is not in the picture.

    Now the mast string is moved fore and aft (on the fore and aft string) till the relationship between the mast string and the gravitationally oriented string intersect at a 15* degree angle. You will have to take my word for it that the angle you see pictured here is in fact at a 15* degree angle. Now in theory where the mast string exits the deck is the center of where the mast will someday be exiting the deck. Now measure the angle from the mast step and you have the angle to cut the base if the mast

    Now that you all understand string theory, let's look at where we have got to so far on the schooner theory

    The theory is that some day this will be a schooner!
    Looking very close you can see the fore and aft string. This is the heatedly debated point where the juncture of string theory and schooner theory overlap.(YOU DO NOT WANT TO GO THERE! You think that what is going on over on the NACA thread is serious business? That is Childs play compared to this overlap debate.) So back to pure schooner theory, the space between the two aft main deck beams and the three forward main deck beams is the location of the theoretical main mast piercing up proudly like a giant colossus through the main deck. It's beautiful man!!...... Well I mean in theory it's beautiful,....... because it's not really there and you know.....so it can only be ......well, you know ah,..theoretically beautiful.....but I can see it..ok...So ah, just aft the Spanish windless is where the theoretical fore mast will be and I'm not going to say anything about how it will look or anything, just I'm sure you will like it, ok, so, ah, until next time aarrggh matey. Capt. Z.

  7. #357
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Finally !!, I truly feel I have grasped the string theory in its entirety.The voluminous text I have read in the past lacked pictures.But you cleared that right up.Onwards and upwards Cap'n.

    happy days

    Later.
    Where have we been ? Where are we going ? Why are we here ?

  8. #358
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Coarse or fine thread nuts?

  9. #359
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Should qualify as an addendum to Chapelle! You have our undivided attention...

  10. #360
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Coarse or fine thread nuts?
    Course for motorboats........fine for sailboats..........of course! Capt. Z.

  11. #361
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Today; the good news is....We put in the rest of the port side shear bolts up to the the fore mast. And cut to fit six deck beams so now the deck beams run up past the foremast.
    The bad news.......I burned out an brand new (five days on the job)professional half inch drill.
    It is quite a sensation to stand in side the hull with the deck beams over head and get a since of the space. I worked till it was dark today so I didn't get a daily progress picture taken. I'll try to remember to take one in the morning. Capt. Z.

  12. #362
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    I, for one, am glad that you provided this intro to String/Schooner theory. That NACA foil thread was giving me headaches!

    Tom

  13. #363
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Pictures, Pictures, red hot pictures, new evidence supporting schooner theory! get your pictures here!

    I climbed up on the back to get a view looking forward.

    This view is from inside the V berth.
    so then I climbed up above the V berth and took this picture.

    Cleaned up all the nuts and washers on the shelf clamp and put a coat of varnish on them. The part inside the wood and in the outside counter sink hole are treated with a metal protection paint. Also got five beams faired to the shelf, so tomorrow we will continue bed the rest and then sand and varnish these faired bedded beams then drill and bolt them in to place. Enjoy. Capt. Z.

  14. #364
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    I'm going to steal the line from an old joke...beautiful just f'''kin' beautiful. You Capt'n are an amazing, if not fast guy. Thanks for this thread.

  15. #365
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    You sir are FAST. It looks as if you'll soundly beat me to the water. My whole boat displaces some small fraction of your ballast alone, and yet I can't seem to pull ahead! I love watching this build. Keep up the good work.

  16. #366
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Does anyone remember the lyrics;
    Some days are diamonds
    Some days are stones
    Sometimes the hard times
    Won't leave me alone.
    Well today was a stone. I started to work bedding the next beam from where I left off yesterday when my helper started to sand the first beam of the day, he plugged in my porter-cable random orbital sander and turned it on and it went supernova in his hand. It has been my sanding work horse for years. And now it's gone. And then my screen on the new camera started to have dead spots on it. I spent the rest of the day going from store to store only to find no one stocks random orbital sanders in this town. So went to the next town and returned the camera for a new one(that took the store 2 hours to exchange it!!! And I got nothing done. So much for being fast, thanks for the kind words tigerregis and J. Madison. And J. you cannot pull ahead from germany and brazil. Also I noticed your building in Oregon City I have family there and my daughter will be stopping in to visit them next month, that makes us almost like neibors or something. Anyway I too have been following your build and I am looking forward to seeing yours planked. Capt. Z.
    Last edited by Capt Zatarra; 04-20-2012 at 08:18 PM.

  17. #367
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Bummer to hear about the sander, it looks like you're making fine progress though. Better luck tomorrow.

    Jim
    Eternal optimist and a slow learner.
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow
    SOF Ruth Wherry
    and a new SOF Whitehall too.

  18. #368
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Thanks Jim, Tomorrow I hope to be the proud owner of a new RO sander. And new tools always make me feel better. Capt. Z.
    Last edited by Capt Zatarra; 04-20-2012 at 08:56 PM.

  19. #369
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    And J. you cannot pull ahead from germany and brazil. Also I noticed your building in Oregon City I have family there and my daughter will be stopping in to visit them next month, that makes us almost like neibors or something. Anyway I too have been following your build and I am looking forward to seeing yours planked. Capt. Z.
    Oregon city! We knew it was a small world. Well if she gets tired of visiting relatives and wants to hang out in a boat shop send her my way. Any relative of the Good Captn is welcome around here. (Well maybe not your worst relatives, assuming they're anything like mine.)

  20. #370
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    As far as burning out the drill goes, it might be a good idea to check your line voltage when you have a good-sized tool running at full power. If you're under 100 volts that might cause trouble. It's easy to check. One guy drills, other guy used voltmeter in the outlet closest to the tool.
    Low voltage is hard on tools, and particularly on variable speed reversing tools. The switches get hot and burn out, I think. So if you can find an old-fashioned drill, one speed, one direction, that might last longer. If the label on the tool says that it will work with AC or DC, that's the tool you're looking for.

  21. #371
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    J.M. I'll tell her. My little brother is getting married there next month. So I recon that there will be a whole passel o' kin folk of mine runnin' round there. So I figure maybe fer visitin' your shop, just my closest kin, hand selected, cream o' the crop type kin folk, allowed over. Besides my daughter that leaves exactly ah oh ah..... Let's just say their a wild and crazy bunch, when you see a wedding with every one in kilts and pagpipes playin' that will be my clan!

    Meanwhile back here in Nicaragua I took a picture of a traffic jam while I was out looking for power tools.
    Don't you just hate it when some guy is in such a hurry that he keeps pulling his horse farther and farther into the intersection. As if it will make the truck move faster.

    The best part of this picture is the cowboy with the Woody and Buzz Lightyear backpack.

    While on the other side of town more evidence to support the schooner theory is discovered.
    This is the first two main deck beams bolted in.

    The bolts will be trimmed back. So do you guys want some input in the build here. I keep going back and forth on how to finish the two lower corners of the beam.
    1.-Sand the corner softly rounded over.
    2.-Router the corner with an ogee bit or a bead bit.
    Let me know what you think-remember, like any presidential election-vote early, vote often.
    Capt. Z

  22. #372
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    I like the ogee bit on the sheer clamp and that would look good on the beam edges too. But a nice round over will be easier to deal with come refinishing time.

    Jim
    Eternal optimist and a slow learner.
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow
    SOF Ruth Wherry
    and a new SOF Whitehall too.

  23. #373
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    I like rounded.

  24. #374
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Personal preference is the routed edge, I went through the same process as you trying to decide how to clean up the edges on my H28 sheer clamp and deck beams Z, the routed edge ended up easier and better looking for me in terms of removing splintered edges and hiding chips out of the edges. Although mine isn't as perfect as I'd like it, having done it around all of the existing framing, it looks like a little more effort as gone into the finish than just a round sanded edge.
    Larks

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    And those that mind.... don't matter."

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  25. #375
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    How about hand planes, to give the edges that look of unique craftsmanship?

    Tom

  26. #376
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Scientist View Post
    How about hand planes, to give the edges that look of unique craftsmanship?

    Tom
    I really like that idea I will play around with a cut off piece and see how it looks. Capt Z.

  27. #377
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    I just realized that I have been posting on this thread for one year now! Happy anniversary every one, I hope I get a lot more done in the next year then I did in the last year. The wood delivery delay just really set the nonexistent time schedule back. But we press on.
    I got another deck beam bolted in this morning. It seems strange that something so simple can take so long to do. It goes like this
    Step. 1. Place beam on shelf (today the beam was only 8.5 feet wide so much easier then the 13.5 feet wide ones I was doing yesterday)
    Step. 2. Measure from the bow to both port and starboard ends of the beam to ascertain that the beam is square to the ship. Next measure both port and starboard ends from previous beam to insure the new beam is parallel to the neighbor beam.
    Step. 3. Clamp beam in place.
    Step. 4. Drill 3/8" hole from the bottom of the shelf clamp up through the beam.
    Step. 5. Change drill bit to 1" spade bit and drill countersink hole on top of beam.
    Step. 6. Measure depth of hole and measure and cut 3/8 threaded rod (painted with rustproofing).
    Step. 7. Planish rod over nut and then insert washer in hole then rod and nut, thread unpainted washer and nut on rod below shelf clamp and tighten.
    Step. 8. Trim excess rod and then varnish lower washer and nut, and a second coat of rustproof on top washer and nut.
    Prior to all this each beam was cut to fit and then notched to fit flush on the shelf then removed from the boat. Set up on sawhorses sanded and varnished then when dry carried back up the ladder to the deck where the above steps are taken.
    I was hoping to get the deck on before the rainy season, but that is looking rather unlikely. So I think that I will have to sew up a boat cover from some awning material. To keep every thing dry. It has been a very wet dry season, and some of the old-timers say that means we are in for a very dry rainy season. That would be hard on the farmers here, but really good for me. So happy Anniversary everyone and have a gulper on me. I believe I shall have my usual ginseng lime coca-cola. It goes like this fill a tall glass with ice squeeze one large lime over ice, add 20 drops of concentrated red panax ginseng extracted and then pour the glass full with coca-cola. Take a hardy swig and enjoy. Cheers me hardies, here's to wooden boats. Capt. Z.

  28. #378
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Happy anniversary Z and all the very best wishes for the coming year. Do you have any non existant finish line in that non existant schedule? End of the dry wet season ready for the start of the next wet dry season perhaps? Or the season after that?
    Larks

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    Because those that matter...don't mind...
    And those that mind.... don't matter."

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  29. #379
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    If there was (and there certainly is not) a nonexistent schedule it would not have any references to having the deck laid and the hull planked by the next mini dry season (august)!!fact is this post probably doesn't exist either. Besides it is just a schooner theory, which means that it's existence is still in doubt in which case I don't exist either?? I think!? capt zzz....

  30. #380

    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    I'll raise a glass with ya Z in honour of a year on the job.

    I'm getting excited seeing those deck beams go on; it's like you're giving your boat it's bones back.

    You are part of a long proud tradition, rebuilding yer boat on that beach. 'xcept these days we can all watch you sweat from our world wide web of comfy chairs. Thanks for takin time to share, more power to ya

    regards from Groover

  31. #381
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Capt Z

    I really admire this project.
    The honest approach and progress you are making is very inspiring for a lot of us!

    Thanks, and keep up the good work!

    Cheers,
    Ole

  32. #382
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    ^ +1 to what Ole said. Happy anniversary.

    Jim
    Eternal optimist and a slow learner.
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow
    SOF Ruth Wherry
    and a new SOF Whitehall too.

  33. #383
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Excellent stuff el capitan! Takes me back to days of working on "larger vessels", oh the pain...
    Xanthorrea

  34. #384
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Belated congrats, Captain!

    ...I was off the Net for a few days and mjust caught up last night. Yes, I hoisted a glass in your honour, and here's to another (whatever time it takes) to complete your rebuild!

    Tom

  35. #385
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    "Step. 2. Measure from the bow to both port and starboard ends of the beam to ascertain that the beam is square to the ship. Next measure both port and starboard ends from previous beam to insure the new beam is parallel to the neighbor beam."

    Probably too late to help you on this z, but to cut down on all that individual measuring you need to trust your layout. Get a middle beam in and then layout each side from there, both forward and aft. If your beams are 13" O/C, hook a tape on a beam and run 13 and away (don't mark beam centers), 26, 39, etc. keep your tape close to square to the beam and you'll be close enough. Measuring beam to beam can get you in trouble as a 1/16" discrepancy can have your beam placement off by over an inch in ten feet, even though measuring from the bow to each side remains equal. You might not want that forward skylight to end up over a bulkhead.
    Lookin' good, congrats on the anniversary. / Jim

  36. #386
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Jim. Thanks for the help. It is always appreciated. I am familiar with the 1/16" creep. I face an additional challenge with this build, in that since all the fliches were hand hewn in the forest, (chainsaw mostly) and then dragged out to the road, they are not perfect in their dementions. And becuase I am attempting to be true to the idea that this build would be recognized by a builder from the late 18th, early 19th century, I chose to not run them through a planer to make them all exactly the same thickness, but to hand saw the beams from the fliches and then hand plane them to remove the saw marks, and then sand them leaving the slight variations in thickness. I must confess to using an electric sander at this point. (I am not completely crazy). Doing it this way, the beams are all the same height but not the same width, most are within 1/4 inch thickness, but some are as much as an inch wider then all the others, the widest ones I put on either side of the masts. And some are not the exact same from one end to the other of an individual beam. All of this makes it a little tricky to lay up the beams in just the right place before bolting. In this case I opted to keep the space between the beams the same instead of the distance between centers, if ihad kept the dbc the same the negative space between beams would have varied. As for the skylights and bulkheads and such that is where string theory comes in on my center string that I talked about a few post back, I hung strings down to mark where the beams had to go to frame mast and hatches. This way I was able to pretetermine the exact placement of the beams ahead of time as well. I hope that makes sence. Capt. Z

  37. #387
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    "I hung strings down to mark where the beams had to go to frame mast and hatches. This way I was able to pretetermine the exact placement of the beams ahead of time as well. I hope that makes sence. Capt. Z "

    It does now, Z. I had been reading along but perhaps was distracted by the beautiful pictures. Tks for the clarification; I'll try to pay more attention in the future. / Jim

  38. #388
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Beaming right along, I have reached the point where there is still a little bit of the old boat left. These are the last four original beams and the breasthook, and the bowsprit. Looking around I noticed the sawsall, you can see it lurking down in the corner of the picture, and the four pound short tail sledgehammer sniffing about. Like all predators they are looking for a weakness.

    Here is the side view, it is so tranquil.

    And then in just a few quick strokes the sawsall has removed the sick and weak wood from the strong and the sledge has driven it off.

    And the side view again, after the carnage. All that's left is some rusty nails and bolts. But they won't last long, whenever there are predators like the mighty sawsall and the short tail sledge around, there will always be a CROWbar or two, waiting to rush in and grab a rusty nail or two.

    That was quick! Now if anyone is out there watching this and your thinking that looks like fun I think I'll just go and build a new boat right where that old boat is parked in the boat yard. After all I own a sawsall and a shorty four pounder. A word of advise "UNbuilding an old boat in order to build a new boat is hard work and your docile seeming sawsall sitting so quietly in it's carry case has a voracious appetite and if it is not kept on a short extension cord it will cut and part until there is nothing left of the old boat to be found. Take my word for it sawsalls are not domestic tools, they are wild and dangerous tools and must be handled by some one who can control them. I've got mine back in it's case now. And my arms are really tired right now and feel like spaghetti noodles. I think I am going to go lay down. Capt. Z.

  39. #389
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    That was quick! Now if anyone is out there watching this and your thinking that looks like fun I think I'll just go and build a new boat right where that old boat is parked in the boat yard. After all I own a sawsall and a shorty four pounder. A word of advise "UNbuilding an old boat in order to build a new boat is hard work
    Nice work capt... I found that part funny... Remember my first post #16 about a year ago
    http://www.peacefuljourney.ca/
    BEWARE: I am a native french speaker

  40. #390
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    After wrestling with my sawsall all morning. Some friends came by and invited me to go sailing in the afternoon. Alright!!! We loaded up with food and beverages and sailed for about three hours down the coast. To a place called Playa Blonca. Once we got there we strung up a hammock between the forestay and the mast and well I'll let the picture of my feet tell you how it was.

    Over on the shore to my left, white flowers were blooming

    And on my right the rocks look like an Indian

    After much food and beverage was consumed we sailed back to San Juan del Sur. This rock at the mouth of the bay is actually called Indian Head Rock.

    I took this right after the sun set so it is a little fuzzy. What a great day. Capt. Z.

  41. #391
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by JoshuaIII View Post
    Nice work capt... I found that part funny... Remember my first post #16 about a year ago
    Oboy do I ever! If only I could see into the future! Capt. Z

  42. #392
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Zatarra View Post
    your docile seeming sawsall sitting so quietly in it's carry case has a voracious appetite and if it is not kept on a short extension cord it will cut and part until there is nothing left of the old boat to be found. Take my word for it sawsalls are not domestic tools, they are wild and dangerous tools and must be handled by some one who can control them. I've got mine back in it's case now. Capt. Z.
    Never a truer word spoken.Ive seen many a fine vessel turned to sawdust before they were brought to their senses !
    Where have we been ? Where are we going ? Why are we here ?

  43. #393
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Today I finished bolting in the last of the shear shelf, shear clamp, and shear strake. Big sigh! Then started on the breasthook.
    I decided it would be easier to install the last full length deck beams starting from the breasthook and working aft to the fore mast. After all the whole deck beams are in it's on to the carlins and short beams. Capt. Z.

  44. #394

    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Great restoration thread! I just checked out the whole thing. Congratulations on the progress you are making. I feel like a real doof sitting at my desk on the computer typing this reply. You are pushing me further towards selling everything and going 3rd world. Keep it up I will be following along with admiration and jealousy! And oh yah, MORE PICS!
    Ron

  45. #395
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Quote Originally Posted by Me Tarzan View Post
    Great restoration thread! I just checked out the whole thing. Congratulations on the progress you are making. I feel like a real doof sitting at my desk on the computer typing this reply. You are pushing me further towards selling everything and going 3rd world. Keep it up I will be following along with admiration and jealousy! And oh yah, MORE PICS!
    Ron
    Thanks for taking the time to comment. It keeps me motivated to take pictures and post my progress. Capt. Z.

  46. #396
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    So it's Saterday and and I'm sitting here in a quandary, it has to do with the forward hatch and the anchor chain and locker. One of the changes that I am making to the schooner is to add a second anchor and anchor chain to the bow. Before the anchor chain was stowed in the chain locker in front of the v- berth, 300 feet of it. When I relaunch it will be two lengths of 400 feet of chain. And 2 anchors one port and one starboard. That increases the weight of the anchor chain from 510 pounds in the anchor locker to 1360 pounds. A 850 pounds difference. So I moved the anchor locker back from in front of the v-berth to both sides of the foremast moving that weight aft a little over eight feet. The problem is getting both chains to pass on both sides of the v berth hatch. Since the hatch must be wide enough to fit a grown man through it needs to be about 30 inches plus about 8 inches of framing and lid over hang, so approx. 38". That would mean the windless would have to be about 50 inches wide. I should add here for clarity that the windless is the old fashioned wooden barrel type. Like this one on the Adveturess, only smaller and a little more modern with the bronze rachets for the pawls on either side(circa late 1700's).

    (I stole this from MariaSimpson's Rockport Marine web page. http://rockportmarine.blogspot.com/2...adventure.html Thanks guys.)

    I feel that if the chain was close to the hatch it would chew it up over time. And if I made the windless wide enough for the chain to pass on either side of the hatch, the windless would look ridiculously wide. If I put the windless next to the Samson post I would have to have a chain pipe running at a 45 degree angle through the v-berth, which is even more ludicrous, as it would make the v-berth virtually unusable. The other option that I have thought of is to put the hatch to the side, by the gunnel. Something like this.
    Thanks to A&R way boatbuilding for the picture, I pinched this one too!
    And if I did that can I get away with doing it on only one side? Or do I put one on both side for semetry, even though there is only eight feet athort ship at this point.?
    This is one of those problems I had put off the final desision till later, figuring that I would come up with the right solution as I worked on the schooner, so now I am at the point where I need to frame in the foredeck to acomadate the hatches and hardware, and I am still not sure which way to go! Any thoughts from anyone. Capt. Z.

  47. #397
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Z, I'm picturing that you want the chain to run back from the rollers to the hawse pipes in a straight line, but could you curve the chain around the deck using a couple of extra vertically mounted rollers or a bit of curved stainless or bronze pipe, ie curved like an elbow, either side? So that they angle slightly outboard from the anchor rollers wide enough to clear the hatch by a good margin before turning slightly to run straight back to the hawse pipes.
    Larks

    "Be who you are and say what you feel...
    Because those that matter...don't mind...
    And those that mind.... don't matter."

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    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  48. #398
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Good for the chain to stow aft, but the windlass does not have to be there. Remember the angle of the chain from the cat to the windlass is crucial.
    Maybe run the chain under the deck, not on top of it, in an angled pipe to where it wants to go.
    The weight of 10 or 15 feet of chain pulling BACK will make it more civilized.
    Buncha chain rattling around on deck be freakin dangerous.

  49. #399
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    Don't get too paranoid on weight at the bow. There is a constant crew in the cockpit + a heavy diesel + diesel tank aft of the boat... The boat will already sit down aft if you do not put some weight forward... That diesel engine of yours sure weight the 800 pounds that you talk about

    I always find it funny to see people sailing with 3 peoples sitting in the cockpit with the bow pointing toward the sky...
    http://www.peacefuljourney.ca/
    BEWARE: I am a native french speaker

  50. #400
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    Default Re: Rebuilding my 50' schooner in Nicaragua

    As promised here is a photo of my progress

    And this is a splice in the shear strake

    So about the anchor chain/hatch problem,
    Larks, I would like the chain to run in a straight line. For two reasons, first, becuase of the wear on the deck by the chain I have seen where other builders have used a harder denser wood that had a slight channel for the chain to run in that was laid up as part of the deck planking. And second every roller or angle in the chain seems to add so much more resistance to hauling in the chain and it is a lot of work already.

    Wiz, I'm not sure what you mean about the angle of the chain from the cat to the windless. The 'cathead' is used to haul the anchor up for storage after the anchor has cleared the surface. Once the anchor is secured the chain is unfastened and feed the rest of the way through the hawse hole in the bulwark to the hawse pipe where it is out of sight till it is time to anchor again.so it is only on deck when at anchor. So can you elaberate a little more cause you lost me.
    I had thought about running the chain under the deck, but that is what I was talking about with the two pipes angling from the above deck over the v berth bunk forward and then angling down to the mast base all the way across the v berth bunk. Like this

    Excuse the simple sketch, this shows how the pipes would run over the v berth bunk making it almost useless. So this is the idea with the windless before the mast

    Stephane, the big ol' diesel engine is long gone, all 1,260 pounds. And the schooner is a center cockpit, even so a 23 gross ton schooner doesn't really move much with with a few people moving around. This is actually a better drawing of the chain locker relocation. The green pencil points to the old chain locker, as you can see the locker was above the waterline. The pink pencil points to the new chain locker which is about 4 feet below the water line, as well as eight feet farther back from the bow

    Here is a drawing from 'The Baltimore Clipper' by Chapelle. It shows the windless over the hatch, and

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