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Thread: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

  1. #1
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    Default Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    A sturdy ocean racer once well known on the Chesapeake Bay.

    The Alden schooner 'Tradition,' design number 357, as seen in the book 'John G. Alden and His Yacht Designs.'

    Built in 1928 by Hodgdon Brothers in East Boothbay, Maine.

    John G. himself sailed aboard in the 1928 Bermuda Race.

    1,702 square feet of sail.

    LOD: 59' 11" LWL: 45' 9" Beam: 14' 4" Draft: 8' 1"

    Vessel is floating and moves under her own diesel power.

    Vessel requires full restoration.

    Sale to a proper steward only.

    Good home more important than price.

    Owner says: Don't be shy - Bring all offers!

    (206) 601-3867
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    Owner says: Don't be shy - Bring all offers!
    westsail for trade?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    If you got this schooner Paul you would surely need a nice 3" bandsaw
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    if i got that schooner i would need a divorce lawyer
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    Yeah, but We could be PIRATES!!!!! PIE RATS!!!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    Quote Originally Posted by paul pless View Post
    if i got that schooner i would need a divorce lawyer
    "Homme libre, toujours tu cheriras la mer" (Charles Baudelaire)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    Default Re: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    Hello all,

    Curious if anyone has the history of this vessel between this post and now?

    She’s for sale again. $200K the yacht brokers aren’t exactly jumping at the opportunity to get me information.

    I am poking around looking at different boats for sale with the idea of starting a charter company similar to the Maple Leaf out of Victoria. On that note my current schooner Blue Starr 1 is kind of for sale.

    Attachment 8243IMG_3601.jpg
    Last edited by r2dchew; 01-06-2018 at 05:47 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Project Boat: 1928 John G. Alden Schooner 76' - $99500 (Seattle)

    I believe this is the Alden Tradition we handled at the brokerage back in the mid-'70's. A beautiful boat. Everything you'd expect of your basic Alden schooner. Sadly, even then, she was "rode hard and put away wet." She was in need of a major structural refit, but a prior owner had instead attempted to build a fiberglass hull around her. Supposedly, the repair approach was cooked up by Alan Vaites, but we have to excuse him for that. It was common in those times to try to get a few more years out of great wooden yachts by laying up fiberglass or cement around them. This job had a gazillion stainless (IIRC) screws driven part way into the hull below the waterline. They held fiber glass fabric in place and stuck up like little pegs. The resin layup was done on top of that. At the time, it was "working," by who knew for how long?

    I heard she was eventually given a major overhaul and later taken down to the northwestern coast of South American where she sank inshore, was raised, and repaired locally. She's been around if she's back in the PNW now.

    She was a good sailing boat and what you'd expect from a large Alden schooner. Pictured below with black topsides as went we sold her.



    On the other hand, for an additional $250,000, you would probably do much, much better to buy Dauntless, another Alden schooner, two years younger, a foot or two longer, in far better condition, and far, far better maintained. I've never sailed aboard Dauntless but raced with her and she's a great sailing boat. I've been below as a guest several times, this being in the late '70's or early '80's, after she had been impeccably restored. She was, and I hope still is, breathtaking. As the picture below indicates, however, these are not the sort of boats you and the missus take for a Saturday afternoon sail on a whim. You need trained, experienced crew who will show up dependably when you want to take her out. These are very powerful vessels and they can get away from you easily in a blow, with life-threatening results.



    Current listing and more photos: http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1930...s#.WlFJOGdy7fY

    When you do your dreaming about these grand old girls, keep in mind that they are quite long in the tooth at this late date and that they were built with the intention of their lasting somewhere between twenty and thirty years, at best, so, unless they've enjoyed a total rebuild along the way, they will almost certainly be maintenance nightmares until totally rebuilt to today's highest standards. We wooden boaters think in terms of the finest exotic hardwoods and "forever" silicon bronze fastenings, but back in their day, many of these boats were built of Doug fir or pine with iron boat nails for fastenings. Think "major frame and planking replacement." Very few people have the money to own one of these things anymore and those with the money probably have the sense not to buy one! ]

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