Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    367

    Default Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    This showed up on Craigslist yesterday. I have no financial interest in the boat.

    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/sfc/boa/2329362549.html
    Norm Harris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    1,793

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    Look at the heel angle it's sailing at compared to the other boats in the picture. Beautiful boat though.
    Roger Long

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    22,315

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    Is San Francisco Bay shallow enough to make a centerboard boat necessary?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    St. Simon\'s Island, GA, USA
    Posts
    5,082

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    That Sharpie looks like a copy of the "Minocqua", 38 ft LOA, and called a "Roslyn yawl Nonparil sharpie, and designed by Clapham. It is described in the Sharpie Book by Reuel Parker and I believe you can by the plans from Parker Marine Enterprises. The original was intended for Long Island Sound.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Jupiter
    Posts
    274

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    There are indeed many shallow areas in the bay and delta that shallow draft would be an asset. I'll second the Minocqua design. Sure is a pretty boat. The boat in the left of that photo looks reefed and Sarah does seem to be reaching higher than the other boats in the photo. David
    Last edited by Boatsmith; 04-17-2011 at 06:46 PM.
    Boatsmith Inc
    We Build Your Dreams
    (561) 744-0855
    www.boatsmithfl.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Kittery Point, ME
    Posts
    507

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    What a salty little hooker! I like the Tiny Tot. I do think the mizzen is way too big, and the two headsails would better be replaced by one reffable one. She looks mighty tender, but most sharpies are. Hope she goes to a good home.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,457

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    As I recall SF can be gusty. She might have a gust the other boats arn't getting yet. My meadowlark stands up pretty well.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Upwest, Maine
    Posts
    66

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    One of the very few Roslyn Yawls around. Has some dead rise instead of traditional sharpie flat bottom. It's been for sale for a while.
    http://www.sfbackyard.com/boat/

    The Clapham/Parker Minocqua had a gunter instead of gaff main.

    From an earlier for sale notice (when the price was $184,000):
    The Sarah is an all-wood 38' gaff-rigged yawl designed in 1880 by Thomas Clapham of Long Island, New York. The design was adapted and built from the keel up by Bill Garvie of San Rafael. Garvie took the original drawings and specifications and duplicated them to the finest detail. From bow to stern, the boat measures 38 feet, the main mast stands more than 30 feet and it weighs somewhere in the area of 13,000 pounds. A variety of woods were used in the construction of the Sarah, including white oak, Alaskan yellow cedar and teak in the cockpit.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    82,369

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    Boy she's pretty. There's another interesting gaffer in the background in this photo, not to mention the square rigged ship beyond her mizzen and a rather pretty bridge way off. . .

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    11,349

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    I know Sarah well. She was built singlehandedly by my late and good friend Bill Garvie, master boatbuilder, who taught me most of what I know about wooden boats. I watched him build four over the years. Bill ran "W.C.Garvie - Boatbuilder," his yard in San Rafael, CA. I watched Billl build Sarah from start to finish, stopping by to chat and learn once or twice a week and even lent a hand on occasion pouring lead, hanging plank and such. Bill, who apprenticed at Mare Island Naval Shipyard "back in the day," build Sarah after he retired, working eight hours a day, five days a week, just as if it were a paying job, for maybe seven or eight years. He was a wonderful, wonderful guy.

    Sarah is indeed built of the finest materials. While she was "designed" by Clapham in 1880, all Bill had to go on was a study drawing out of a book. He'd kept the picture of this boat for decades, always dreaming ti would be the last boat he built and, sadly it was. I believe he was 90 years old when he passed away a couple or three years ago, only three or four years after launching her. He really designed her himself, since he had to do all the engineering work, develop the scantlings and calculate weight and so on. Everything on this boat is "finestkind." Bill was always like that. Whatever went into Sarah was the best material or product available and generally very traditional. A lot of her fittings and such Bill had been laying away for decades, saving them for this one last project. (The red and white lead in her came from George Kirby, of course! Her sails are handworked, IIRC, by Nat Wilson in Maine.) She is, by all reports, a very fast sailing boat with very good windward ability. Her shoal draft makes her perfect for gunkholing in the SF Bay and Delta.

    Being as she is essentially a brand new boat, now only maybe five years old, the price is quite a bargain, all things considered. To have a boat built, fully found, to Sarah's level of quality by a similarly skilled and experienced builder would easily get you into the six figure range. Bill's skills were most remarkable. The joinerwork on her is like fine furniture. It's certainly a great deal for somebody. I sure hope she gets the owner she deserves.

    Here's more on Bill and Sarah: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre.....-passed-away.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,212

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    Thanks, I've always admired the type.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    367

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    I hope that whoever buys her brings her into Master Mariners. Sarah would be a great addition to the fleet.
    Norm Harris

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    22,315

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    Of course, a boat designed in the 1880s might be over canvassed by modern standards, because she had to get home without an engine. This might explain the heeling.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    downward bound
    Posts
    2,501

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    No affiliation Sarah is now available for charter:
    http://ccsail.com/
    currently at the fuel dock in Santa Cruz Harbor and looking nice.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    2,660

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    and some more pics still on the web here: http://www.davidjonesclassics.com/sa...ie-2005-35000/

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: Sharpie on San Francisco Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by Lincoln C View Post
    One of the very few Roslyn Yawls around. Has some dead rise instead of traditional sharpie flat bottom. It's been for sale for a while.
    http://www.sfbackyard.com/boat/

    The Clapham/Parker Minocqua had a gunter instead of gaff main.

    From an earlier for sale notice (when the price was $184,000):
    The Sarah is an all-wood 38' gaff-rigged yawl designed in 1880 by Thomas Clapham of Long Island, New York. The design was adapted and built from the keel up by Bill Garvie of San Rafael. Garvie took the original drawings and specifications and duplicated them to the finest detail. From bow to stern, the boat measures 38 feet, the main mast stands more than 30 feet and it weighs somewhere in the area of 13,000 pounds. A variety of woods were used in the construction of the Sarah, including white oak, Alaskan yellow cedar and teak in the cockpit.
    Interesting to see that SARAH is for sale again, but this time for only $32K. Why?
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •