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Thread: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

  1. #71
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    I rekon that I an most other practical minded boat users and repairers who have a long experience of a certain type of boat and a basic understanding of engineering could tweak the hull shape of that particular boat type to a certain extent to make it for instance roll a bit less or carry a bit more load or track a little better or ride a bit dryer. Or we can figure out where to increase the scantlings to strenghten certain weak spots observed in an old boat of the same type and size.
    That is how most traditional boat types developed over centuries.

    To me anything beyond that is within the realm of proper naval achitects. Off limits to me.
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

  2. #72
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    Quote Originally Posted by George Ferguson View Post
    Andrew2 and Peerie Maa, that is exactly what I did. I was curious about the individual who stated something to the effect of marine design not being "rocket science" "for most of us". This thread was probably the third thing that popped up. I read through some of the posts. It looks like other folks on here feel the same way I do about some of the comments by the "professionals" that have been posted on here, and some stated they no longer participate in the forum because of the negative comments by others. That's unfortunate.

    A lot of us could consider ourselves "professionals" in certain aspects. That's kind of natural in a economic society of specialized labor. Most of the real professionals I've met in my lifetime are the ones who are always striving to learn, including from participation in discussions by those who are new to the subject. I had an incident that occurred one day when I was younger where I was definitely out of line in a meeting that involved people with all levels of experience in the discussion we were having. I'd made comments that were condescending to another person who didn't have the formal "qualifications" I had. After that meeting, my boss, who was also a great mentor, filled me in on how such an attitude was a hindrance to the collaborative efforts of the group, and how it was a hindrance to my own personal growth in the field and others. He was someone I've held in high regard. Not because he was my boss, but because he'd earned my respect in a significant way, by example. I've never forgotten that discussion between he and I. My life has been better for it and I think I've had more of a positive impact on the world around me than I would have had if he not let me see things from that perspective. I will admit that I fail greatly sometimes in holding up to my standards of belief on the matter. I let Jim's comment get under my skin a little when I shouldn't have. But I also strongly feel that people should be able to include their input in conversations, whether it is right or wrong, or how "professional" they may be in the field.
    George makes excellent comments above. A degree and a job do not necessarily make a person a professional. I've had the personal experience of working with many excellent professionals in many knowledge areas and I've also worked with individuals that thought very highly of themselves, that actually were something that needed to be scrapped off your shoe. The fact is the world's full of failures created by engineers including some of the most spectacular tragedies.
    Last edited by navydog; 04-15-2019 at 01:36 PM.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    The fact is the world's full of failures created by engineers including some of the most spectacular tragedies. - navydog

    ...while the failures (and occasionally deaths) of amateurs with little experience but lots of hubris go mostly unchronicled. <wink, grin>
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    Without entering the debate that triggered this discussion, and without taking anything away from the many amateurs who provide the benefit of their experience and expertise here, I'd like to offer my sincere appreciation and thanks to all the professionals who donate their time and good will on the WBF. It is a wonderful thing to me that someone would offer the benefit of their knowledge, experience and education for free to any and all who ask for it - even though they may receive more abuse than thanks at times. I would not be so patient. But here we have professional designers and naval architects, professional sailmakers, professional boat builders and shipwrights - all people who worked for years to learn what they know - who are willing to contribute their time to help those of us who have more enthusiasm than expertise. We owe them at least the courtesy of respecting their knowledge.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    Thank-you, Chris. Very kind words.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Thank-you, Chris. Very kind words.
    He did say it well, didn't he?

    I couldn't agree with him more.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #77
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    The fact is the world's full of failures created by engineers including some of the most spectacular tragedies. - navydog

    ...while the failures (and occasionally deaths) of amateurs with little experience but lots of hubris go mostly unchronicled. <wink, grin>
    Oh no, there is a special recognition for amateurs. Darwin Awards.
    Last edited by navydog; 04-15-2019 at 01:17 PM.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Without entering the debate that triggered this discussion, and without taking anything away from the many amateurs who provide the benefit of their experience and expertise here, I'd like to offer my sincere appreciation and thanks to all the professionals who donate their time and good will on the WBF. It is a wonderful thing to me that someone would offer the benefit of their knowledge, experience and education for free to any and all who ask for it - even though they may receive more abuse than thanks at times. I would not be so patient. But here we have professional designers and naval architects, professional sailmakers, professional boat builders and shipwrights - all people who worked for years to learn what they know - who are willing to contribute their time to help those of us who have more enthusiasm than expertise. We owe them at least the courtesy of respecting their knowledge.
    Yes, indeed.
    -Dave

  9. #79
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    Nov 2018
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    New Orleans, LA, USA
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    55

    Default Re: A naval architect's concerns about online forums

    Fun fact: according to a friend, "it's not rocket science" was originally a jibe levelled by nuclear physicists towards rocket designers, meaning that nuclear physics was difficult, not "easy" like rocket science.

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