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Thread: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

  1. #1
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    Default death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Just hear me out:

    So I went to my local yard recently, the biggest one in my area. They have alot of wood, at pretty high prices, but at least (I thought) they have a good selection. I was looking for clear fir lumber. They had nothing bigger than a 2x2 available. I went to look at a pile of wood to see if any decent pieces were in there, and the employee who escorted me into the yard hassled me on, I was being too "picky". I only looked at the top pieces, taking probably 30 seconds, but that was enough to annoy him. This is the same story every time I go there, whether to buy plywood or anything else. If I ask too many questions (questions like, "do you carry clear wrc?") I get eye rolling. There is only one guy who works there who is nice enough to actually give some customer service. (PS I am no pain in the butt customer either, I try really hard to be courteous and not waste anyone's time. Plus I have bought alot of wood from them, and consider myself a regular customer)

    I called up several local lumberyards today. All I wanted was clear pine 2 by's (to make a set of oars). Nobody had them. Nobody. I have called for clear fir in the past. Nobody has it. They won't order it either, and alot of people told me they had clear pine/fir planks but when I showed up it was just grade 2 construction lumber, knotty as hell.

    How can major lumberyards in the new york city area not carry clear pine planks?!?!? In fact, they don't carry any clear planks of any softwood at all in greater than 3/4 inch thickness. And worst of all, how can they have such terrible customer service skills? Yet these are the guys who b*#@% when a big box store opens up nearby and "unfairly" steals their local business.

    So I will have to do what I did for my last set of oars, goto the local mega store and buy the clearest 2x4's I can find. I can spend all day there, picking out what I want. I will rip off the clearest 1.5"x1.5" strips for the looms, then I will have to nail/glue on strips for the blades. And as un-knowledgeable as the service is at home depot, I never get any eye rolling, despite not being a regular customer.

    My point is, I have always been in the "don't open up big box stores in my neighborhood" camp, but between the high prices, limited choices and poor customer service that I get universally at all of the local lumberyards I have visited or called, I give up. I just give up. Sorry small business owner, but you did it to yourself.
    “The difference between an adventurer and anybody else is that the youthful embrace of discovery, of self or of the world, is not muted by the responsibilities or the safety-catches of maturity.” Jonathan Borgais

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?


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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    So has that lumberyard died, or just lost you as a customer?
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    You usually have to go to a specialty lumberyard for boatbuilding wood in proper thickness. I check Ashby Lumber first, then usually have to go across the street to MacBeath Hardwoods to get what I need at a much higher price.

    Standard lumberyards supply wood to commercial builders, who only use clear WRC or VGDG for trim in most cases, so they won't have the proper 5/4 or thicker woods you need.

    Be sure to learn how to build them first - no nailing. We've had a number of good threads here on what dimensional lumber to use for oars, either for using smaller dimensional wood and gluing blades on, or cutting them out of one piece.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...highlight=oars

    Did you check on 2x8's or wider? I built my spruce oars from a 2x9 plank and just traced the shapes of the looms and blades -- but it was purchased from MacBeath, not a standard lumberyard serving standard commercial home builders.





    Last edited by Thorne; 03-10-2011 at 02:26 PM.
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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    The big box stores have even less in the way of lumber. Even back in the '50s very few general purpose lumber yards even began to understand boatbuilders. Always after the odd size and always so damn pickey. Professional builders secure lumber sourses that can meet their needs. Amateurs have to go through a lot to even approxomate that, often traveling some distances to get good stock or actually making friends with a yard willing to seel some wood. Expecting a lumber yard - remember these guys don't even do their own mill work now adays - to accomodate you demolishing a pile of wood for the piece or two you want, expecting them to be at all happy about the liability issues you cause, is totally unrealistic.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by peterchech View Post
    Just hear me out:

    So I went to my local yard recently, the biggest one in my area. They have alot of wood, at pretty high prices, but at least (I thought) they have a good selection. I was looking for clear fir lumber. They had nothing bigger than a 2x2 available. I went to look at a pile of wood to see if any decent pieces were in there, and the employee who escorted me into the yard hassled me on, I was being too "picky". I only looked at the top pieces, taking probably 30 seconds, but that was enough to annoy him. This is the same story every time I go there, whether to buy plywood or anything else. If I ask too many questions (questions like, "do you carry clear wrc?") I get eye rolling. There is only one guy who works there who is nice enough to actually give some customer service. (PS I am no pain in the butt customer either, I try really hard to be courteous and not waste anyone's time. Plus I have bought alot of wood from them, and consider myself a regular customer)

    I called up several local lumberyards today. All I wanted was clear pine 2 by's (to make a set of oars). Nobody had them. Nobody. I have called for clear fir in the past. Nobody has it. They won't order it either, and alot of people told me they had clear pine/fir planks but when I showed up it was just grade 2 construction lumber, knotty as hell.

    How can major lumberyards in the new york city area not carry clear pine planks?!?!? In fact, they don't carry any clear planks of any softwood at all in greater than 3/4 inch thickness. And worst of all, how can they have such terrible customer service skills? Yet these are the guys who b*#@% when a big box store opens up nearby and "unfairly" steals their local business.

    So I will have to do what I did for my last set of oars, goto the local mega store and buy the clearest 2x4's I can find. I can spend all day there, picking out what I want. I will rip off the clearest 1.5"x1.5" strips for the looms, then I will have to nail/glue on strips for the blades. And as un-knowledgeable as the service is at home depot, I never get any eye rolling, despite not being a regular customer.

    My point is, I have always been in the "don't open up big box stores in my neighborhood" camp, but between the high prices, limited choices and poor customer service that I get universally at all of the local lumberyards I have visited or called, I give up. I just give up. Sorry small business owner, but you did it to yourself.
    Hey, Peter.

    I know that you're on a rant, but I think you need a reality check!

    First, if you'd been after clear hardwood lumber, they could have set you up in fine style in any number of species. However, clear lengths of the various commercially desirable softwoods get ripped up into molding blanks by the millions of lineal feet, and the big molding manufacturers have contracts with the various lumber mills to buy whatever they can produce. At one time I was living in Georgia, and had a job to build 2 dozen tables for a restaurant. They wanted pine. I called all over the state looking for dry, rough-sawn pine, and I couldn't put together 500 BF to save my life! I was able to find enough salvaged lumber to meet my needs, but all the new stock in the state was sold before it ever hit the mill.

    Second, I get the feeling that your idea of 'a lot of lumber' might be different from theirs. If you were dealing with the 'major lumberyards in the New York City area', you should not be surprised to learn that their customers average well over $100K per year. If you are spending less than $10K, it's barely worth their answering the phone. Sorry.

    Further, the 'picking through the pile' (high-grading) thing is a real problem for a high-volume lumberyard. The stack of lumber has been graded by a professional lumber grader, and thus will have a certain number of knots, tight knots and other defects per board foot. The idea behind a 'grade' of lumber is that the buyer can determine how many BF he needs to purchase to yield the number of 'clear cuttings' of a particular length he needs to build his product. If someone comes through and 'cherry-picks' the pile, the average yield of the stack suffers. There's no point in buying FAS lumber when you're making most furniture carcases and frames, because most furniture parts are less than 30" long. #2 lumber is much cheaper by the board foot than FAS, even when you factor in the waste. Another drawback to allowing high-grading is that most yard's insurance policies will not allow a customer on the yard without an employee, and this means that while you're out picking through the pile and agonizing over every board (one of my favorite activities, BTW) then Billy Bob can't be at his desk hashing out an order that will actually make money. Sorry.

    Really, I'm not trying to ruin your rant, because I know that it is heartfelt, but I think you would be well served to better understand just what you're dealing with at a major industrial lumberyard.

    If you are going to insist on pursuing the wooden boat building madness (and more power to you, sir) then I think that your best bet may be to get in touch with your State Forester's office and have them help you figure out where the small, local sawmills are. Then you're in a whole 'nother set of difficulties because every small sawmill owner I've ever met has had the potential to be one cantankerous SOB!

    All the best from Texas, Peter!

    John T

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    Hey, Peter.

    I know that you're on a rant, but I think you need a reality check!

    First, if you'd been after clear hardwood lumber, they could have set you up in fine style in any number of species. However, clear lengths of the various commercially desirable softwoods get ripped up into molding blanks by the millions of lineal feet, and the big molding manufacturers have contracts with the various lumber mills to buy whatever they can produce. At one time I was living in Georgia, and had a job to build 2 dozen tables for a restaurant. They wanted pine. I called all over the state looking for dry, rough-sawn pine, and I couldn't put together 500 BF to save my life! I was able to find enough salvaged lumber to meet my needs, but all the new stock in the state was sold before it ever hit the mill.

    Second, I get the feeling that your idea of 'a lot of lumber' might be different from theirs. If you were dealing with the 'major lumberyards in the New York City area', you should not be surprised to learn that their customers average well over $100K per year. If you are spending less than $10K, it's barely worth their answering the phone. Sorry.

    Further, the 'picking through the pile' (high-grading) thing is a real problem for a high-volume lumberyard. The stack of lumber has been graded by a professional lumber grader, and thus will have a certain number of knots, tight knots and other defects per board foot. The idea behind a 'grade' of lumber is that the buyer can determine how many BF he needs to purchase to yield the number of 'clear cuttings' of a particular length he needs to build his product. If someone comes through and 'cherry-picks' the pile, the average yield of the stack suffers. There's no point in buying FAS lumber when you're making most furniture carcases and frames, because most furniture parts are less than 30" long. #2 lumber is much cheaper by the board foot than FAS, even when you factor in the waste. Another drawback to allowing high-grading is that most yard's insurance policies will not allow a customer on the yard without an employee, and this means that while you're out picking through the pile and agonizing over every board (one of my favorite activities, BTW) then Billy Bob can't be at his desk hashing out an order that will actually make money. Sorry.

    Really, I'm not trying to ruin your rant, because I know that it is heartfelt, but I think you would be well served to better understand just what you're dealing with at a major industrial lumberyard.

    If you are going to insist on pursuing the wooden boat building madness (and more power to you, sir) then I think that your best bet may be to get in touch with your State Forester's office and have them help you figure out where the small, local sawmills are. Then you're in a whole 'nother set of difficulties because every small sawmill owner I've ever met has had the potential to be one cantankerous SOB!

    All the best from Texas, Peter!

    John T

    Very good points john, haha way to ruin a perfectly good rant! :-)

    In my defense though, I never expect to pick through a pile, but sometimes I will want to pick the best pieces that are on top, which takes less than 30 seconds and seems pretty reasonable to me.

    But as you say, I am small potatoes to these yards, and that's just how it is I guess. My understanding is that home depot does large scale sales to contractors as well, and my experience in customer service says to always treat customers well, even if they're not your biggest money maker. After all, you never know if one day they will be. And the particular places I am talking about do market to homeowners refurbishing their homes, so non-industrial sales is part of their business, even if a small part.

    I don't know anyone in jersey with private property big enough to yield decent lumber, but I have gotten slash permits and harvested some wood from a few state forests. I suppose the local mills idea is a good one, but I kind of doubt my experience there will be much different, especially judging by the phone conversations I have had with a few of those "crumudgeons" already haha...

    Barry, I checked out the site of that lumberyard, looks good I will def call them tommorrow and see what they have. There is another one right across the border in upstate ny as well, Ridge supply corp, that has pretty good prices for clear wrc so I'm gonna try them too.

    Thorne I have read that thread several times, I don't remember anything about fasteners being mentioned but I could be wrong. I used fasteners on my first set of oars and they worked fine, I just left them in and filled the heads. Something about sheer forces on an unfastened glue joint that irks me, I don't know, a couple hot dip galvanized nails cost nothing and give me peace of mind...
    Last edited by peterchech; 03-10-2011 at 04:57 PM.
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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    This thread seems to match my own experiences and observations pretty closely. I was able to get my boat building wood from these sources.

    Houston Hardwoods in Houston, TX - http://www.houstonhardwoods.com - they knew and liked boat builders. They have both Marine plywood and dimensioned lumber.

    Harbor Sales in Sudlerville, MD http://www.manta.com/c/mmcmw8t/the-harbor-sales-company - marine plywood

    Hardwood Center - they had just about every species of wood that exists - http://www.hardwoodcenter.com/ - dimensioned wood and some marine plywood.

    Home Depot and Lowes - which has cedar and doug fir.

    For the cedar I was able to pick it without attracting any unwanted attention. Sometimes I came out empty handed though and went to another store in town. They always have Doug fir that is clear and straight.

    Another lumber yard - Wilsons - was pretty good when it came to house projects - they sourced me clear and straight 2x12 cedar for fence post tops.
    Will

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Shopping for lumber in a construction-grade lumberyard is a lot like shopping for dinner in the frozen food section of the supermarket. We boatbuilders are gourmets when it comes to wood. Like food, the closer to the source you can find it, the better quality it will be.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Kellogg's in Bethel, CT is not all that far away from you if you are in the NYC metro area. Google for their website. If you are looking for white pine (pinus strobus), the best places that I have found for that is at a local saw mill. BTW, I do not think that pine is suitable for oars, though I may be wrong.
    Steve Martinsen

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    I left Northern NJ in 77 for Oregon.

    Strange thing was back then we could buy redwood for decks in NJ and when i got to Oregon the Lumberyards had no redwood just Cedar.

    My Dad said in WW2 as a Seabee they had All old growth clear redwood in the Pacific..

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    I also struggle with the lumber issues here in Maryland. In Baltimore area there are two large yards that always give good service, with a smile, and let me look through their piles for the board(s) I want. Recently though, one of the yard guys told me that their inventory was way down, and would not be back until the home building situation turned around. They could not afford to stock the inventory they used to have. I wonder about the catch 22. If they don't stock the inventory, then builders won't buy there anymore and they'll never come back. At the other yard I just got a gorgeous 1x10 x 16' clear white pine plank for the bottom board of my new Adirondack guide boat. We also have a wonderful small local hardwood guy who i turn to for what I need when i'm looking for trim (cherry, mahogany, etc.), oars (ash), and other local species and some exotics.
    Peterchech, is Benjamin Brothers still in Tenafly? I grew up in Englewood and BB was always where I shopped for wood until I left the area in 1974.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by bobbys View Post
    I left Northern NJ in 77 for Oregon.

    Strange thing was back then we could buy redwood for decks in NJ and when i got to Oregon the Lumberyards had no redwood just Cedar.

    My Dad said in WW2 as a Seabee they had All old growth clear redwood in the Pacific..

    I've got a pretty big stack of old growth clear heart redwood that I salvaged from a pool surround and the matching deck.

    About a dozen 1 X 10 X 20 feet long, and maybe half that many 5/4 X 8 X 20s. There's a whole bunch of 'lesser' pieces, including many 4 X 4s in lengths to about 8 feet. (And yes, that was a drive-by gloat!)

    I'm wondering if this stuff would make decent SOF boat frames? I know it tends to catastrophic failure without warning, when bent to the breaking point, and I'm a little leery of it.

    Any suggestions, fellas, or should I start my own durned thread?

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Great customer service from our local lumberyard, Dillman & Upton, but I also understand they are a lumber yard, not a specialty wood dealer. Their guys will pick though a pile for me, and have even opened a new bundle to find some better pieces for me. They carry (ar used to) clear western pine in thicknesses up to 5/4 but it isn't inexpensive.

    Armstrong Millworks in Milford, Michigan has a large building and a barn full of unplanned kiln dried hardwoods, mostly north american and mahogany. They work on the basis that the customer sorts through the piles themselves. And the customer is also expected to leave neat stacks after they are done.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    A quick google of "Sawmills in New Jersey" yields:

    EASTERN PREMIUM WHITE PINE S/4/S
    PRICING PER LINEAR FOOT
    SOLD ONLY IN 2" INCREMENTS
    FROM 8'-16'
    1 x 4 $0.50

    1 x 6 $0.75

    1 x 8 $1.00

    1 x 10$1.25

    1 x 12$1.50



    5/4 x 4$0.78

    5/4 x 6$1.31

    5/4 x 8$1.55

    5/4 x 10 $1.93

    5/4 x 12 $2.32

    From Boards and Beams
    1275 BLOOMFIELD AVE.
    FAIRFIELD, NJ 07004
    BLDG#10
    TEL: (973)299-6100

    http://www.woodboardsandbeams.com/
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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    Shopping for lumber in a construction-grade lumberyard is a lot like shopping for dinner in the frozen food section of the supermarket. We boatbuilders are gourmets when it comes to wood. Like food, the closer to the source you can find it, the better quality it will be.
    Never has Bob Cleek been so accurately succinct. I want to save that quote for posterity! Looking for good stuff at any commercial lumber yard can be an exercise in frustration. But, that doesn't excuse rude behavior by the staff. Any customer, no matter how small, is valuable; if only for good public relations. I once bought 2 quarts of paint from George Kirby and got a hand written note of thanks with some application tips. There were a few grease marks on the paper-he had just finished fixing his kid's bike! You cannot fake that kind of service. Rick

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    I can only immagine the customer service in NY, NJ isn't very friendly, but I'm in Va and Md seems like another country to me. At any rate- when I'm looking for decent stock in 6/4 x (as little as) 3" wide, I look at the pile of 2x12s and 2x10-16's. Usually, I find what I need, taking into consideration that I'll get a good rip off of either side and a peice of firewood from the middle. There's usually some decent stuff burried in a pile of 2x12-16s.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    The nearest specialty yard is in Fort Collins, CO, a 4 hr. drive. But I've gotten to know a couple staff at the local lumberyard who will let me wander and poke in obscure corners, because they know that if I find what I need, I'll buy it and won't give them any grief leaving stacks disarranged, etc.

    What's good for my projects is often old stock, unlikely to sell otherwise. For instance in the far corner of the upstairs rummage bin, I found old 14 ft. tongue and groove fir flooring, beautiful straight close grain with a pronounced curve, that was perfect for the coamings on my skiff. They were glad to get rid of it, and charged me about 40 cents on the dollar.

    I print out photos of each project and take them in next time I go, to show my appreciation. When I walk in, a couple of the younger guys I've dealt with make a special effort to come over and help me.

    So I'd hate so see them close.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    I can't complain. I have several local lumberyards who are holding their own vs, the big boxes. In addition to doing a better job with milady's birdseed and shades of pant that only Martha Steward would love, they do a good job of supporting quality builders. They stock C select pine in 4/4, 5/4, and 8/4 and VG Douglas fir in 1x4 decking up to 20', several widths of 2x and 4x4's, in addition to redwood and red cedar.
    I don't observe that the big box stores are doing well in their lumber lines.

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    I've got a pretty big stack of old growth clear heart redwood that I salvaged from a pool surround and the matching deck.

    About a dozen 1 X 10 X 20 feet long, and maybe half that many 5/4 X 8 X 20s. There's a whole bunch of 'lesser' pieces, including many 4 X 4s in lengths to about 8 feet. (And yes, that was a drive-by gloat!)

    I'm wondering if this stuff would make decent SOF boat frames? I know it tends to catastrophic failure without warning, when bent to the breaking point, and I'm a little leery of it.

    Any suggestions, fellas, or should I start my own durned thread?
    Start your own thread.

    But to your question--redwood is for decks, not for boats. DAMHIKT.
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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    I have begun collecting good wood while the gettin is still good.
    500 BF of Alaska Yellow Cedar for $700, Yesterday 11 mar 11

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by MiddleAgesMan View Post
    Start your own thread.

    But to your question--redwood is for decks, not for boats. DAMHIKT.
    +1 for not using redwood in a boat. I built a table out of it. It's a very light weight and soft wood and yes brittle. For various parts of the table I had to use pine and white oak to make it work.
    Will

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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by willmarsh3 View Post
    This thread seems to match my own experiences and observations pretty closely. I was able to get my boat building wood from these sources.

    Houston Hardwoods in Houston, TX - http://www.houstonhardwoods.com - they knew and liked boat builders. They have both Marine plywood and dimensioned lumber.

    Harbor Sales in Sudlerville, MD http://www.manta.com/c/mmcmw8t/the-harbor-sales-company - marine plywood

    Hardwood Center - they had just about every species of wood that exists - http://www.hardwoodcenter.com/ - dimensioned wood and some marine plywood.

    Home Depot and Lowes - which has cedar and doug fir.

    For the cedar I was able to pick it without attracting any unwanted attention. Sometimes I came out empty handed though and went to another store in town. They always have Doug fir that is clear and straight.

    Another lumber yard - Wilsons - was pretty good when it came to house projects - they sourced me clear and straight 2x12 cedar for fence post tops.
    +1 on Houston Hardwoods! I don't know about shipping, but they've got a great selection and encourage customers to wander around and dig through their stacks--just neaten up the piles when you're done. They also do onsite milling if you want. Both rough and milled stock available. Another is Clark's Hardwoods in the Heights (also Houston). Multiple warehouse buildings filled with rough and milled.
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    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Peter,
    That is a tough one and lots of good points made here. Your average lumberyard has no interest in someone picking through the piles-and understandably so-two things I have found that may be helpful (I am in NY metro area also) - hate to say it, but the big box stores will let you pick to your heart's content-I managed to recently find some pretty nice 2x6 and 2x10 fir at HD after lots of picking, the rest is all SPF junk. Other than a Condon's - which is a great place and has wood to make you drool and is very used to fussy buyers - I found some beautiful clear fir at Ring's End in Darien, CT a couple of years ago - back in the sheds buried, really nice stuff and once of the guys there was great about my picking though it. But, your local, contractor oriented, studs outside in the rain and ply under the shed yard (killing themselves to survive these days btw-forget it). I guess the idea of buying boatbuilding quality wood at construction grade prices at the local yard is well, ah...not happening...

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    Tewksbury, NJ (Florida Transplant)
    Posts
    584

    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    I live more western NJ, near Clinton and my 2 local lumberyards (Fox and Huston) have been friendly enough to allow me to roam and pick, mostly DF and some construction grade spruce. But I get my "good" wood (Black locust, white oak, ash) from the local one man sawmill: http://middlevalleylumber.com/

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Downingtown Pa (S/V UTOPIA down in Somer's Point, NJ)
    Posts
    2,462

    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Down near Atlantic City is Schairer Bros... That's the place to get locall cedar and pine, both yellow and white.
    There is a joy in madness, that only mad men know. -Nieztsche

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,165

    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Yeah, as was said above, if you want to try to find clear or decent softwood with very small knots, look at the 2 x 12 pile.

    You can't get a 2 x 12 x 22' out of a small tree. It has to come from a large one. And there is a greater chance of getting a clear run.

    Less wastage than you think. (But you've got to have a table saw.) I have a rack in the rafters of my shop with the ripped lengths remaining of the last one I bought. I'll use them on my next canoe.

    Dave

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The heights of High Wycombe, not too far from River Thames
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Reading this thread is a bit of an eye opener, as I had been under the impression that the USA was overflowing with great timber for building boats. However, contrast your situation with us in the UK. A Google search for marine ply yielded just these sites. Clarks (includes Goldberg) & Robbins are the acknowledge specialists.

    http://www.clarkswood.com/certified.html

    http://www.goldberg.uk.com/

    http://www.robbins.co.uk/

    http://www.southern-timber.co.uk/gbu...ly_marine.html

    http://www.totemtimber.co.uk/product...e95bbf926.aspx

    http://www.dobuilddirect.com/www.dob.../info.php?p=25

    http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=mar...GGL_en___GB351

    Glen-L provides a better list than Google. Ten possible suppliers in New Jersey.

    http://www.glen-l.com/resources/lumber-suppliers.html

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The heights of High Wycombe, not too far from River Thames
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Here is another NJ lumber supplier.

    http://sjlumbermans.com/

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    northern new jersey, usa
    Posts
    797

    Default Re: death of the local lumberyard: good riddance?

    Quote Originally Posted by SMARTINSEN View Post
    A quick google of "Sawmills in New Jersey" yields:

    EASTERN PREMIUM WHITE PINE S/4/S
    PRICING PER LINEAR FOOT
    SOLD ONLY IN 2" INCREMENTS
    FROM 8'-16'
    1 x 4 $0.50

    1 x 6 $0.75

    1 x 8 $1.00

    1 x 10$1.25

    1 x 12$1.50



    5/4 x 4$0.78

    5/4 x 6$1.31

    5/4 x 8$1.55

    5/4 x 10 $1.93

    5/4 x 12 $2.32

    From Boards and Beams
    1275 BLOOMFIELD AVE.
    FAIRFIELD, NJ 07004
    BLDG#10
    TEL: (973)299-6100

    http://www.woodboardsandbeams.com/
    I can guarantee you that is not clear wood.

    But thanks for all the advise! I def have some good leads here. I have already decided to start my oars in 2x4 grade 2 fir (ripped to avoid knots), I must make paddles too so I'll prob do them in ripped 2x4 whitewood, which is significantly lighter (if not as strong). However the next time I will have plenty of new places nearby to call, thanks to this forum. Awesome! Thad especially, thanks I will def check them out.

    As far as Redwood for SOF, I believe Dave Gentry (fuselage SOF guru on this forum) has used redwood on several of his SOF designs. I don't think it is a problem at all. If anything just increase the scantlings slightly. But Dave is really the expert on that, maybe pm him.
    “The difference between an adventurer and anybody else is that the youthful embrace of discovery, of self or of the world, is not muted by the responsibilities or the safety-catches of maturity.” Jonathan Borgais

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