Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 52 of 52

Thread: For the lovers of pilot cutters

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    32,517

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    Kindly Light being restored. Similar long straight aft run.



    Supposedly one of the fastest, she got a lot of business...but that's not neccesarilly the best seaboat. Led to more regulation of the pilot business.

    The earlier boats were like Henriette Marie. They have attributes worthy of attention. Vertical rudder (but more wetted area without being cut a way aft). More flare and flam forward for a drier boat (at the expense of wave makeing resistance), more tumblehome to keep the decks dry and put the shrouds inline, and a forward LCB for better low froude speed light air efficiency.

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    I'm not sure it was all the boat. I think it was the way he used it. I remember reading about the pilot. I think it was his style to go out further and stay out, looking for the best choice jobs. I think he borrrowed the money to buy the boat then had to work his socks off to pay it back, which he did quickly. I'll dig out Cunliffe's book, I think it might be in there. I think it was as much to do with his work ethic. I think the boat was built narrower than the one before which reduced it's wavemaking resistance, but which would have made it wetter and roll more.
    Kindly Light was certainly 3 foot longer than Alpha, I doubt that she would have been narrower.
    She was commissioned to be fast, as before the pilots were obliged to band together, every trip out was a race and her builder was specifically commissioned to build a boat to beat Alpha, his first commission from a pilot.
    The guy paying for Kindly Lights restoration told me that on one trip the Apprentice was returning home after shipping the pilot on a foul winters day. The weather was so bad that when he came to get way off her to pick up the mooring, he found all of the running rigging frozen solid. Not such a bad sea boat to live through that with a crew of one.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    507

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Kindly Light was fastest but the developments reputedly made her 'wet, tender and difficult to heave to'.

    The earlier boats may have more wetted area and wave makig resistance but would have been better to plank, a vertical rudder that won't float up, drier on the way out, hove to better in the lee of the ship then be less inclined to bury on the run back.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 04-12-2017 at 03:01 PM.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    32,517

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    Kindly Light was fastest but the developments reputedly made her 'wet, tender and difficult to heave to'.

    The earlier boats would have been better to plank, drier on the way out then hove to better in the lee of the ship.
    Better to plank? Alpha and Kindly Light were based on the Lancashire nobby, a form built in their hundreds in the NW, and indistinguishable in form from many Edwardian yachts.

    Whether or not she was wet and difficult to heave too, her owner with his intelligence network and her speed were so successful that they caused the reorganisation of the pilot service.
    She was supremely fit for purpose.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    507

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    I'm comparing the early to late pilot cutters.

    Yes easier to plank. The earlier boats have a full forefoot. West country practice is to make the distance from the fore foot to the top of the stem distance the same as the distance around the mid ship half section. You can then plank it up with straight standard untapered planks which is quicker. In use, hove to in the lee of the ship, it will also present more lateral resistance to the bow falling off the wind. The later boats traded a vertical rudder for reduced wetted area. Traded low speed efficiency for high speed efficiency. Traded greater bow flam and flare for entry angle.

    Arguably the free market drove them to became faster sailing boats to 'get the business' but at the cost of actually being worse pilot cutters to build and use.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    61,375

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Pegasus.



    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    61,375

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Cariad.





    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    32,517

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    I'm comparing the early to late pilot cutters.

    Yes easier to plank. The earlier boats have a full forefoot. West country practice is to make the distance from the fore foot to the top of the stem distance the same as the distance around the mid ship half section. You can then plank it up with straight standard untapered planks which is quicker.
    Sorry mate, that is total bollocks.

    Look at the midships girth and stem height on your own plan. Look at the depth at the stem and the depth midships, then add on the girth that gets you out to the beam. If you approximate the midship section to a quarter circle, the girth will be about 1 1/2 times the stem height.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    3,105

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Go Nick!

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    507

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Its in the books written by Percy Mitchell. They could use more uniform straight planks down more of the topsides to reduce labour. More plank width for fastenings too. You still see it today down there. Its simple geometry.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    61,375

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Yseult", 46ft



    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    61,375

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Mischief.

    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Falmouth England.
    Posts
    380

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Just as a point of interest "Yseult" was built by Martin Heard of "The other stuff" ! She lives in France I think.

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    32,517

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    Its in the books written by Percy Mitchell. They could use more uniform straight planks down more of the topsides to reduce labour. More plank width for fastenings too. You still see it today down there. Its simple geometry.
    OK, use it in the topsides if you want. That just means more shaping lower down. Win on the swings, lose on the roundabouts. Does that hold true on a counter, or does it only work on transom sterns like most Falmouth boats?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    61,375

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Burnett View Post
    Just as a point of interest "Yseult" was built by Martin Heard of "The other stuff" ! She lives in France I think.
    A good shape though !
    Last edited by PeterSibley; 04-13-2017 at 06:27 PM. Reason: typo
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Falmouth England.
    Posts
    380

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    A good shape though !
    Peter I agree,.Martin was a great friend of mine and I spent a lot of time around his yard, but I cant remember where the plans came from. I think it likely that, as she was built for a Frenchman, Jolie Brise played a big part.She was built upside down, after frames were raised and battened they laid Cflex (or similar) on the battens and then cloth over that.Subsequently a lot of fairing, but not a bad way of building a one off FG boat. I was tempted to have a go at a Malabar 2!
    Martin later built another much bigger ketch using ths same method.

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    61,375

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    I saw a Pete Culler schooner built that way, a great job too!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Perth Australia
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: For the lovers of pilot cutters

    Check out this beauty . How she sculpts her bow wave and then glides in the pocket between the wake . Minimal interior furnishings to show off magnificent construction . https://youtu.be/Gcnz3V-Fq5E

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •