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Thread: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

  1. #1
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    Default Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Hello

    Has anyone built one of these using the glued lap strake method?
    I'd love to do it in cedar, but I live in the desert now.

    Thanks!


    http://www.harrybryan.com/harrybryan...headPlan3.html
    Greg H. - from before the great crash, 20th century member 108

    “We will take America without firing a shot…we do not have to invade the United States, we will destroy you from within.” - Nikita Krushchev, Nov. 18, 1956

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    I keep checking this to see who has built one. SUrely someone has built one of these...? They are beautiful.

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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    I don't think there'd be the slightest problem whatsoever in adapting that boat from trad. lap to glued lap. And yes, i do think that would be a very reasonable thing to do for someone building a cartoppable boat for Arizona.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Okay, listen up people. Do you all want me to get divorced again? If someone doesn't step up to the plate here, I'm going to have to start one of these before I finish my Coquina. And that's with my house and shop still half unpacked after moving February 1st.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Ha Ha... I have the opposite, she's been waiting for me to start a boat, guess I have a project!
    I've been looking at the different lapstrake double canoes, and this one fits best.
    I wonder a bit about the wide flat bottom, and how to keep the plywood from 'oil canning' ... maybe a keelson???
    Need to order the plans.
    Hope she paddles as sweet as she looks... LoL

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Found this blog about building the 12' version in cedar.
    http://www.bob-easton.com/blog/?cat=7

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    With my Pooduck skiff, which is also three strakes and a flat bottom, the flat bottom is designed to be of thicker ply. I would presume on a canoe like this 4mm or 5mm would be suitable for the side strakes, and 9mm for the bottom. In which case I don't think oil canning would be an issue.
    The wife says I can have a mistress as long as she has ribs made of white oak.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    You're in luck. In WB issue 217 there is an article written by Harry Bryan about adapting traditional lapstrake to glued-lap. It even uses the Fiddlehead as one of the examples. Take a look - may be just what you are looking for.

    I been storing a bunch of juniper for over 20 years that would be perfect for the Fiddlehead and was giving this design some thought as well

    -G
    - Anything you can't have fun with is not worth taking seriously.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by esingleman View Post
    With my Pooduck skiff, which is also three strakes and a flat bottom, the flat bottom is designed to be of thicker ply. I would presume on a canoe like this 4mm or 5mm would be suitable for the side strakes, and 9mm for the bottom. In which case I don't think oil canning would be an issue.
    That strikes me as heavy for a canoe. I planked my Tamanu 20' outrigger in 4mm sides and 6mm bottom. Can't have a canoe that's too light IMHO.

    Dan

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    My blog about building a 12' Fiddlehead was mentioned a few posts back. Yes, I built traditional, as Harry designed it. I'm very pleased with the boat. My only mistake was mentioning to my wife that thought t a bit tippy. (That was actually my inexperience ... the boat is quite stable.) Because of that, when it came time to build her boat, we chose a CLC Mill Creek 13 glued lap boat.

    (blog: http://www.bob-easton.com/blog/?cat=7)

    It turns out that both are great boats and the Fiddlehead can actually be rolled over more than the Mill Creek, and I think the Fiddlehead turns a bit better than the Mill Creek. In the end, she likes the Fiddlehead better.

    But, that's not the question. Having used both construction methods, I can see that the Fiddlehead could easily be built as glued lap in plywood. Then, along came Harry's article which gives good specs on the plywood dimensions needed. So, RUN, don't walk to get a set of Harry's plans and WB issue #217.

    P.S. The bottom is thicker than the laps (either in cedar or in ply), and with 3 cross members (2 bulkheads and one frame) there is absolutely no oilcanning.
    Bob
    Mill Creek 13 build log: http://www.bob-easton.com/blog/?cat=18
    Fiddlehead build log: http://www.bob-easton.com/blog/?cat=7

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Must be a sign, just what I was looking for, thanks!

    I think the fiddle head would be a worthy use for that juniper..

    Quote Originally Posted by gazzer View Post
    You're in luck. In WB issue 217 there is an article written by Harry Bryan about adapting traditional lapstrake to glued-lap. It even uses the Fiddlehead as one of the examples. Take a look - may be just what you are looking for.

    I been storing a bunch of juniper for over 20 years that would be perfect for the Fiddlehead and was giving this design some thought as well

    -G

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Thanks Bob, I was wondering how she handled, it doesn't look to have much rocker, but then it's hard to tell from the online sketch.
    Nice job on that boat!
    Greg H. - from before the great crash, 20th century member 108

    “We will take America without firing a shot…we do not have to invade the United States, we will destroy you from within.” - Nikita Krushchev, Nov. 18, 1956

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    I built a canoe about that size (but a different design) that is 4 mm ply throughout. The bottom has a layer of dynel and epoxy for abrasion protection. I agree that 9 mm ply for the bottom would be over-kill. Keep it light. You'll be very happy you did. If you use one thickness of ply throughout, you'll also have less ply left over when you are done since you wont' have to buy a separate sheet for just the bottom.

    Brian

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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by esingleman View Post
    With my Pooduck skiff, which is also three strakes and a flat bottom, the flat bottom is designed to be of thicker ply. I would presume on a canoe like this 4mm or 5mm would be suitable for the side strakes, and 9mm for the bottom. In which case I don't think oil canning would be an issue.
    You may be right, 6mm may be enough. I am not sure how much stiffness is required for the keel plank or if the occupants are going to sit driectly on that plank. The Wee Rob I am currently building has a floor (deck planks) sitting on some partial ribs so you don't sit your weight directly on the bottom. Not sure how the Fiddleback is designed.
    The wife says I can have a mistress as long as she has ribs made of white oak.

  15. #15
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    Talking Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Hello! I've been snooping on this very educational and interesting forum for a while, but never had anything worthwhile to contribute. I am a HS math teacher, previously built a Bolger Gypsy, and wanted to try something more technically interesting. It also needed to NOT be another sailboat in order to gain support on the home front. A woodworker I spoke with with suggested the Fiddlehead. My wife liked the idea of a canoe that she and another person could launch and enjoy. Bob Easton's remarkable blog provided some more insight, and so I bought the plans and am currently building a 1/8 model just so I can see how it all goes together. Hopefully the model will save a few trips to the moaning chair.
    Anyway, I can tell you what Mr. Bryan suggests for plywood. The bottom is 3/8", the sides 1/4", and decking 1/8". He's pretty clear about not going with less. I plan to use plywood for the sides and bottom, but not the deck.
    I will be trying to locate marine ply today - 2 places I tried cannot get anything thinner than 1/2". Hope to start frames today.
    Should I order a copy of the article mentioned above? I don't know if it has more information that I've got now.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    I would be hesitant to go lighter than 3/8" on the bottom, unless you went 1/4" with some type of fore/aft stringers, which would add weight. Remember, we are talking about a flat bottom--you don't have the strength of the arch that you might have with other canoe designs. This is an uneducated opinion, but I am comparing this to the logic of say, a Railbird Skiff. IIRC, the double can be done for about 60-80lbs., still a lightweight boat. I don't know if I will ever build one, but I would trailer it under any circumstances.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by Math Man View Post
    Anyway, I can tell you what Mr. Bryan suggests for plywood. The bottom is 3/8", the sides 1/4", and decking 1/8". He's pretty clear about not going with less. I plan to use plywood for the sides and bottom, but not the deck.
    I will be trying to locate marine ply today - 2 places I tried cannot get anything thinner than 1/2". Hope to start frames today.
    Should I order a copy of the article mentioned above? I don't know if it has more information that I've got now.
    For Plywood: I've used both of these places, but haven't checked prices lately
    http://www.boulterplywood.com/
    http://www.clcboats.com/shop/boat-bu...-cedar-strips/

    You covered most of it, he talks a little about how to handle the laps using different thicknesses, but article is worth reading just to have the magazine!
    Greg H. - from before the great crash, 20th century member 108

    “We will take America without firing a shot…we do not have to invade the United States, we will destroy you from within.” - Nikita Krushchev, Nov. 18, 1956

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by davebrown View Post
    I would be hesitant to go lighter than 3/8" on the bottom, unless you went 1/4" with some type of fore/aft stringers, which would add weight. Remember, we are talking about a flat bottom--you don't have the strength of the arch that you might have with other canoe designs. This is an uneducated opinion, but I am comparing this to the logic of say, a Railbird Skiff. IIRC, the double can be done for about 60-80lbs., still a lightweight boat. I don't know if I will ever build one, but I would trailer it under any circumstances.
    That's my feeling too. 6mil on a flat bottom isn't much... and there may be a need of hard points for foot braces, and seats depending...

    If I was building a single, weight would be more of a focus. Water is a bit of a drive from here.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    I've built one of the 12' Fiddleheads boats traditional planking (WRC planks, clinch nailed). I love this design, it works well as a near shore coastal canoe here. I want to build the double version to replace a too heavy glued lap ply open canoe I have. My WRC FH is a little too fragile for my use at the beach so I'm planning on using ply for the next build, but only for the planks and bulkheads.

    What's the opinion around here on using a solid wood bottom as spec'd with ply sides? I know movement is a concern when mixing ply and solid wood but it seems that the small bottom size and use of 3 planks glued up would minimize movement enough to make this work. Any thoughts on that?

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Harry Bryans' Fiddlehead 14 Canoe

    John Brooks book on glued lap construction has a photo of the mold setup on one of his jigs for a "Fiddlehead" on page 65. Also photos and description of sheathing the bottom and garboard with xynole cloth on pages 132/133. Presume he used plywood planking.

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