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Thread: Garage lift

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    13

    Default Garage lift

    Hello,
    Newbie calling in again.........
    I bought a 20' Chris Craft Holiday which I wanted to store/work on her in my garage. I measured my garage which was 23'. No problem, right? What about the trailer? Aghhhhhhhh. It is 25. Cars are currently in the driveway and the boat is straddling the 3 car garage. Wife is thrilled :{
    I was looking at boat stands, etc but wanted a quicker/easier way to get her off and on the trailer without breaking the bank.

    I found these guys and this product:



    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200356724_200356724&issearch=103181

    I have a call into there support folks regarding: If my boat is approximately 2,500 pounds, can I use two of these (aft and fore) and be OK? They are rated at 2,000 individually. Probably a tough question for them to answer. There is a 3,000lb version as well, but I was hoping not to spend the additional dollars.

    Any thoughts on this or any other product that might fit the bill??

    Truly appreciate it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Dooral Dooral, Eastern Oz
    Posts
    48,664

    Default Re: Garage lift

    I've been talking to an engineer mate about the same issue for my Dragon - which weighs a fair bit more. We are drawing up a permanent structure, using two steel H beams.

    I wouldn't want to be swinging a ton+ off what you've shown there... and even with two, if "something" happens and it swings the weight onto one of those, you are well over capacity. Better to be the other way and have any individual component able to take more than what you will be lifting.
    Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountian lakes of Vermont
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    5,165

    Default Re: Garage lift

    I've gotten my 16' runabout on and off the trailer by using jacks and bit by bit inching it off the trailer onto blocks. Your system, while good, seems a bit expensive for a pretty simple operation. Would a tool rental place have something similiar? A lot less expensive then owning that expensive equipment.

    As for the wife, mine gave up years ago thinking that her car was going in the garage/boatshop!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    West Central Ohio
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: Garage lift

    Check out the car sites and get a car lift. Sure, you may had to take off the trailer tongue, but........you will also have a great car lift! Hopefully you ceiling is also high enough that you can park a car under the boat. I see many guys do that in my area.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Dooral Dooral, Eastern Oz
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    Default Re: Garage lift

    My main plan (apart from the occasional lifting of the Dragon) is to allow me to use one trailer for two boats. I want to be able to lift and store one boat in the carport, with the other boat on the trailer underneath it.
    Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Weston, MA/ Eggemoggin, ME
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Garage lift

    I have a 4 post lift that I use usually to store my '61 Porsche in the winter. Right now I have a 80% built sailboat under it. My wife is looking forward to the boats completion. I haven't the heart to tell her that this is not nearly as immanent as it appears.

    [IMG]
    Painted and rotated digitally by jlaupheimer, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]
    Centerboard in! by jlaupheimer, on Flickr[/IMG]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Gulgong. Central west N.S.W. Australia
    Posts
    1,004

    Default Re: Garage lift

    A friend of mine built a big twin axle trailer for hauling firewood. He beefed up the trusses in the steel garage roof, made a beautiful block and tackle from local hardwood, and just hoists the trailer up to the roof when he isn't using it- his land rover fits underneath. JayInOz

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,573

    Default Re: Garage lift

    I have the 3k version of that gantry. It's pretty solid and I wouldn't hesitate to use two for lifting a 2500# boat all day long. Another thought is - if you use the trailer to position the boat over the floor space you want it on when off, you can block up one end and use the gantry to lift the other while pulling the trailer out from underneath. That way, you'd save a few dollars by only having to buy one of the 2k (or better yet 3k) model. The gantry+trolley+chain lift will be a more expensive option than the jack and blocks approach no matter how frugal you are, but having been the guy trapped under 3k of machine once upon a time, I'm here to tell you that it's money well spent if for no other reason than you avoid crawling around under the boat.

    Just my $0.02

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
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    New York, NY USA
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    942

    Default Re: Garage lift

    If I understand you, the trailer is 2 feet longer than the garage is deep. Why not put a notch in the garage door to allow the forward 2 feet of the trailer to stick out? It would be something like a cat door but without the door. You would not have to keep lifting the boat on and off the trailer. And, the trailer would be out of the weather, just like the boat. Or am I not understanding the problem?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
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    756

    Default Re: Garage lift

    is there no way to make the tongue of the hitch removable? I am assuming that that is the part that is going to be too long. So 4 good through bolts and and some square pipe to make it come apart at the length of the boat?
    Freudian slips : when you say one thing but mean your mother.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    1,040

    Default Re: Garage lift

    Back it all the way in, put the tongue down on the floor so that the transom is as elevated as possible, carefully block up the transom, with braces between the blocks if necessary, lift the bow with a come along or winch, pull the trailer out, block the bow and let the weight down.

    You may have to reinforce the ceiling. A winch could be mounted on the wall and the line run up the wall and across the ceiling to a pulley right above the bow.

    This would be easiest if the transom overhangs the aft end of the trailer by a foot or so.

    A picture of your garage and another of the boat on the trailer would help.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    144

    Default Re: Garage lift

    There are trailer tongue hinges available. I installed one and saved 3'. Costs about $100. from West Marine. Check your main tube size and look.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    3,941

    Default Re: Garage lift

    If you can work on the boat while (not whilst) she is on the trailer, can you punch a descrete hole in the back wall, and let the tongue of the trailer sit in there for two feet? I mean, as long as you have a third (or fifth) wheel on the trailer and you can push the rig around by hand...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
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    jarvenpaa,finland
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    845

    Default Re: Garage lift

    modify the building, its much safer and cheaper, now is a time to tell the wifey you need to extend the garage!, if you need 2 ft then add 6ft, you only get to do it once and the more space the happier you will be
    There's one rich man onboard and there's twentyfive poor men and they enjoy it more then the rich man does -Jim Kilroy when asked if yacht racing is a rich mans sport.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Lexington, SC
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    3,260

    Default Re: Garage lift

    I use bottle jacks under the keel to move my 30' Express. I have not yet put her on a trailer but my plan is to use the bottle jacks and stands and repositioning everything as the trailer cross members get in the way. It will take time but I figure I will be doing it only twice a year.

    If I ever have to pull an engine I think I will invest in a chain fall and put some beams in the shop to support the weight. THe chain fall could then serve to lift half the boat if necessary
    Last edited by chuckt; 02-04-2011 at 10:40 AM.
    Chuck Thompson

    1955 18' Chris Craft Continental
    1950 30' Chris Craft Express
    1955 Concordia Yawl #26 (under restoration)

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
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    9,113

    Default Re: Garage lift

    Here you go...

    Just get out your hacksaw, it might take an hour to fit this folding tongue.


  17. #17

    Default Re: Garage lift

    Investigate the folding/swinging/removable trailer tongue as illustrated above.

    One of those gantry lift's is enuff. Lift up one end of the boat, block under it, move to the other end of the boat and repeat. A buddy and me lifted his 25 ft. Chris-Craft twin engine Sportsman utility off the trailer and onto a dolly with one home-built lift. Design is essentailly the same as the one from Northern Tool.

    The method of lowering the trailer tongue and blocking up the stern of the boat is easy peasy as well.

    I built into the roof structure of my garage beams and lifting points so I can use chain hoists to lift stuff up. I take boats off of trailers and hang 'em and then move the trailer out and roll in dollies and then lower the boat onto them. I have a 19 ft. cabin cruiser power boat that took me 20 minutes on my own (no help) to get off the trailer and onto dollies.

    Andreas

  18. #18

    Default Re: Garage lift

    Maybe a bit odd, but: I bought an engine hoist to install a diesel in my new boat, and have ended up using it everyday to move stuff around. 800 lb purpleheart keels, large timbers, band saws, whatever. And at $209 bucks, if it breaks I still got my money's worth

    http://www.harborfreight.com/2-ton-f...ane-35915.html
    ------------
    Eglantine
    37' Cutter
    Leslie Jean 15' Whitehall
    Le Petale, 7' Fatty Knees
    Avon, 8' Avon Inflatable
    Bish 30' Murray Peterson Schooner under construction
    http://bischoffboatworks.com

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
    Posts
    2,734

    Default Re: Garage lift

    You could make a lift like the one in your picture out of 2X6 doug fir lumber.
    We've got one in the shop at The WoodenBoat Foundation in Port Townsend WA.
    It's bolted together so it can be knocked down for storage and is used for your lift-her-off/on-the-trailer problem. Works great and it's relatively cheap.
    IIRC, the lift points are at the upper outside corners and the cross beam is mostly in compression.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    6,808

    Default Re: Garage lift

    I agree with Tom Robb about bolting together a frame for this. ( I did commercial construction and we did this when needed). If your boat hangs off the end of the trailer you might be able to push it back far enough to clear the door once the boat is off of it. If that doesn't work the tongue is probably bolted onto the trailer and you could dismantle the front of the trailer--put it back on when you need it.

    regards,
    Waddie

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Garage lift

    Thank you all for the advice. Much appreciated. My tongue has the braking system on it so I do not want to mees with that unless it is a simple thing.



  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Garage lift

    Hello again.

    Some pics below. None of her hangs off/aft of the trailer. Also, I just measure the width of the trailer and there will be a hair of space between the sides of the Nothern Tool crane. Too close for me. I will look to build one. I'd like to do it with steel. Not even sure where you buy that. I live in the Louisville KY area.

    Again, appreciate all the help. Newbie is learning......... And I thank you all.






  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    9,113

    Default Re: Garage lift

    They make quick couplers for the brake controller if you choose a removable tongue, or you can fit a longer flex line to accomodate a hinge.
    Both are common.
    edit to add; Nice Boat!

  24. #24

    Default Re: Garage lift

    1) That steel “A” frame is speced to hold the weight at its center…you don’t need that capacity. It also has to be structurally rigged; you don’t need that either because you already have something to use…your ceiling.
    2) Is the purpose to have the boat and car in the garage without the trailer? Said another way, the trailer will be outside or off site?
    3) It looks like you have a finished garage and the flippant “cut a whole in the wall” suggestions will not fly, probably a family room on the other side of the wall J However would you be adverse to marking up some of the drywall on the ceiling?
    4) You don’t want to cut up or modify a perfectly good trailer!!!!

    Below will work for I used it for four years to pick up 4,800 pounds.
    Items:
    1) (4) 2,000 pound capacity come-a-longs, the wire type will do and can be had for less than $40 each. Safety note, never unwind to the bitter end; you always want some wraps on the drum.
    2) 5/8” braided line to make slings… The lowest 5/8” line has a braking strength or 10,000 lbs. But it is really not an issue of the weight capacity and more distribution of the load….so several passes under the hull increases your load distribution and of course load capacity (5/8” + 5/8” + 5/8” + 5/8” is almost the equivalent of a 2” strap). Or you can purchase slings at your local rigging supply or industrial rigging supply, or industrial supply. If there is nothing in your area you can find something at McMaster-Carr. Pre-maid you’d be looking at under $100 each (you will need two). Pre-maid…piece of mind. Make your own…you can always change the length.
    3) (6) 4 x 4, you will have to determine the lengths.
    4) Material to make blocks to set the keel on once off the trailer. Never go under the boat without the blocks in place or a better mind-set, you always want something stronger and wider than you taking up the space between the movable object and an unmovable object…boat and ground.
    5) Material to make smaller blocks at the shine, outboard. They don’t have to be strong the weight will be on the keel; you just need something the keep the boat from tipping.

    Ok now here is the concept. If you don’t mind tying into your garage ceiling, all you have to really deal with is the vertical weight. The structure of your house will keep the frame from moving in your x and y. Of course while doing this the garage door will have to be closed as much as possible but by the looks of it you would only have one panel of the door still in the up position which should still give you enough room to make the frame. And once the trailer is unloaded you should still be able to slide the trailer out under the partially closed garage door. Once the boat is set down on the blocks you can remove part of the frame, which will then allow you to use, the garage door at will.

    General Concept, you will be creating a four-point pick:
    -4 x 4s on the ceiling running across the boat, one aft and one forward. 4x4 will do because you will be picking near where they will be supported at the ends by the 4x4 uprights. The key here is that you want to tie in as much as possible to the ceiling. This will depend somewhat on the direction that the floor joists are running, my bet is that they are running from the back wall to the garage door. You could actually start with a 2x4 screwed to every joist and then lag-bolt the 4 x 4 to the 2 x 4. You can create a gap in the 2 x 4 that will allow you to wrap a line or chain over the 4 x 4 to hook the come-a-longs to. If you want some additional piece of mind you can make the cross beams out of doubled up 2 x 6s.
    -Then attach the 4 x 4 uprights. They can be loose (1/4”), for you will use shims to account for any unevenness of the floor, take up any space and untimely make the frame stiff and secure. You will want to tie the top of the 4 x 4 upright to the cross beam with a small piece of plywood to prevent the tops of the upright from moving. Of course you will want to set the uprights as level as possible.
    -Attach the come-a-longs and the slings and you are set to go.

    If you want to message me off line I can send some pictures of what worked for me.
    N 42 53 49.48
    W 78 54 4.90

  25. #25

    Default Re: Garage lift

    You actually could get by with using those replacement basement posts sold at Lowes and Home Depot for use as your uprights.
    N 42 53 49.48
    W 78 54 4.90

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