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Thread: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

  1. #71
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    would a fan placed on the aft deck of a sailboat, in a flat sea and a dead calm, cause the boat to move forward or backward?
    Probably not, she'd sit quite still...

    Lovely boat!

  2. #72
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    would a fan placed on the aft deck of a sailboat, in a flat sea and a dead calm, cause the boat to move forward or backward?
    Well, that depends. Are we talking about a fan facing backwards, over the transom? Then yes, it would push the boat forward, just like the famous swamp boats in the Florida Everglades, with the giant fan blades on the back. Action = fan blowing air away from the rear of the boat; reaction = boat moves forward.

    Are we talking about a fan blowing air forward into the sails? Then no - at least presuming theoretical efficiency; that is, that the fan blows straight into the sail and the sail catches all of the air. In this case the action of the fan pushing air forward exerts a rearward force on the boat, but the air moving forward pushes on the sail.

    My high school physics teacher did this exact demonstration in class using a small model boat with a little electric fan on it in a tank of water. The fan spun and the boat just sat there.

    If you were to try this in the real world, you likely would get some movement in one direction or another due to ineffeciencies - i.e., the sail would not catch all of the air moved by the fan, and the boat probably would slowly slip backwards.

    Physics can be a bummer sometimes.
    - Bill T.

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    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  3. #73
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Quote Originally Posted by ILikeRust View Post
    Physics can be a bummer sometimes.
    Said the guy who's parachute didn't open...

  4. #74
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Happy New Year everyone! I hope it's a great one!




    After the strips were all faired, Sanda and I started applying the first of four layers of veneer. We laid the master plank amidships and proceeded forward and then aft at about a 45 degree angle to the base line. That’s Pooh in the bottom left hand corner of the photo slinking into the boat shed. She’s the cat that hated boats...




    …but loved ladders. When she was just a year old, we took her with us on a 3 month summer cruise around the Strait of Georgia in our 17’ Whitehall. After that, we were never able able to get her into another boat for love nor money! That glare kind of say’s it all.





    This next sequence shows the spiling method we used. Once a veneer was glued and stapled in place, we cleaned it up and used a small block of wood 2” wide to scribe a pencil line parallel to its outer edge onto the hull.





    After applying glue to the hull and the next veneer with wide nylon squeeges…




    …we stapled it in place so that its inner edge just slightly overlapped the pencil line, leaving a space a bit less than 2” wide between the two adjacent veneers.




    Where we didn’t want any staples left in the hull, we shot them through heavy plastic banding tape. This allowed us to remove the staples in one go by simply pulling up hard on the tape, after the glue had set. It worked pretty well. Any staples that got left behind were easy enough to remove with a staple puller or a pair of needle-nosed pliers.

    All the rest of the staples were left in the hull, except those in the last layer of veneers. This posed a bit of a dilemma for me though. The only non-ferrous staples that were available at the time for the Duo-Fast electric staple guns we were using were made of Monel - and outrageously expensive! It took some soul searching to decide to go with “galvanized” instead. But I figured it would be okay, considering the staples would be well buried and coated with Epoxy. I just couldn’t justify paying so much extra for something that would be contributing absolutely nothing to the overall strength of the hull. The staples were merely tiny little “clamps” that held the veneers in place long enough for the glue to set. After that, they were just along for the ride. I didn’t think the mass of any one staple that might corrode would be great enough to cause any real mischief. Today, I would use plastic staples and nails.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat



    We generally laid up several planks at a time, leaving the gaps in between to be dealt with later. After cleaning up any excess glue and letting things cure for awhile, we used this little router fitted with a home made guide to route out a perfectly parallel 2” swath between the two adjacent veneers - trimming off the edge that slightly overlapped the pencil line. This worked fine, but it did throw a lot of dust and debris around and we had to make sure we cleaned any up that landed on sticky surfaces before we carried on.




    After the swath was cut, we glued in 2” wide sections of veneer to fill the gap.

    The whole planking process was actually a no brainer. Once we got into the rhythm of the thing, it went surprisingly fast. Sanda and I worked well together and it was fun, but it went even faster after a couple of friends turned up quite unexpectedly one day and volunteered a few weeks of their time. It was amazing having a crew to work with. That was really fun!




    The second layer of veneers has now been applied to the port side of the hull.




    And a start made on the third diagonal layer.




    Finally, all the veneers have been applied, faired and sanded on both sides of the hull and made ready for sheathing with fiberglass cloth. Note, that in the last layer, the veneers were cut into 2” wide strips and laid up fore and aft, much like the inner strip-planked part of the hull. But this time we started the planking process from the mid point of the hull between the keel and sheer. It is clear that this created a much nicer and neater run to the planking than the mess we got into earlier with the strips. Sigh…

    At this point, we stopped to strike in the waterline. I used the "hose and water" method to establish a series of level reference points through which we ran a batten. I then penciled the waterline right onto the wood.




    Next, I measured off some points to establish and strike in the boot top. It was given a bit of sheer for looks: 9” above the waterline at the bow, 4” about 60% aft of that, and 6” at the stern. I wanted it good and high. Cruising boats are renowned for putting on weight over time. This was penciled onto the wood as well.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Crikey! That must be one seriously sturdy hull!

    Good thing you had the shop cat there to assist.
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  7. #77
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Quote Originally Posted by ILikeRust View Post
    Crikey! That must be one seriously sturdy hull!

    Good thing you had the shop cat there to assist.
    If you got her to stir up the epoxy you could call it meow mix......

  8. #78
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Looks fantastic, Don. Lovely job. Happy New Year to you, too - this will be a great year to launch a boat.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    I wish I hadn't found this thread yet. I feel an addiction coming on. Great work.
    Phil

  10. #80
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    oh crap. I am never going to get my own work done now. too many great threads to read on this forum.
    Freudian slips : when you say one thing but mean your mother.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Happy New Year Don!

    Love this build thread!! When epoxying those veneers, did you use your epoxy neat or with some sort of filler to keep it from sagging/running?



    Cheers!


    Peter
    Do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,do it,now!
    J.Lennon

    This boat was built with ten thumbs.No fingers were harmed in anyway.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Peter...at the time I was using a product called Zeothix, which was an additive with anti-sag properties, but is no longer available. I now use plastic mini-fibres from System 3. This is also an excellent anti-sag compound and I much prefer it over cab-o-sil. It is very easy to control the viscosity of the mixture with Epoxy resins and, even in small amounts, it inhibits sagging on vertical and overhead surfaces.

  13. #83

    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Awesome Don.
    This may be a newbie question, but, how did it not become a problem that you were driving in three sets of staples on top of one another? What would happen when a staple hit another embedded one?
    ~T

  14. #84
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Good question Toumbi, but I don't recall it ever happening. If it did, it certainly wasn't a problem. I expect it would have appeared as a crinkled (if that's the word) staple to be removed later. I do recall a few of those, but I never attributed them to the staple underneath. Could very well have been though.

  15. #85

    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Great thread Don... wow, that hull will be strong.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Hi Don.
    Now I know where you got all those great pieces of advice as I was building Rachel (Myst #2) -- the school of hard knocks! What a beautiful piece of work.
    Ted
    They believe everything they can prove, and they can prove everything they believe.
    -- Alan Furst. Red Gold

    Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of a cancer cell.
    -- Edward Abbey

  17. #87
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Thanks Peter, thanks Ted! Yup, this is my apprentice ship.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat



    Before moving on to the next stage, I discovered a small problem in one of the veneers that needed to be repaired. The process was simple. I set the router to the appropriate depth and cut out the bad section, taking care not to break through the glue line. I then cleaned things up with a sharp chisel.




    And glued and stapled another piece of veneer in its place.




    Once cured and cleaned up, it looked like this. Dealing with superficial damage was dead easy.

    In these last 3 photos, you can also see some of the gazillion little holes left in the wood after we pulled all the staples out. They would have been impossible to fill one by one and needed to be sheathed to seal them. A single layer of 6 oz cloth was used on Golden Dazy and I opted for the same. A heavier lay up of glass would have offered more abrasion and puncture resistance; but, here again, it was difficult to justify the added expense and time involved to apply something that would mostly just be along for the ride. The hull was plenty strong enough not to need any sheathing at all and I would have much preferred not to use any, but it was the only way to deal with the staple holes.




    I started the sheathing at the bottom so that I could staple the cloth to the hull along its upper edge to hold it in place.




    I laid it down dry and smoothed it out as much as possible before applying the resin. I was working alone on this and couldn’t chance doing a wet layup. It was also mid summer and very hot, which, in some ways, was a blessing. As we all know, Epoxy can take quite awhile to set, but at temperatures in the high 90’s it kicked in no time and reduced any tendency for the wetted out cloth to sag. On vertical surfaces like this, that can be a real headache.

    It all went well despite the fact that I had never sheathed a boat before - though I did have a bit of experience with fiberglass cloth on some smaller projects. To say I was a bit anxious at the start would be a gross under exaggeration. In fact, I was having fits!




    Here, the port side of the hull has been sheathed and I’m about to do the last layer on the upper starboard side. Wouldn't you know it - just as I was finally getting the hang of the job, it was done!

    I should note that I did not overlap any of the edges of the hull with the cloth. I didn’t want to chance creating a hard edge that could eventually crack under stress. After the Epoxy had set for a day, I trimmed the cloth back to the face of the inner keel and stems. These would later be capped with their mating outer components, locking in and protecting the edges of the sheathing.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat



    As you can see, it looks pretty good. Nice and smooth and shiny. Now, look carefully at the port side and you can see that things are a little less pristine. Actually, things are looking kind of crappy. I hadn’t quite mastered the smoothing out process at that point. It was so hot that the resin was setting up faster than I could get back to it to knock down the little dimples that form on the surface. These caused no harm to the integrity of the lay up, but did create a rather rougher surface than intended. The weave was well filled though (hot-on-hot) and this was strictly superficial.




    See what I mean about rough? Had I taken a bit more effort while the resin was still wet to knock down these surface dimples, the job would have been a whole lot easier. Oh well, live and learn.




    I resorted to the rotary sander I had discarded earlier to smooth down the surface. This was an awful job, as you can well imagine, and I was glad to be done with it.




    After smoothing the surface, I rolled on two more coats of resin for good measure and sealed all the mating surfaces. I probably didn’t need to, but it seemed like the right thing to do at the time.




    Then I sanded it all back down again!

    By now, you are all probably thinking the guy is an idiot. And, you probably wouldn’t be too far wrong, but I was flying by the seat of my pants and I wasn’t quite sure when to call it quits. Best to err on the safe side, I guess.

    All the outer capping pieces are finished and glued on and the hull is ready to be rolled over - coming up next.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    I've seen on a couple different forums and mailing lists recently discussions regarding "amateurs" versus "professionals." The reality is that "amateurs", because they are so nervous and obsessing about doing it wrong, actually can end up doing top-notch work. The main difference is that they might take a lot longer than the professional - but quite often they'll have greater attention to the little details, because they're sweating the small stuff as well as the big stuff and medium stuff.

    Can't wait for the next round of pics.
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  21. #91
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Too true, Rust. Both can possess equal skill and ability, but experience is what defines them.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    By now, you are all probably thinking the guy is an idiot.
    Actually, no. I was thinking "how in the bleepity bleep is he going to roll that massive thing over without killing himself or anyone else or doing serious property damage?"

    Which I'm sure we'll all know the answer to before too long...
    - Bill T.

    "How many politically-correct people does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

    "Look, I don't know, but that's not funny."

  23. #93
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat



    John Guzzwell’s book Modern Wooden Yacht Construction has a short chapter on turning the hull that I found very useful. It clearly lays out the steps required to do this task easily and safely.

    Before proceeding though, I thought I’d try this out on the half model first to see just what I was in for. I elected to use flattened hoops, thinking they would be faster to build than circular ones. But I didn’t like them. It quickly became apparent that the hull would need to be “flopped” around rather than rolled and this meant not only jacking the hull up, but also jacking it down again during the turning procedure. This felt a little risky to me. Circular hoops seemed a much better option.




    They weren’t actually all that difficult to make either and seemed pretty sturdy once fixed it place.




    None the less, I added a few extra cross braces for good measure. You will notice that the rockers sit on planks with pipes inserted between them. The shop was not wide enough to roll the hull in one go and it was going to be necessary to slide the hull sideways about half way through the operation.




    Here we go! About 30 people showed up for the turning and offered their help. I was grateful for the extra hands and it was a lot of fun. Kind of like an old style barn raising.




    We jacked the hull up and used braces and safety ropes to make sure things didn’t get away on us. I did have visions of crushed limbs.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat



    Especially at this point: this is where I figured the hull would over-centre rapidly causing it to flip...




    …onto these guys!




    As it turned out, nothing happened. The rig was so well balanced that we actually had to push it over. We’re all laughing here because I was so anxious about this moment and nothing came of it. Somebody was making wisecracks about my usual obsessive/compulsive approach to things. All the safety ropes, jacks, bracing and blocking were absolutely unnecessary. One person could have rolled the hull over without assistance.




    A little further over and then we had to stop and shift the hull back to the other side of the shed.




    I estimated the weight of the hull and bracing to be under 2000 lbs, more like 1800 lbs. It didn’t take much effort at all to move the hull sideways.




    It’s amazing what a few pieces of pipe between two planks can accomplish.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat



    A bit more…




    …and she’s done!




    All quite and settled for the winter – a time to dream.

  26. #96
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Well that was neat! Thanks for documenting.

    Brian

  27. #97
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Very nicely done. You may have gotten grief about being over-careful, but that's a lot better than the other way 'round, eh?

    I've have really been enjoying this thread & am looking forward to more (but it's OK if you take a break for now.... )

  28. #98

    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Looks like it's hovering in that last shot. Like it's a magical wooden airship. Give it a little push and it just drifts out the doors...I suspect it did indeed seem magical to see it upright at the time.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Yes, it was magical T. Real and not real, both at the same time...and daunting.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post


    All quite and settled for the winter – a time to dream.

    I don't know if you follow the restoration of the strip planked H28, but he ran into a little problem with the ends of the strips at the sheer. Not really a problem as much as having to re-think how to go about doing things. Are you (or did you) going to "cap" the strips with anything?


    NIce work on the rollover! Slick like a whistle.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

  31. #101
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    BB...there is a teak rail cap that fits over and covers the planking. You can kind of see it in the opening photo on page 1. There will be pictures and a description of it coming up soon.

  32. #102

    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Wow, that turnover was SLICK!!!!

  33. #103
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Bump. Fer gawdsakes man, have you no compassion at all? And don't gimme any crap about being busy either.

  34. #104
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    Patience, D….I’ve only just got caught up from my trip to the coast. New post tomorrow or Monday, for sure. But thanks for the bump!

  35. #105
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    Default Re: More photos of Don Kurylko's new boat

    I'd like to say we will launch this spring, but I'll hedge my bets and say probably sometime this year.

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