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Thread: Building a wooden barge

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Lake Champlain
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    1

    Default Building a wooden barge

    Hi, were looking to build a 12x 24 x 2 wooden, plywood work barge. Have been gathering all the info i can before starting from many sites. Any good advice. Have come up with a asic design using egg crae design and made almost completely out of plywood.

    Joe

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Ash, NC (not Asheville)
    Posts
    12,581

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    I'd be looking at some of the houseboat/shanty boat designs that are available and tailoring them to your needs.
    What type of work do you plan to do with the barge?
    Lake Champlain can get pretty rough. Will you stay in protected waters or will you need to go out in rough water?
    What kind of load capacity do you require?
    Do you plan to tow it or push it, or will you need the ability to do both?

    Doug

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tennessee River. Live on the boat, rent the shop. Life is Sweet
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    Atkins has a work barge design named the Giant. The below link will take you there. Just look through his Misc category.


    http://www.atkinboatplans.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Seabeck, WA
    Posts
    9,982

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    John Gardner's Volume I has a 14' scow I built to haul balks of cedar out of beaver ponds. It could be built plywood-on-frame as easily as cedar-on-frame, extended in length and beam, and the bottom flattened a bit to add stability.



    http://www.amazon.com/Building-Class...0965275&sr=8-2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    12,454

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    Quote Originally Posted by botebum View Post
    Lake Champlain can get pretty rough. Will you stay in protected waters or will you need to go out in rough water?
    8 ft. waves - even in some "protected" coves in the storm at the end of October. Plus - being a lake, they aren't rollers, but steep nasty waves.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    16,928

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    I'd build it as an overbuilt floating dock, with lots of these floats

    and 2 by stock on the sides, lots of it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    10,060

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    8 ft. waves - even in some "protected" coves in the storm at the end of October. Plus - being a lake, they aren't rollers, but steep nasty waves.
    I don't have any hesitation in saying that a 12' X 24' X 2' "barge," built out of plywood at that, has no business in sea conditions like that.

    Buck bet, you've never SEEN "steep, nasty, 8ft waves," let alone been out in them on a 24' sheet of plywood.

    Do your local coroner a favor and just don't go there..

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    12,454

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    I don't have any hesitation in saying that a 12' X 24' X 2' "barge," built out of plywood at that, has no business in sea conditions like that.

    Buck bet, you've never SEEN "steep, nasty, 8ft waves," let alone been out in them on a 24' sheet of plywood.

    Do your local coroner a favor and just don't go there..
    I fairness, I do have to say that these were extreme conditions: Winds @ 30 & gusting to about 60.

    However, steep 2-3 ft. waves are very common in the broad lake. When the wind is out of the north or south, you can easily get a 50+ mile fetch. The other problem is that depth varies from 5 or 6' in some large bays to well over 300' in the southern third of the lake - so conditions can vary hugely.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    7,324

    Default Re: Building a wooden barge

    FWIW My duck blind is built atop a barge--13 x 6 x 1. Proportions come close to what Mr. Smalser posted, though the bottom transitions to the ends in smooth, curved rocker rather than at an angle. The previous blind had a bottom that angled up and that one pitched and slapped alot (relatively speaking)in chop more than the new one. Of course the blind inst a working craft,like your barge will be, but we do spend whole days at a time in it, and the difference in comfort after a full day is appreciable.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

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