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Thread: Nymph Canoe Build

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    How did you find the twill cloth for wet-out? I don't feel that comfortable with it because I can't tell when it is properly wet out.
    Yes, I had that problem too. The approach I had to take was plenty of epoxy, roll, and then squeegee the heck out of it in search of a matte-like finish.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  2. #107
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Something you might try sometime is the home-made ethafoam squeegee, cut from a block of packing foam. They're disposable, free if you save chunks that come in boxes, adjustable in stiffness if you vary the thickness and they don't snag the cloth. They're pretty much the only squeegees I've used for 30+ years on both polyester and epoxy glass work and the typical plastic squeegee feels pretty crude by comparison - especially if you're trying to "comb" the surface down to a really nice, uniform, presentable finish.


  3. #108
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    I have a question about gunwales. I am going to use cherry inwales and ash outwales, unless I decide they are too heavy (but I am not overly concerned about weight). They are already milled out and feel reasonable. The plans call for lighter softwoods protected by glass and epoxy, and glued onto the hull.

    My concern is this - I have seen stripper canoes that have issues down the road with outwales needing replacement, but it can't be done easily if the gunwales are glued on. I was considering gluing on the inwales, but screwing on the outwales, like a wood canvas canoe, to allow replacement of the outwales, if necessary. I know this results in screw holes through the fiberglass wood core and a potential avenue for water to enter the sandwich as one concern.

    What are folk's thoughts on gunwale installation?

    Fitz
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  4. #109
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    We do it both ways.

    If you're planning to bond the gunwales on, it is reasonably easy to remove most of a damaged outwale mechanically and then use a scraper to remove what little epoxy is left behind. I know some will suggest the use of a heat gun to soften the epoxy, but I'm always a little nervous about doing this near your outer layer of glass for fear of doing damage to it.

    Alternatively, you could screw through the outwale, the hull and the inwale to make up a 'sandwich'. This is the easiest to remove. As far as penetrating the hull's core, depending on how you construct your gunwales (i.e. will they 'cap' the hull?) you may have more exposed area at the top of the gunwale than where the screws penetrate. I usually lubricate screws with beeswax before driving and haven't seen any issues with moisture intrusion. Besides - you should be varnishing over all of this anyway, right? That should minimize points of entry. If you are really concerned about it, you could put a daub of epoxy in the holes just before you drive the screws, but then you'd have to heat the screws to remove them.

    We've got some well used canoes that are now over 25 years old that have screwed-on gunwales. They've shown no issues in this area. I'd feel confident doing it either way that you are comfortable with. Because you'll store these boats under cover and put them away dry 99.9% of the time, I think you'll have few problems.

    As I mentioned before in other threads, if you keep up with the maintenance on a wooden canoe, you'll have few problems. I'd be more worried about damaging the 'glass under the waterline and continuing to use the canoe without repairing it.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  5. #110
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Personally, I would never, ever, glue the gunwales to a strip canoe hull - especially ash gunwales. First of all, it's just not needed. Secondly, I've just seen too many cases where the easiest way to deal with old gunwales is to replace them - and that's much easier if you can simply unscrew them. Leakage at the screw holes is not a problem unless you do something very strange during installation. As mentioned, you can always dip the screws in a little bit of something to bed them if you're worried about water penetration.

  6. #111
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    As mentioned, you can always dip the screws in a little bit of something to bed them if you're worried about water penetration.
    While I don't usually have a can of Dolfinite around - I'm sure Fitz does - that would be something to use here.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  7. #112
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    It seems to me that the inwales might need to be glued on - is this not the case?

    Thanks again for the input as we boldly go...

    Dolphinite - check.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  8. #113
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Fitz View Post
    It seems to me that the inwales might need to be glued on - is this not the case?
    Nope.

    Do be sure to clamp the whole mess up securely before screwing it together. Also, if you have short sections for scupper blocks, drill them oversize so they don't split AND/OR bond them to the inwale before installing. (DAMHIKT!) This is the sort of job where you'll want extra hands, too.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  9. #114
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Nope
    I guess I can see this.

    I realize it is a different system and pardon me for referring to my wood and canvas preferences, but in the wood and canvas case, the inwale is an integral part of the hull being secured at each rib location and at the decks and stem.

    It just seems to me that if I don't glue the inwale to the hull, then the inwale is not as secure as it could be and I am just relying on compression between the inwale and outwale and screws (thru the outwale, hull and into the inwale) to prevent the rail sandwich from moving vertically.

    I wasn't planning on scuppers, although they do let the water out.

    Come to think of it.....(Amazing how feeble my skull is)...I once helped a guy put new wood rails on a composite canoe and they were just screwed on....Ok, you have convinced me that it can be done.
    Last edited by Fitz; 04-01-2011 at 12:17 PM.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  10. #115
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Fitz View Post
    I guess I can see this.

    I realize it is a different system and pardon me for referring to my wood and canvas preferences, but in the wood and canvas case, the inwale is an integral part of the hull being secured at each rib location and at the decks and stem.

    It just seems to me that if I don't glue the inwale to the hull, then the inwale is not as secure as it could be and I am just relying on compression between the inwale and outwale and screws to prevent the rail sandwich from moving vertically.

    I wasn't planning on scuppers, although they do let the water out.

    Come to think of it.....(Amazing how feeble my skull is)...I once helped a guy put new wood rails on a composite canoe and they were just screwed on....Ok, you have convinced me that it can be done.
    Probably the most difficult thing is to come up with how you want the gunwales to look. (Do you cut them into the deck a bit, do you let them "die" at the deck's edge, etc...) Do you want something fancy at the bow (wraparound) or something simple (bevel cut mating to stem) Also, be sure to measure, mark and cut the inwale very carefully. With the piece flexing around, it can be hard to get the proper fit and a good angle at the end of the gunwale. Cut one end, install the gunwale and scribe where it meets the deck at the other end. Alternatively, you could run the gunwales up to the inner stem and put a cap deck on the canoe hiding it all. (I personally prefer the inset decks - I think cap decks look like an afterthought.) You may also wish to cut the inner stem down from the sheer by the thickness of decks and/or inwales so the stem can run right up the front of the hull.

    Lotsa ways to skin that cat, Fitz. Make some sketches of what you want first and prowl books and the web to see what appeals to you.

    One caution - if you install your decks first (with screws) make some pencil marks on the deck to know where NOT to drill the screws for the outwale. Also, Fuller bits are a wonderful thing. Don't forget that if you don't want to see the screws you can plug the holes or you can install them from the inside of the hull.
    Last edited by Canoez; 04-01-2011 at 12:11 PM. Reason: Caution!
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  11. #116
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    You also have to consider that in terms of bond strength with epoxy, you're usually talking about the grain strength of the wood being the weakest link (the wood will tear before the epoxy lets go). In a stripper, the weakest link is most likely going to be the bond of the glass to the strip core, since it's the bond to the wood with the lowest grain strength. If push comes to shove with a glued-on gunwale, you're more likely to peel the glass from the core than the gunwale cleanly from the glassed hull. It's not a huge deal, but I'd personally rather not have stress applied to the gunwales trying to delaminate my hull.

  12. #117
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Not much new to mention on the canoe build. Baseball season has started and we are travelling to Rhode Island for much of the weekend. Brendan's team won both games of a double header and Lefty Fitz and his natural lefty curve served as a dynamite closer during the second game. I was sitting at the top of the bleachers and got nailed in the back of the neck, right on the spine at the base of my skull, from a foul ball from an adjacent field yesterday.

    That smarts wicked let me tell ya fellas...

    I did steam bend the pieces of ash for the outer stem laminates this morning. The strips are only 1/8 inch thick, but I didn't think I could coax them into shape and glue them up without eventually breaking something, so into the steam box they went. I'll glue them up in the next day or so after they dry.

    Maybe THREE games today if they keep winning in the tournament. You gotta love baseball.





    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  13. #118
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    I probably need some commentary from the Cat, or maybe the little wooden guy from the other post, but this is my first major setback in my opinion.

    I bent and laminated outer stems on the stem form. The laminations are fine, extremely rigid, but there is no way the new outer stems are gonna fit on the hull.


    I can likely get it a bit closer than what is shown in the picture, but not much. I'm not exactly sure what the issue is. I have bent and made a number of stems before, but never outer stems. These outer stems fit the stem forms very closely, and there was virtually no spring back, so all I can figure is that I need a form with the outside radius of the inner stem even to come close.

    So, I guess I will either make a new stem form using the stem profile of the canoe, bend new stems on the outside of my new outer stem laminations, or come up with a way to bend the outer stem right on the canoe.

    Other than that, it is going pretty well. My inwales are tapered and fitted. I need to install them. I'm still debating a few things about the outwales and I want to get the outer stems on before tapering the outwales. I found a nice piece of cherry to make decks out of, and I'm designing a seat and some thwarts, also to be made out of cherry.

    I shall carry on.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  14. #119
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Good thing for a WoodenBoat Project Build Thread...if you note on post No. 11, of this thread, I mention the stem at the first station is 1/4 inch too low (and it does seem that the bloody cats are to blame!!). I had forgotten this. That explains some of the issue, but not all.

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    We bumble through and end up where we end up. Here's an other imperfect solution. I recollect that I laminated the outer stems in place.



    Next time, I'll wrap the stem bang strip another 1" across the inner stem onto the breast hook and i'll run the inwales farther and taper them more delicately..

  16. #121
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    As far as the stems go, you have two good choices. The first is to laminate the stems on the boat itself. The second is to trace the profile of the hull as it stands to create a new form and then apply the new stem to the hull. (Be careful to keep whatever you're using to mark the new pattern perpendicular the the hull's centerline.)

    Because you've already removed the hull from the forms, the forces applied to hold the stems in place and the lack of places to attach any clamping will make things quite difficult for the first method.

    Personally, I'd shoot for the second method.

    Molding the stem around the stem forms will not fit - ever. The problem is that that is the exact shape of the inner stem. If you offset by the thickness of the inner stem, you might have a fighting chance, but only if you've trimmed the hull back to the inner stem.
    Last edited by Canoez; 04-06-2011 at 08:55 PM.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  17. #122
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Molding the stem around the stem forms will not fit - ever. The problem is that that is the exact shape of the inner stem. If you offset by the thickness of the inner stem, you might have a fighting chance, but only if you've trimmed the hull back to the inner stem.
    In hindsight, I think I should have bent the inner stems and the outer stems on the stem forms at the same time way back when.

    In this case, the hull is trimmed back to the inner stem or at least very close to it.

    Thanks, I will keep plugging.

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  18. #123
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Fitz View Post
    In hindsight, I think I should have bent the inner stems and the outer stems on the stem forms at the same time way back when.

    In this case, the hull is trimmed back to the inner stem or at least very close to it.

    Thanks, I will keep plugging.

    Fitz.
    Yup, that's one way - I've found that you need to keep the outer stems restrained while you build the rest of the boat to keep them from relaxing.

    I was thinking about it a little more. It is possible to laminate stems in place if you cut them just a bit thinner.

    Drill a small hole for a wire nail (#18 or so) through the pack of strips about an inch or so from the end at the keel end. Make up some small pieces of stock - say 1" wide, 1/4" thick and 2" long with under-size holes for the nails. Tape these small pieces on what will be the side against the stem.

    Glue up the strips and with another pair of hands, apply the pack of strips to the hull and drive the nail into the inner stem at the keel. Working from keel to the point of the bow, bend the strips along the curve and drill and nail through the stems every 4" or so - drill and nail as you go. When the glue is set, pull the nails and small pieces of stock. Be wary about driving the nails all the way through the inner stem.

    This is why I laminate on the hull before glassing.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  19. #124
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Yes, I think I have to try some variation of this. Based on the previous bending performance of my strips, I think I will have to pre-bend them. I could probably pre-bend them on the stem forms and then laminate as you suggest on the canoe.

    The only problem I see is the need to shape the stem on the canoe, but that shouldn't be a big deal.

    Thanks!
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  20. #125
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Quote Originally Posted by Fitz View Post

    The only problem I see is the need to shape the stem on the canoe, but that shouldn't be a big deal.

    Thanks!
    Just be careful with the edges of the 'glass not to run into them with a plane and cut/tear the cosmetic surface. You're going to be applying a bias-cut strip of glass over the stem after you're done, so minor scratches should 'vanish'.

    Will you be applying stem band?
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  21. #126
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Will you be applying stem band?
    Well, stem bands are surprisingly heavy, but in this case they would be relatively short. I think it may be wise to go with one to assist with the wear and tear on the ends of the canoe.

    I roughed out a new cherry seat frame and some cherry quarter thwarts early this morning. Later tomorrow I will tackle the outer stems again.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  22. #127
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    I have been very busy with baseball. Brendan's team is doing better than the Red Sox at 7 and 1 right now.

    I did get the outer stems on. I laminated them on the canoe.

    I steamed them and pre-bent them on the form. Then I put dooky smutz on a portion of the stem and thickened epoxy on a portion of the laminations - then drove this mess home (drilled a pilot hole too). Then I repeated the process to just beyond the second screw, drove that one home and finished up the same way to the sheer line. The screws were heavily lubed, so I'm hoping they will come out.





    I was going to use the wire brad trick suggested by canoez above, but the spring back on the strips, even though they were steamed and pre-bent, probably would have pulled the wire nails, and after experimenting a bit it seemed the three screws would pull everything together nicely.

    I also made a seat and some quarter thwarts the other day. They just got their first coat of thinned varnish.



    I will hand cane the seat using rather large common cane to hopefully make it a bit more durable.

    The thwarts are a rough copy of a center thwart from a Maliseet, St. John River, birch bark canoe circa 1830, courtesy of Tappan Adney.

    Next step is gunwales, and shaping the stems after they cure for awhile.

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  23. #128
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Nice seat and quarter thwarts - unique shape - was this intended to be functional as well as aesthetic?

    Stem is a wee bit thick, there, but nicely bent. We usually bend up enough laminates that we have one more strip than the height of the hull where we've cut in for the stem. This gives us some material to remove. Also, I think I previously mentioned that you want to keep the laminations in the order they were cut from the board to help when shaping (not so much tear out as with alternating strips.

    Couple things to be wary of - first is the dookie schmutz on the hull. In future, masking tape is your friend... Saves lots of work. Second, when shaping the stem, keep in mind that you'll want to try to keep it's thickness uniform in profile and end-on. (Unless you're looking for a particular appearance...) Some hull shapes make for a stem that "splays" a little if you take it too far back along the keel.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  24. #129
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Nice seat and quarter thwarts - unique shape - was this intended to be functional as well as aesthetic?
    The shape was functional on the original 1830 bark canoe. The design was used on a center thwart and the notched/diamond shaped areas held the tump line and kept it from slipping.

    They are more aesthetic on this canoe since the quarter thwarts will not be used much, but they are quite sturdy (1/2 inch thick cherry - I couldn't break one if I tried) and this canoe hopefully will not weigh much, but that remains to be seen .

    I agree with the comments on the outside stem. I originally thought that Nick had way too beefy an outside stem on his canoe. They just seemed to look huge compared to the canoe. I was planning to come up with something more dainty and in-line with my vision , but ultimately went with the dimensions on the drawings. The pictures are a bit deceiving. The laminations are only 3/4 inch thick (but they still look huge!). Another point that swayed my thinking is that I went with laminated white cedar inner stems and thought that a bit more beef outside may be a good thing.

    I did keep the laminations in order, so I'm hoping that helps in the shaping.

    I should be messing with gunwales soon. There will be a great deal of sanding and varnishing to come. I was hoping to tie this canoe up by the end of the month.

    Cheers,

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  25. #130
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Gunwales....

    If there is anything I can't stand, it is gunwales that are not square to the hull. The top of the gunwales should be flat. I clamped the inwales on today and the inwale rolls over slightly. Not good to my eye.

    It is close, but due to the tumblehome in this canoe, I think the inwales and the outwales need a bevel - amidship - to make the top of the rails flat. This was commonly done in the old days with wood and canvas canoes.

    I think this slight roll has been ignored in previous versions, but I think it deserves the extra time for a bevel to make the rails square. Then it will sit on the roof rack for one thing.

    I'm gonna take a stab at it.

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  26. #131
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Done.

    Inwales got beveled and I am much happier with the way they fit the hull. I glued the inwales on and there are so many clamps in the way of the view, that I am not sure how fair this will all be when said and done. I positioned the inwales at the center of the boat and at the ends, and then let the inwales fall where they were in search of that fair inwale line. I should know more when I can take all the clamps off.

    Outwales will be screwed on. Decks and outwales next.

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  27. #132
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    The cherry inwales are in. I was pretty apprehensive about this step. It seems to me the adding of the rails on this canoe is largely hit or miss, unlike wood and canvas canoes where the inwales are locked in place on the form first. I pretty much let the rails fall where they would. I have viewed the hull from every narrow angle available to me in the 18th century basement workshop and the hull appears fair and fine.

    The center thwart is temporary and is serving to maintain the hull width until the gunwales go on.




    I have looked the canoe over and it appears to be nice and fair at this point.



    I will return my attention to the shaping of the outer stems next. Decks/breasthooks are being planned. Then I have to install some rails in the bilge to accept the seat. Then lots of time sanding and varnishing.

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  28. #133
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    I have been busy with lots of other things, but I'm still plugging away on the trim.

    The laminated ash outer stems are on the boat, all shaped and ready for glass. I don't have pictures of these yet, but I'll post some as soon when I get a chance to shoot them. I spent over an hour on each one, and there is a bit more fine tuning before they get glass reinforcement, but they are very close.

    Late today, I rounded over the top outside edge of the ash outwales and tapered each of them for the first couple of feet on each end.



    I used a tapering jig to taper the outwales:



    I roughed out a couple of bookmatched cherry decks. These are very rough at this stage. If I can get these to work, they will get dressed up and will be much more shapely.



    Cheers,

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  29. #134
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Fitz,

    Looking good still.

    You shouldn't need to glass those gunwales unless you want to. The ash will need good varnish (and upkeep) to keep from turning black. You could epoxy coat and then varnish over the epoxy if you want really great durability, but I think the cloth is overkill for such a hard wood. Don't forget that Nick was glassing these gunwales because he was using softwood for the gunwales and was trying to prevent mechanical damage to the gunwales.

    Pretty decks!
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  30. #135
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Yep canoez, I was planning to avoid the glassing of the rails. The decks, and gunwales will just get varnish. I may brush some epoxy on the glass/wood core edge that is exposed between the gunwales to improve the seal, but otherwise just varnish.

    Thinking about it a bit, I may have been able to center the grain better on the decks if I had slowed down and thought about it more. I was pressed for time. No biggy. If I can get the fit right, I will make them more shapely and use them.

    Still plugging...
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  31. #136
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Hello Fitz,

    I'm really enjoying this thread. For those decks: if you split each one down the center, swap the halves, and then re-glue them, they will each be almost symetrical across the center-line. You may have already though of this. Otherwise, I think they already look pretty slick.

    How about that marathon yesterday?

    Brian

  32. #137
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    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    How about that marathon yesterday?
    I caught the last hour on the TV after all the Patriot's Day activities here in town. My kids were wondering what all the screaming was about.

    The winner trains on his own. He beat all the other Kenyan XC runners earlier this year by 45 seconds. He made it look easy. I think he could go substantially faster too.

    Ryan Hall ran the marathon faster than any American ever has yesterday and finished 4th.

    Astounding.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  33. #138
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Concord, Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,140

    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Here's a question for ya. Where does the seat go?

    Having never built, paddled or dealt with a solo, double paddle canoe, where do I put the seat? It will be mounted on low rails glued and glassed onto the hull bottom.

    I'm inclined to put it dead center in the canoe unless there is a better idea.

    The outer stems are glassed, the decks are all cut and shapely now. I have also been sealing things with thinned varnish. I should have all the assembly done by the weekend. Then I want to move it outside for sanding.

    Fitz.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  34. #139
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    12,678

    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    Aha.

    Didn't Nick specify a distance in his plans?

    The leading edge of the seat (Specifically for small solo canoes, but for all canoes, generally) is where a paddler's weight is about evenly distributed. For a small double-paddle canoe, you want to put that leading edge of the seat at the center of the canoe. Take a piece of PVC pipe and put it under the keel of the canoe perpendicular to the keel-line. Move the canoe back and forth until it balances. The point at which the canoe balances (unless it is a wildly asymmetric hull shape) is where you want to put the leading edge of the seat to get good fore-and-aft trim. If anything, you want to err a bit to the aft so that the attitude would be slightly bow-high.

    Have you filled with epoxy at the edge of the glass strips for the stems? You want to try to bury that edge to avoid sanding it too much - it will reduce the clarity and show the strips.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  35. #140
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Concord, Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,140

    Default Re: Nymph Canoe Build

    I'm not really building from his plans, only the WoodenBoat article and table of offsets, and I stretched that canoe to 12 ft. There is a distance for the thwart backrest, but I'm not planning to install one of those. I'm installing a couple of quarter thwarts and using a padded backrest.

    Just aft of center makes sense. Come to think of it, a sliding seat would be the cat's meow, no? Then you could vary the trim and even turn around in the seat since the canoe is symmetrical. A google search shows some neat sliding arrangements.

    I guess I will keep it simple at this point.

    The glass at the stems needs another coat or two.

    Thanks,

    Fitz.
    Last edited by Fitz; 04-20-2011 at 08:21 PM.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

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