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Thread: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

  1. #71
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Loving the pictures and commentary. Brings me back to my kayak trip.... fond memories and quirky encounters.

    Dan

  2. #72
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    RE: Sailing to windward. I have found my 17í Whitehall to be very sensitive to weight distribution when trying to beat into a chop in heavy winds, especially when I sail single-handed. Adding ballast forward to counteract my weight aft is vital if I am going to make any progress upwind at all. The problem is that the forefoot has to be kept immersed; otherwise it looses grip and the bow gets knocked off and blown to leeward, stalling the boat. It just looses drive.

    I regard the approximate centre of flotation of the hull to be somewhere near the middle of the boat and ballast accordingly. All my heavy gear and supplies go forward when cruising. For day sailing, I carry the equivalent of my weight in ballast up forward to trim the hull. I also like to use a hiking stick on the tiller so that I can get my weight as far up toward the centre of the hull and outboard as possible.


    The following photo of Darrochís Alaska illustrates what I mean. (I hope you donít mind me using this photo D). As you can see, she is quite a bit up in the bow with the weight of the outboard motor and the helmsman aft. This will definitely affect performance hard on the wind. In light airs it doesnít seem to matter that much, but I would still try to trim down by the bow. I would even go so far as to say over trim. A bit of extra ballast forward will do no great harm when sailing. But, of course, there is plenty of room for experimentation to get it right.

    This is a great thread Tom. Iím enjoying the tales of your voyage very much and you present a compelling case for cruising in small, light boats that can be dragged up on shore easily. I sure hope your Alaska will measure up. Yikes!


  3. #73
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Don, do you offer that boat as yawl, too? Versus the ketch configuration in the photo above? Seems like he'd have a better chance at balancing the boat if that mizzen wasn't in the way of him moving forward.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Don Kurylko said (he said, having failed to get the quote thingy working), "This is a great thread Tom. I’m enjoying the tales of your voyage very much and you present a compelling case for cruising in small, light boats that can be dragged up on shore easily. I sure hope your Alaska will measure up. Yikes!"

    Don,

    thanks for the kind words, and for that photo; I hadn't seen an Alaska under sail from that angle, and it is a BEAUTY! Can't wait to get mine on the water. Trying to figure out what color to paint it so if I ever finish fairing the hull I can paint right away when it warms up again.

    I won't have a motor on the transom so that should help with trim. And maybe this will help me convince my wife that we need a large slobbery dog to serve as a bow hound--an Irish Wolfhound? Tether him to the front mast step and there's 100 pounds or more. (Although, judging from Gary Lundgren's photos on your site, dogs seem to prefer the elegant sternsheet seating).

    As for "measuring up" to my present boat--not even in the same class. If I were a quicker builder you'd be looking at photos of my Alaska in the North Channel, you can be sure of that. Even if it's too heavy to haul up everywhere I dragged my Pirate Racer, there are plenty of ways around that.

    As for the ketch/yawl debate, Yeadon and McMullen have good arguments in favor of the yawl. Here's my attempt to argue for the ketch.

    1. It looks cool--better than a yawl, to me. (Yes, this is probably the kind of argument that gets discarded when Practicality raises its ugly head, but still...)

    2. No need for a boomkin; one less spar to build and have poking around behind your boat.

    3. "Ketch" conjures images of the South Seas; "yawl" makes me think of NASCAR.

    4. From what Darroch and Alex say, it seems like if the wind is blowing at all you might not have both masts stepped anyway. (which may be making the yawl argument for them, because then you'd have to unstep the center mast to row, wouldn't you?)

    5. The larger mizzed is a significant driving sail and allows a bigger sail area kept lower--important for such a narrow boat. (Not sure I'm right about this--what do you think?)

    6. That mizzen is only in the way if you're not too lazy to move.

    Later,

    Tom
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  5. #75
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Tom, one of these evenings you'll get a knock at the door. It'll be McMullen and me.

    "Hello Tom, we're here to speak with you about your relationship with your Mizzen. May we come inside?"


    (Note: I'm the sexy one.)
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Don, do you offer that boat as yawl, too? Versus the ketch configuration in the photo above? Seems like he'd have a better chance at balancing the boat if that mizzen wasn't in the way of him moving forward.
    I don't find the mizzen in the way of moving forward; in fact, I have a long hiking stick that allows me to sit just forward of it if I want, which I have tried under various conditions. I have found no appreciable difference doing so.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    I don't find the mizzen in the way of moving forward; in fact, I have a long hiking stick that allows me to sit just forward of it if I want, which I have tried under various conditions. I have found no appreciable difference doing so.
    When are we all going to meet up for a campcruise? It would be fun to trade boats for an afternoon and dip rails.

    I know a good recipe for campfire-baked salmon.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    When are we all going to meet up for a campcruise? It would be fun to trade boats for an afternoon and dip rails.
    I'd never get my boat back from you guys - you don't know what you're missing with those little girly-mizzens...

  9. #79
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Aw, just kiddin', man. I'd love to get together but, as I explained to the Admiral, I think I'm still persona non grata down there so you'll have to come up here. For you I'd leave the engine at home...but not buddy
    Last edited by darroch; 11-10-2010 at 05:15 PM.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Don Kurylko said (he said, having failed to get the quote thingy working), "This is a great thread Tom. Iím enjoying the tales of your voyage very much and you present a compelling case for cruising in small, light boats that can be dragged up on shore easily. I sure hope your Alaska will measure up. Yikes!"

    Don,

    thanks for the kind words, and for that photo; I hadn't seen an Alaska under sail from that angle, and it is a BEAUTY! Can't wait to get mine on the water. Trying to figure out what color to paint it so if I ever finish fairing the hull I can paint right away when it warms up again.

    I won't have a motor on the transom so that should help with trim. And maybe this will help me convince my wife that we need a large slobbery dog to serve as a bow hound--an Irish Wolfhound? Tether him to the front mast step and there's 100 pounds or more. (Although, judging from Gary Lundgren's photos on your site, dogs seem to prefer the elegant sternsheet seating).

    As for "measuring up" to my present boat--not even in the same class. If I were a quicker builder you'd be looking at photos of my Alaska in the North Channel, you can be sure of that. Even if it's too heavy to haul up everywhere I dragged my Pirate Racer, there are plenty of ways around that.

    As for the ketch/yawl debate, Yeadon and McMullen have good arguments in favor of the yawl. Here's my attempt to argue for the ketch.

    1. It looks cool--better than a yawl, to me. (Yes, this is probably the kind of argument that gets discarded when Practicality raises its ugly head, but still...)

    2. No need for a boomkin; one less spar to build and have poking around behind your boat.

    3. "Ketch" conjures images of the South Seas; "yawl" makes me think of NASCAR.

    4. From what Darroch and Alex say, it seems like if the wind is blowing at all you might not have both masts stepped anyway. (which may be making the yawl argument for them, because then you'd have to unstep the center mast to row, wouldn't you?)

    5. The larger mizzed is a significant driving sail and allows a bigger sail area kept lower--important for such a narrow boat. (Not sure I'm right about this--what do you think?)

    6. That mizzen is only in the way if you're not too lazy to move.

    Later,

    Tom
    Yup, Don's rig is pretty. So is that shallop rig that Roger Long drew for his yawldory, though on both rigs I have questions. I'd love to see Darroch's opinions on that thread.

    Something else to consider ...

    Just for fodder ... Big Food is a yawl, but has no boomkin. I can sheet the sprit-boom straight down to the rudder head. That's one reason I went with that particular sail, versus a leg-o-mutton or a sprit.

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    Aw, just kiddin', man. I'd love to get together but, as I explained to the Admiral, I think I'm still persona non grata down there so you'll have to come up here. For you I'd leave the engine at home...but not the bud
    First off, that's a wonderful offer and you're on.

    So, we have to cross the border huh? I guess we could do that. But is there a place on your side that is closer to the border where we could do a daysail?
    Last edited by Yeadon; 11-10-2010 at 04:22 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Well, I'd prefer to be well away from the border...and you'll prolly have to help me tie the Admiral to a tree...no tellin' what could happen with that boy.
    Last edited by darroch; 11-10-2010 at 04:39 PM.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Don, do you offer that boat as yawl, too? Versus the ketch configuration in the photo above? Seems like he'd have a better chance at balancing the boat if that mizzen wasn't in the way of him moving forward.
    No yawl rig on offer Tim. On long, narrow boats like this I prefer the shallop rig. It is much more versatile, arguably. I think a yawl is better suited to beamier, sailing type hulls.

    Alaskaís go to windward fairly well. Itís just when a steep chop kicks up that they loose drive. Even if the mizzen is out of the way, some ballast is needed forward to help power through. In high winds and flat water (it does happen occassionaly) they do just fine. I think a hiking plank or a trapeze would help them stand up to more canvass and provide greater drive. But that kind of defeats the whole purpose of a beach cruiser.

    Cracked off a bit, there are no issues; these boats go. Here the narrow hull pays off in spades. But then, thatís what makes them decent pulling boats anyway. And, they are after all, primarily pulling boats. Iím happy if I can tack through 110 degrees in really heavy going. In winds above 20 knots, I usually avoid beating altogether. Not that I donít enjoy it, but when cruising, I really donít need to. I just wait for conditions to moderate. Thatís what dry and cozy boom tents are for.

    Thumbs up to cruising without a motor Tom! I believe more people get into trouble with them than without. They are convenient and provide some peace of mind if things go sideways, but they also lull us into taking chances in unfavourable circumstances that could lead to a whole lot of trouble. They are no substitute for seamanship.

    With a mast stepped in the centre postion, you can still row from the middle thwart Ė no problem. The mizzen can be a bit of a pain, I guess, but it is of a useful size and makes a great heavy weather sail stepped forward in the centre position. It offers a better proportioned shape than a deep reefed larger one and is probably a lot easier to handle as well.

    I also like the idea mentioned on another thread of setting a small ďtrysailĒ in a hard chance. This could be done on the mizzen mast stepped forward and would offer a nice snug rig to lie-to or run down wind.

    Incidentally, I have laid a-hull quite happily in my Whitehall with no sail set at all in 35 knots of wind and 6 foot seas (confirmed) with just the tiller hooked down to leeward. I was even able to move around and tie in reefs with little concern. A small mizzen stepped aft, as in a yawl configuration, works very well, but this was just fine too.

    I really like the idea of using a dog as ballast up forward! How about a big Newfie? You wouldnít need oars then either. Just chuck the dog in the water tied to the painter and dangle a nice juicy bone in front of him off the end of the sprit boom, pointed in the direction you need to go. Come to think of it, you wouldnít need a PFD either!

  13. #83
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Darroch, I think we are looking at an English Bay adventure at the very least, if not a full-on Gulf Islands expedition in the future. Do you wanna do the crossing, or would you like to meet us in the Gulfs as we work our way north from the San Juans?

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    With a mast stepped in the centre postion, you can still row from the middle thwart – no problem.
    Duh... I've only been building this boat for 2 years, not like I should know that or anything. You're right, of course.

    As for this:

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    Cracked off a bit, there are no issues; these boats go. Here the narrow hull pays off in spades.


    I have since discovered just how correct Don is about that:



    The Alaska is a great design!

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 05-19-2018 at 02:38 AM.
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    So, what size are the mainsails on Rowan and Big Food? You guys make a good case for yawl advantages, but is a smaller mainsail a possible benefit of having a larger mizzen? On the Alaska the main is 85 sq ft.

    Is that much smaller than your sails? If so, do you think that'd be an advantage in any way? Or do I have to wait for my answer until you show up on my doorstep with cheap, poorly edited tracts about yawlish joys?

    Tom
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Darroch, I think we are looking at an English Bay adventure at the very least, if not a full-on Gulf Islands expedition in the future. Do you wanna do the crossing, or would you like to meet us in the Gulfs as we work our way north from the San Juans?
    Interestingly, all this talk of the Inside Passage [read HUGE COMMITMENT] has made me wonder why the San Juans and Gulf Islands, Desolation Sound, the Broughtons, the Broken Group and many others haven't been touted on this forum. I picture Venchka coming up for a leg or two, meeting up with JimD on the way down...a whole flotilla of little bloody boats with little bloody old men...men with oars...what a sight!

    I've been thinking of where around here a bunch of trailers could be left for a period of time. It's not a bad jumping-off point if you guys wanted to start out from here. I think a trip from Vancouver to Desolation Sound would be amazing. You wouldn't have to deal with Yuculta and Dent either.

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Big Food's main is 87 square feet, the mizzen is 10 square feet.
    My mizzen could be a couple feet bigger, I think, but it's not bad.

    I'm not sure what Rowan's ratio is .. around 100 on the main and 20 on the mizzen?

    Here's a few thoughts on sail sizes/design in regards to ketches and yawl.

    On a ketch, the mizzen is used for both forward drive and steering balance, both via its size and its location further forward - allowing you to share the load a bit and have smaller sails all around. I tend to think of these as using big boat tactics ... striking whole sails, then shortening sail.

    On a yawl, the mizzen is primarily a steering sail. All your forward drive is coming from the main, and very very very little comes from the mizzen, though you do get a touch of drive there. I think the ratio of on a yawl of the main/mizzen is greater than that of a ketch. This allows you to put that sail all the way aft in your boat - as its small size really doesn't do a ton to mess up your overall CE/CLR lead. On the yawl, you reef by shortening sail. Tighten up the mizzen, weathercock, drop the main, tie in a reef, keep sailing.

    One thought about designing a main for a yawl ... you're really aiming the size of the main toward your lighter air days, and that allows you to overcanvas the boat a bit - especially since it's so easy to reef when necessary.

    (We would prefer to fully explain this in person, of course. And we have some material to leave behind.)

    May Yawl have mercy on your souls.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    'May Yawlweh have mercy on your souls."

    Fixed it for ya.

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    "Or do I have to wait for my answer until you show up on my doorstep with cheap, poorly edited tracts about yawlish joys?"

    Tom - don't pay attention to those yawlish boys. If I ever figure out how, I'll post a vid that'll show 'em what a man-sized mizzen can do...

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar


    Redezvous at Sydney Spit Marine Park? I havenít been there in ages, but it could be a great spot for a gathering of the tribe. Itís a bit of a slog from Anacortes, but you might be able to get one of the local Forumites with a motor boat to tow a string of you up for the occasion, if time is an issue. This might also entice some of the Van Islanderís and B.C. mainlanderís to dust off their oars and sails and come out for some fun. Whaddaya think?

    Wow, what a hijack of your thread Tom!

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    "Or do I have to wait for my answer until you show up on my doorstep with cheap, poorly edited tracts about yawlish joys?"

    Tom - don't pay attention to those yawlish boys. If I ever figure out how, I'll post a vid that'll show 'em what a man-sized mizzen can do...
    Please do; I actually replied to your "how to post videos" thread explaining one method that works--if you have your videos on Youtube, anyway.

    Tom
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post

    Redezvous at Sydney Spit Marine Park? I haven’t been there in ages, but it could be a great spot for a gathering of the tribe. It’s a bit of a slog from Anacortes, but you might be able to get one of the local Forumites with a motor boat to tow a string of you up for the occasion, if time is an issue. This might also entice some of the Van Islander’s and B.C. mainlander’s to dust off their oars and sails and come out for some fun. Whaddaya think?

    Wow, what a hijack of your thread Tom!
    Yes, I noticed my clever plan (show them lots of great pictures of the North Channel, and those west coast guys will drag their boats to Lake Huron and I'll have people to sail with) doesn't seem to be working.

    That's ok, though; your hijack might backfire on you--I might just show up out there some day.

    Tom
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    Redezvous at Sydney Spit Marine Park? I havenít been there in ages, but it could be a great spot for a gathering of the tribe. Itís a bit of a slog from Anacortes, but you might be able to get one of the local Forumites with a motor boat to tow a string of you up for the occasion, if time is an issue. This might also entice some of the Van Islanderís and B.C. mainlanderís to dust off their oars and sails and come out for some fun. Whaddaya think?
    Sidney Spit is only a couple of miles from the very good public boat launch in Sidney, which has parking for cars and trailers. The Spit is also a good starting point for a few days cruise in the Gulf Islands, which is essentially what I did this year, except that I started a little more south. Easy to sail north for 3 days then back south for 3, all in relatively protected waters.
    Alex

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Jackson View Post
    For next year, I plan to make a storm sail, which I can keep rolled up on a short boom under the thwarts and haul out when necessary. The strategy will be to douse the lugsail and hoist the storm sail on the same mast, with the same halyard. For openers, this will get me down to a single sheet on the mainsail—much easier for solo sailing. Also, not having the long spar aloft will greatly simplify jibes.
    Tom,

    will that be a triangular storm sail, or a mini-lugsail, or something else? How many sq ft of sail are you thinking?

    Tom
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    . . . you might be able to get one of the local Forumites with a motor boat to tow a string of you up for the occasion. . .

    Are you being deliberatively provocative there Don? Good grief! If we can't get there by sail & oar alone then we ain't coming! Oh yeah, and we'll be there all right! The gauntlet has been thrown! Sydney Spit it is, but ain't no motorboater sissies invited to this party. I'll be launching from Anacortes and meeting you there.

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    I'll be launching from Anacortes and meeting you there.
    Pfft. A real tough-guy would launch from Lake Union. Or Kingston.

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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    I guess I better finish the story of my summer travels. I rounded Drummond Island to the south--a few houses here and there, but still plenty of deserted shoreline to camp on (if you've already cleared Customs, of course).

    My last day, I finally reached the SW tip of Drummond Island, which marks the start of DeTour Passage. This is one of the busiest shipping channels in all of the Great Lakes, and I did see plenty of 1,000' oar boats go through, but there was plenty of room to avoid them:



    Just as I tacked around the tip of Drummond that evening, the wind picked up and kept right on picking. I was only a couple of miles from my car, but I had to sail back east to Drummond Island Yacht Haven in the center of the north shore to clear Customs. (Which closes at 9:00 p.m.). I was on my fastest scariest run yet (for some reason I persuaded myself I could do it unreefed and paid for that foolishness with a couple of hours of terror). I had to circle around a bit to avoid the Drummond Island ferry, then kept going north up the west shore of Drummond. There were a couple of big 'glass sloops behind me under jib alone, and we outran them. Wowsers!

    Then I rounded the corner of Drummon Island into Potagannising Bay and we were still on a perfect run (but calmer now), with 7-ish miles or so to go:



    Arrived at Drummond Island Yacht Haven in 15 knots, zipped through the narrow entrance channel and between the docked boats inside with a couple of feet to spare, and ran 'er right up onto the boat ramp. Went (dutifully) to report arrival to Customs. Which was closed.
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    So this might be the last of my North Channel reports for this summer's trip: the Aftermath.

    Customs? Closed by the time I got there. (It was 9:30, after all, and they close at 9:00). The sign on their office door said they'd be back at 12:00 noon the next day, and listed a number to call for further instructions. The marina pay phone? Out of order. The cell phone I borrowed from a friendly power boater (who fed me, too, by the way)? No service. So I rowed my boat around to a beach just outside the marina and set up my tent in the shadows of the marina playground.

    Then I got to thinking. The forecast for the next day was westerly winds at 20-25 knots. My car was about 9-10 miles away, to the west (of course). Rather than bashing his brains out beating all day, a clever sailor might arrange to hitch a ride to the west side of the island, ride the ferry over, get his car and trailer, and return for his boat.

    Now, I heard what one guy did when Customs weren't available and he didn't feel like waiting around for them till noon: he befriended a local guide unloading rental kayaks at 7:00 a.m. at the beach just a few steps from his tent, got the guide to drive him to the ferry, brought his car and trailer back, ate a leisurely breakfast at a restaraunt (he probably had a gyro omelet or something equally yummy), and then returned to the marina just in time to meet with the Customs officers in their gray uniforms and crew cuts and guns and no-exceptions military-minded outlook on things.

    Who were probably all mad at this guy because he hadn't stayed aboard his tiny boat for 15 hours straight (and who would have been even madder if they'd heard about him fetching his car and eating his omelet and generally spreading the "contamination" further and further inland). They probably spent three hours holding onto this guy's passport and threatening to impound his little boat and running background checks on him and checking his fingerprints and telling him how he could be fined $10,000 for doing such a dastardly and un-American thing as NOT staying aboard his boat.

    But that wasn't me. I didn't have any problems with Customs.

    Later,

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 09-09-2016 at 11:38 AM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  29. #99
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Double !!!!! You crack me up Tom! See you at Sydney Spit sometime this coming summer then?

  31. #101
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    Dec 2000
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Are you being deliberatively provocative there Don? Good grief! If we can't get there by sail & oar alone then we ain't coming! Oh yeah, and we'll be there all right! The gauntlet has been thrown! Sydney Spit it is, but ain't no motorboater sissies invited to this party. I'll be launching from Anacortes and meeting you there.
    Dang! And here I was thinking I was being all inclusive and opening the door to some of our more socially deprived bretheren condemned to experiencing the world go passing by through tempered glass pilot house windows with nary a soul to share it with. Boy, how wrong was I! You're a cruel mofo you are Admiral...

  32. #102
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
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    8,079

    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Great story, Tom. You're my freshwater campcruising hero.

    Don, set the date. I'll take time off for a sydney spit and back trip. No doubts.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  33. #103
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    Jan 2009
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    I'm supposed to be grading papers right now...

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  34. #104
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Something else to consider ...

    Just for fodder ... Big Food is a yawl, but has no boomkin. I can sheet the sprit-boom straight down to the rudder head. That's one reason I went with that particular sail, versus a leg-o-mutton or a sprit.
    True enough, but on my Alaska that would put the mizzen right in the middle of that nice sternsheet seating. And then where would my dog sit? (Don's website is pretty particular about that; the dog gets the nice back seat so he can use the gunwale as a chin rest, apparently.)

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 11-10-2010 at 10:56 PM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
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    Default Re: The North Channel by Sail and Oar

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kurylko View Post
    Double !!!!! You crack me up Tom! See you at Sydney Spit sometime this coming summer then?
    Count me in for 2012. But only if--as is permitted under Rules McMullen--someone offers me one of them fancy private social agreements to shepherd me around a bit and introduce me to tides and rips and 6,000-mile fetches and all that. Not to mention the geoducks...

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

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