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Thread: Cruising Rowboat

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris94703 View Post
    Is there a relatively fast cruising rowboat plan I can modify to build a cabin with shoulder width of 38” that a couple could sleep close to each other? Something like an Angus Row Cruiser which will accommodate hatch and cabin under deck for two and strong enough transom to mount an electrical outboard (for emergencies) which can be stored under the front storage deck?

    Seems like a slightly modified, with bit wider cabin and another half foot of length, Angus Rowcruiser as an Angus Tandem Rowcruiser can be adopted for their plans? Being a neophyte boat builder I do not know fully what I ask.
    If you want a boat suitable for row/sail/power, and for use on lakes or rivers and NOT offshore, i might be able to dig something out for you, there seems to be an interest in something like this, i was working something up that might work both in ply S+G, and skin-on-frame. You do realise sleeping 2 is going to be cosy?

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    http://www.clcboats.com/shop/boats/w...g-cruiser.html

    I'm guessing that if you simplify the build and ditch the sail rig and centerboard and some other extraneous bits (and use 6mm ply in place of some of the 9mm) you could knock the weight way down and have something like what you are looking for. My understanding (not sure where I heard this) is that the guy who runs CLC will tweak designs in some cases to accommodate different needs and uses.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    If you want a boat suitable for row/sail/power, and for use on lakes or rivers and NOT offshore, i might be able to dig something out for you, there seems to be an interest in something like this, i was working something up that might work both in ply S+G, and skin-on-frame. You do realise sleeping 2 is going to be cosy?
    Cozy with my wifes fine. I see most of the use in bays and coastal waters near shore. Any boat I am forced to use a trailer must have a cabin to sleep two, but if I can figure out a way to safely load on to my pickup shell roof racks, 7 high, that has a 160# load max, Id prefer to cartop that boat.

    I have no knowledge of skin-on-frames, although that sounds risky.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallman View Post
    http://www.clcboats.com/shop/boats/w...g-cruiser.html

    I'm guessing that if you simplify the build and ditch the sail rig and centerboard and some other extraneous bits (and use 6mm ply in place of some of the 9mm) you could knock the weight way down and have something like what you are looking for. My understanding (not sure where I heard this) is that the guy who runs CLC will tweak designs in some cases to accommodate different needs and uses.
    That Faering Cruiser seems heavy to row all day. The Angus Rowboats in a tandem modification seems like rowing would be faster and more nimble to explore with.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris94703 View Post
    Cozy with my wifes fine. I see most of the use in bays and coastal waters near shore. Any boat I am forced to use a trailer must have a cabin to sleep two, but if I can figure out a way to safely load on to my pickup shell roof racks, 7 High, that has a 160# load max, Id prefer to cartop that boat.

    I have no knowledge of skin-on-frames, although that sounds risky.
    Skin on frame sounds like a good idea for this to me. Build one fuselage frame style. Go together same as a big kayak. Get the size you want and the weight you want.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris94703 View Post
    Cozy with my wife’s fine. I see most of the use in bays and coastal waters near shore. Any boat I am forced to use a trailer must have a cabin to sleep two, but if I can figure out a way to safely load on to my pickup shell roof racks, 7’ high, that has a 160# load max, I’d prefer to cartop that boat.

    I have no knowledge of skin-on-frames, although that sounds risky.
    Im still hunting out the other boats details. Just for size, i modified a DK18 to acommodate a small cuddy forward. It sails and motors. I did mess with the bottom so it would plane with low HP, but the original boats bottom swept up aft, it would have less drag rowing. At 18ft, you wont get 2 tandem sliding seats in this cockpit, and have a seperate cuddy. Just throwing an idea out, probably too much windage for pure rowing, but has been working well under sail and motor.



    I think you will struggle to get what you want if you want to car top it, outside of ultra light ply or skin on frame.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    Im still hunting out the other boats details. Just for size, i modified a DK18 to acommodate a small cuddy forward. It sails and motors. I did mess with the bottom so it would plane with low HP, but the original boats bottom swept up aft, it would have less drag rowing. At 18ft, you wont get 2 tandem sliding seats in this cockpit, and have a seperate cuddy. Just throwing an idea out, probably too much windage for pure rowing, but has been working well under sail and motor.



    I think you will struggle to get what you want if you want to car top it, outside of ultra light ply or skin on frame.
    That’s a cool boat.

    I’m willing to trailer haul a relatively “fast” row cruiser that can sleep two in cabin, with one sliding seat or two fixed rowing seats. Seems like 19.5’ with enough beam to have 38” wide cabin and a reinforced wineglass transom for outboard, that can be later be retrofitted with sail and pair of outriggers, would be a boat I am eager to build.

    Meanwhile, i’ll buy a tandem sculling used wherry for fitness rowing day trips.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    You "might" just squeeze a Currach as a roof-topper



    They fly downwind under sail and outboard no problem. Very versatile design.....built on a beach usually....

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    This boat was mentioned early in the thread, Welsford's Walkabout stretched and modified for slide seat.



    Having a hard cuddy for two AND cockpit for two slide seat rowers would make a very big rowboat. I think much better to use a tent, then the rowing space turns into sleeping cabin at night.

    There are 3 rowing stations, it works as single slide seat, double slide, and single slide with passenger. I hardly ever row double slide, it does not add much speed.

    The boat is not car toppable, probably 250 to 300 lbs and has a trailer.

    Not sure what you mean by fast, I have raced this boat in the Opean Ocean Regatta and some South End regattas. Have never won a race, but never come in last.

    I made a roll-out platform for two, but I think even this 17'8" x 5' beam is pretty cramped for two to sleep, along with camping and cooking gear for any length of trip. This is best as a solo camp cruiser.



    This boat is just up the road from you, in Fairfield. PM me if you want to take a look at it sometime for ideas.

    Rick

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    @Yeadon - here are some pictures of North east Cobles kitted out with their winter canvas fore deck shelters. They generally only use them during the winter and are a simple A frame with ridge pole. Nothing terribly elaborate and "in the old days" they would use the mast as the ridge pole and row the boats as needed. One picture of a coble without the shelter to give you an idea of what the shelter protects.

    douglasdale_2.jpg1194_Craster_Eleanor_Dawson_w750.jpg75-3_Newbiggin_03_w750.jpg0928_Clan_Gillean_w750.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Seems to be an issue with Google and Picasa. I cant move over any pictures. My patience level with google isnt great, more so now they have decided to take a political stand. It might well be the pictures have a Russian URL. Thank Google for limiting your options.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat



    Boat im trying post is kinda similar ti Lili, but lili is 6.1m and the boat details i have is one of 4.8m x 1.25 rather than 2m of Lili. If you want a double "cuddly", the hull shape is already compromised into a "cruising" rowboat. Lili weighs in around 320kg, the design at 4.8 is around 100kg, and made up from 3mm ply on stringers to a round hull section, originally designed for a crew of 3, one can sleep in the cockpit. I have tried taking a photo of it on screen, but the resolution kills the picture.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    I also second the vote for the Angus rowcruiser.

    https://angusrowboats.com/pages/rowcruiser

    The only downside being that it's 19 feet long, which is too much for your driveway, I think.
    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    I also second the vote for the Angus rowcruiser.

    https://angusrowboats.com/pages/rowcruiser

    The only downside being that it's 19 feet long, which is too much for your driveway, I think.
    my drive way can fit four cars, but only the first car from street side can have quick access. I use the garage as a gym.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    I also second the vote for the Angus rowcruiser.

    https://angusrowboats.com/pages/rowcruiser

    The only downside being that it's 19 feet long, which is too much for your driveway, I think.
    Looks like anything with a cabin will require a trailer. A CLC Faering Cruiser might work, but that appears that be more of a sailor than a rower.
    Last edited by Chris94703; 11-24-2017 at 04:49 AM.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    I think you may find the Angus boat too tippy to allow clambering aft to mount or raise/lower any sort of outboard, be it electric or gasoline powered. You might want to squeeze in a well. An outboard requires more width than a trolling motor, so it looks like you'll want the Minn Kota, and it looks like there may be just enough room between your feet just forward of the aft bulkhead. My Minn Kota Riptide (salt water model) slides up and down rather than tilting, which allows for a much shorter well, besides being narrower.

    This boat, at 21 feet by 52 inches,
    019.jpg
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 11-24-2017 at 01:52 AM.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Sorry, can't seem to load more than one photo per reply. Oh yeah, figured it out.
    031.jpg
    It has a well designed to accommodate both a trolling motor and a pedal unit. The pedal unit has to tilt, so the well is much longer than you would need for just a trolling motor.
    015.jpg
    029.jpg

    It cruises at 3.5 MPH, no sweat, sprints at perhaps 5 MPH and the bare hull came in at 199 pounds. I built it heavier than it needs to be, I like the carry between strokes, but it could be built sufficiently strong at 150 pounds or so. It would be easy to do a fabric cabin, much lighter than a wooden one, easily enough. I've had it out in some really bad stuff and never shipped a drop or felt threatened. Trouble is you're not an accomplished builder and it was derived from an 18 footer, no plans, so it's probably not the right boat for you. At 21 feet it catches too much wind anyway.

    Still, you can use the well idea to your advantage.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Sorry, can't seem to load more than one photo per reply. Oh yeah, figured it out.
    031.jpg
    It has a well designed to accommodate both a trolling motor and a pedal unit. The pedal unit has to tilt, so the well is much longer than you would need for just a trolling motor.
    015.jpg
    029.jpg

    It cruises at 3.5 MPH, no sweat, sprints at perhaps 5 MPH and the bare hull came in at 199 pounds. I built it heavier than it needs to be, I like the carry between strokes, but it could be built sufficiently strong at 150 pounds or so. It would be easy to do a fabric cabin, much lighter than a wooden one, easily enough. I've had it out in some really bad stuff and never shipped a drop or felt threatened. Trouble is you're not an accomplished builder and it was derived from an 18 footer, no plans, so it's probably not the right boat for you. At 21 feet it catches too much wind anyway.

    Still, you can use the well idea to your advantage.
    Thanks for the ideals and photos.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    This blog brings an interesting perspective on the cruising rowboat:

    http://vinegar-stroke.blogspot.co.uk/


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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    First off, I am NOT a "cruising rower". Nor am I any sort of long distance rower. The most I've ever rowed is about 4-5 miles, which took about an hour and a half. With that in mind, I'll say this...

    The requirement for being able to sleep on the boat and sit up in the sleep space *seriously* changes the boats parameters and limits your options in terms of commonly available designs. Sleep in the boat, in a dedicated sleeping space...OK. Sleep in the boat, in a tent sort of structure, OK. Dedicated cabin, with sit-up headroom AND still have good rowing performance? That's tough.

    Honestly, you might be looking at a custom design, IMHO.

    BTW, the only guy I know who does stuff much like what you outline in your original post is rgthorn and his Walkabout. I've seen that boat in person and it is a pretty slick solution to a use-brief much like yours.

    There's also, apparently qan adaption of the Merry Wherry called the "Expedition", but no sitting headroom, here.

    http://www.merrywherry.com/merryexpedition.html

    Whilst looking at the Merry Expedition, I did come across this photograph on the "Rowing for Pleasure" blog, but I have no clue what it is. It seems like what you have in mind.

    Last edited by Alan H; 11-27-2017 at 02:18 PM.
    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    First off, I am NOT a "cruising rower". Nor am I any sort of long distance rower. The most I've ever rowed is about 4-5 miles, which took about an hour and a half. With that in mind, I'll say this...

    The requirement for being able to sleep on the boat and sit up in the sleep space *seriously* changes the boats parameters and limits your options in terms of commonly available designs. Sleep in the boat, in a dedicated sleeping space...OK. Sleep in the boat, in a tent sort of structure, OK. Dedicated cabin, with sit-up headroom AND still have good rowing performance? That's tough.

    Honestly, you might be looking at a custom design, IMHO.

    BTW, the only guy I know who does stuff much like what you outline in your original post is rgthorn and his Walkabout. I've seen that boat in person and it is a pretty slick solution to a use-brief much like yours.

    There's also, apparently qan adaption of the Merry Wherry called the "Expedition", but no sitting headroom, here.

    http://www.merrywherry.com/merryexpedition.html

    Whilst looking at the Merry Expedition, I did come across this photograph on the "Rowing for Pleasure" blog, but I have no clue what it is. It seems like what you have in mind.


    Ah, we do not need to sit up. Two of us want be able to slide in the cabin and sleep tight. Otherwise, mobility and rowing speed, thus minimal exposure to wind resistance, we would value more.

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    I'm gonna say again that a tent may be the best solution. Dedicated rowing space for two AND dedicated cabin for two makes a big rowboat with a lot more weight and drag. If you want any kind of space in the cabin other than the minimal "coffin cabin" it will be more windage, as in the Expedition above.

  23. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    I'm gonna say again that a tent may be the best solution. Dedicated rowing space for two AND dedicated cabin for two makes a big rowboat with a lot more weight and drag. If you want any kind of space in the cabin other than the minimal "coffin cabin" it will be more windage, as in the Expedition above.
    dedicated sliding seat rowing for one; “coffin” cabin for two, a married couple.

    When there’s a 3rd crew that man can sleep in the cockpit under the tarp tent. I’d rather have comforting rowing speed rather than comfortable cabin that’ll drag with wind.

    Thanks to all the helpful comments, I realize I want to buy a car-top able, under 100#, sail oar wherry or dory then
    build a trailer hauled sail oar rowcruiser.

    A custom build with two fixed rowing seats or one sliding seat sail oar cruiser plan with a small (38” wide) and low sleeping-only cabin and a smaller storage cabin would be worth building from scratch.
    Last edited by Chris94703; 11-27-2017 at 06:05 PM.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris94703 View Post
    Ah, we do not need to sit up. Two of us want be able to slide in the cabin and sleep tight. Otherwise, mobility and rowing speed, thus minimal exposure to wind resistance, we would value more.
    I'm confused. The OP said "36 inches of headroom" or something to that effect. It also said "cuddy" rather than "fully enclosed cabin" which somehow I conveniently forgot..my bad. Am I missing something?
    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Ah never mind...looks like you've come to the conclusion that what you really want is two completely different boats, which makes perfect sense.
    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    I'm confused. The OP said "36 inches of headroom" or something to that effect. It also said "cuddy" rather than "fully enclosed cabin" which somehow I conveniently forgot..my bad. Am I missing something?

    Yes, I see that the OP indeed said that. I’ve “hijacked” this thread into my own thread of more minimalist yet speedier wants. I can see now that is confusing and not necessarily welcomed.

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris94703 View Post
    Yes, I see that the OP indeed said that. I’ve “hijacked” this thread into my own thread of more minimalist yet speedier wants. I can see now that is confusing and not necessarily welcomed.
    Speaking as the OP I really don't mind the thread being used for any discussion of cruising rowboats - or sail and oar boats where the balance is more oar than sail. I really started the thread to investigate shelter options on such boats.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Clarkey View Post
    Speaking as the OP I really don't mind the thread being used for any discussion of cruising rowboats - or sail and oar boats where the balance is more oar than sail. I really started the thread to investigate shelter options on such boats.
    Cool.

    Rowing most of the day taking turns, kind of like hiking, but on the coasts.
    Utilizing sail to splash waves, wind gusting.
    Fishing, swimming, or reading while at anchor.
    Fry up rock fish and zucchini.
    Slide into the cramped cabin and be woken up with the rain splashing the deck, warm and dry.
    Wondering what calamities or mayhem we may have to dodge or survive.

    Seems enticing for two or three backpackers expanding on ways to explore or chill.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Ok, 2 last examples from me that would be open to a custom cuddy being added forward. Someone already mentioned that 2 people rowing is not that much more efficient than one, so i would go for one sliding seat option, with the crew having a rotation period based on their own needs, i think that a boat rowed like that would cover more distance in a day than 2 rowing at the same time. I have plans for the fly fishing coble, it was designed for rowing, sail and outboard, so it is a compromise hull, i built the DK18 instead as there was less seams to goo.



    Has the advantage of an already high stem that allows to blend in a cuddy without looking too high. It has a fine waterline entry, but this might be awkward when having to allow for 2 pairs of feet, you might need to lift the sole higher, which has obvious knock on effects. (if you have reasonable small feet, may not be an issue).

    The other with a more full bow is Pauls Port Sorrel, its a really sweet looking boat, i think.



    http://www.selway-fisher.com/Rowskiffs.htm#SORE

    An excellent load carrier, good description in the link.



    Off-duty crew can sit aft with a roped tiller, which gives both crew something to focus on, i hate having to break a good rowing stride to look over my shoulder to see if its anything coming and how my course is doing. One decent set of blades and sliding seat is probably half the price of two!

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    This Chesapeake Light Craft design seems to fill the bill.

    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris94703 View Post
    Cool.

    Rowing most of the day taking turns, kind of like hiking, but on the coasts.
    Utilizing sail to splash waves, wind gusting.
    Fishing, swimming, or reading while at anchor.
    Fry up rock fish and zucchini.
    Slide into the cramped cabin and be woken up with the rain splashing the deck, warm and dry.
    Wondering what calamities or mayhem we may have to dodge or survive.

    Seems enticing for two or three backpackers expanding on ways to explore or chill.
    I get this, much as I was after in a cruising rowboat. I don't want to be the guy putting you off, just comparing my actual trips to the dream. Looks like you are in N CA and will be cruising the same area I do.

    First, the weather. All summer it's not going to rain, and in a winter storm you probably won't want to be out. The times you need the cabin to get out of the rain will be few. Sleeping out under the open stars is a lot nicer than a cramped cabin, and a lot cooler in the summer. Plus we have almost no mosquitoes on salt water.

    Second, my wife likes to camp and thought she would take to row cruising. After a few trips, though, not so much. I do most trips solo now, or in company with sailboats. Make sure you really are both into this before all the effort to build the boat.

    Third, are you really thinking of the outer waters along the coast? This is a rough coast with high summer winds and few harbors. There are few days when it's a relaxed trip as you envision. Inside the Bay is safer, but still very rough in the wind. Not many good places to anchor overnight in the Bay either, it's so built up. The best local area for rowcruising is the Delta, thousands of miles of waterways with funky little marinas and plenty of safe spots to overnight alone.

    -Rick

  32. #102
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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    No worries! I happen to really like CLC's expedition wherry as a rowing boat for camping, but that's not what you were after. having been blown around a lot in my skerry on short rowing jaunts, locally, I would be extremely wary of introducing much windage on an existing design, as has been stated multiple times in this thread.

    Walkabout...best solution I've ever seen for what it sounds like you have in mind, but I said that already.

    Honestly, if I wanted to row-camp with a friend, I think that I should have my boat and they should have their boat and we tie up together and hang out in the evenings. Personally, I don't think I'd want to give up so much rowing performance for the ability to sleep two people. I mean, think about it. So my wife and I go backpacking a couple of times every summer. We splurged and bought a new tent this year since our 30 year old Sierra Designs tent was feeling a bit heavy-ish. The floor dimensions of our tent, which is a Marmot Tungsten UL3P is 66 x 90. OK, I'm a BIG guy and for us this is a luxurious tent, if I was normal sized we might be able to use the Tungsten 2P which is 46 x 88. That would be awfully tight, though. I bet the Mrs. would NOT be happy in the middle of the night when I rolled over. However, let's pretend that your partner is tiny and has minimal "personal space" needs. You need 48 inches of width in which to sleep next to each other, to keep it "backpacking dimensions.

    This means that, at a drop-dead minimum, you're going to need a boat which is 46-48 inches wide in the sleeping area. Not only that, but the tent floor is a rectangle, and the only boats I know of that are really rectangles are the puddle ducks and I don't think you want to row one of those. If you compromised with 46 inches at the hips, narrowing towards the feet from there, and probably widening towards the head, assuming that you have your head amidships, and you put that space in one end of the boat or the other, you can pretty easily derive the basic dimensions of the minimum boat that you need.

    If you assume that you're sleeping in the bow, the boat is going to be something on the order of 7-8 feet long from the general rowing area, going forward. It will be 46 inches wide, halfway between the bow and the rowing cockpit. I'd guesstimate that the beam in the rowing area will be something on the order of 54 inches, sort of fairing in a smooth curve in my head, here. If the rowing cockpit is 5 feet long, you'll need at least 5 more feet in the stern for "stuff" and generally to keep the hull symmetrical. Add it up...about 17 feet LOA and a midships beam of about 54 inches.

    The only way to get around this that I can think of is have you sleep in the bow and your partner sleep in an analogous space in the stern, with about 5-6 feet of rowing area in the middle. If you did that you would build a boat that was 28-32 inches wide at the beam. and something on the order of 21 feet long. Why 21? Well, 5 feet in the middle for rowing space and a passenger to sit. 6 feet at each end to sleep in, X 2 of course...12 feet.. 2 more feet at each end for the final taper of the hull to bow and stern. Add it up.
    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

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    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    17 feet LOA with a midships beam of 54 inches... if you sleep next to each other.

    A Caledonia Yawl is 19 ft. 6 in. long, Beam is 6 ft. 4-1/2 in..too big

    the Ness Yawl is 19' 2" with a beam of 5' 3"... too big.

    Tirrik is
    Length 16' 10". Beam is 5' 4" - 1.64m....there's the length you need, it's a bit wider than absolutely necessary, but it's designed to sail and row, not just row.

    The Hvalsoe 16 is in the ballpark, a really nice rowing boat, just a touch short, but some extra beam, so it all might work out. Again, you'd have to come up with a way to create shelter. A wooden hoop, or maybe even a fold-up fiberglass or aluminum tent pole with a waterproof tarp might do it.


    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,035

    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Quote Originally Posted by rgthom View Post
    I get this, much as I was after in a cruising rowboat. I don't want to be the guy putting you off, just comparing my actual trips to the dream. Looks like you are in N CA and will be cruising the same area I do.

    First, the weather. All summer it's not going to rain, and in a winter storm you probably won't want to be out. The times you need the cabin to get out of the rain will be few. Sleeping out under the open stars is a lot nicer than a cramped cabin, and a lot cooler in the summer. Plus we have almost no mosquitoes on salt water.

    Second, my wife likes to camp and thought she would take to row cruising. After a few trips, though, not so much. I do most trips solo now, or in company with sailboats. Make sure you really are both into this before all the effort to build the boat.

    Third, are you really thinking of the outer waters along the coast? This is a rough coast with high summer winds and few harbors. There are few days when it's a relaxed trip as you envision. Inside the Bay is safer, but still very rough in the wind. Not many good places to anchor overnight in the Bay either, it's so built up. The best local area for rowcruising is the Delta, thousands of miles of waterways with funky little marinas and plenty of safe spots to overnight alone.

    -Rick
    This. SO so so so so so THIS. Read what Rick just wrote, twice. No, three times....
    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    472

    Default Re: Cruising Rowboat

    Build the rowboat you want. Build a skin on frame canoe or punt. Rig the SOF boat overhead as a sunshade by day and as an outrigger at night. Put up a tent on the amas for camping. It might work, and you might be the first.

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