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Thread: Epiglass Everdure

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Oregon
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    John Welsford recommened this product to aid in rot protection. I did a search on the internet and found no links to the good ole' USA. Anyone know of a supplier or simular product? It is supposed to be used on initial construction to aid in rot protection. This product has the viscosity of water, so it penetrates easily and has a fungicide. Then it is paintable when it dries. We are talking a plywood lap construction. I am trying to avoid encapsulating with epoxy, although epoxy will be used as a glue (typical Welsford procedure).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    New Zealand
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    Everdure (in NZ) is thinned only with Xylene and N-Butanone,(solvents only) whereas CPES has a list of wood nurturers/preservatives as long as your arm,some of which remain after the solvent has gone.I would get it confirmed that Everdure in the US still has a fungicide in it.
    The proportions of "additives" in CPES
    is crucial to its performance in allowing undiluted epoxy and other products to adhere.
    No, I don't work for Smith & Co, and, I am bagging epiglass for not doing the R&D to continue the preservative in their product.(They removed it in this country because of "problems")
    The MSDS for CPES is well known,but the effort to get the proportions right is not worth making it yourself.
    CPES-
    Epoxy A&B
    Naptha CAS # 64742-95-6 *
    xylene (common paint store solvent)
    toluene (common paint store solvent)
    isopropyl alcohol (2-propanol) (common, cheap rubbing alcohol)
    2-butanone
    4-methyl 2-pentanone
    2-heptanone
    4-methyl 2-hexanone
    2-pentanone
    dipropylene glycol monomethylether
    diisobutyl ketone
    ethyl acetate
    isobutyl acetate
    ethyl 3-ethoxy propionate
    propylene glycol monomethylether acetate
    hexyl acetate
    isobutyl isobutyrate
    diacetone alcohol
    cyclohexanone

    Volatile organic content (VOC) 675 grams / liter

    CRC has a similar product that has "Busan" a solvent borne fungicide in it.Don't know its track record.

    [ 02-05-2006, 02:33 PM: Message edited by: Puka ]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    New Zealand's Far North
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    Puka , I didnt know that everdure no longer has preservatives in it.
    I always thought it a bit expensive for diluted epoxy so being the parsimonious soul that I am, after I had used up my first tin I used regular epoxy thinned with meths after reading lots on the subject and consulting a relative who is an epoxy chemist.(In future I may go to other solvents).

    His recommendation was to make sure the thinned epoxy had gone off completely before glassing to avoid outgassing bubbling under the glass; and to finally cover with unthinned epoxy any areas that werent to have glass over them.

    This applied to glass/ply construction but I did it to frames that I replaced as well as plywood areas.

    I looked at your link the other day, you have certainly taken the bull by the horns!
    Looking good!

    Grant.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2003
    Location
    Oregon
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    Puka,

    So I gather you recommend CPES as the product to use in my application? I have no interest in formulating my own. Being thin viscosity, it should go further than regular epoxy. After the coating with CPES you can go directly to primer paint?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    In the workshop
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    Hrmmm I agree with Stiletto on this one thined out epoxy it still soaks in and theres no probs with glassing over it..... I have seen many issues with epoxy not sticking to everdure.
    I worked for a company that made pool tables and bar tops we had a bloke there who would take 5l of pox and turn it into about 20l of sealer just like everdure only it exothermed bad if not used quickly.... never got the recpie.
    I've always thined epoxy with epoxy thinner or acetone, although acetone seems to retard the epox a bit so u don't go past 10%

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    FL. USA
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    If you add a thinner such as interlux's 2333n, it will penetrate forever and you will swear you used the CPES. I mixed thin slow epoxy and let it set for 30 mins. Mixed it at about 30% epoxy and kept painting it on until it(this took awhile) wouldn't take anymore.I use this where I have maybe sanded through the epoxy coating on edges almost and it does a great job.It will also etch somewhat into sanded epoxy and will leave a film.The cure to touch time was 6 hrs.It crystalized termite damaged wood and made it tougher.If you stand a piece of red cedar about the size of an avg paint stir it,it will wick well up into the wood.I can't get the spec sheet to load on the site but what I can still make out on the can is keytone,glycol ether acetate,some other acetates. It is the thinner used for their epoxy 2 part primer.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
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    Old Salt

    CPES is a great product, but like anything has its limitations.I suggest you contact Smith & co to get a technical manual on its suitability to your application. After removing rot infected/degraded timber as a pretreatment to scarfing in a new piece,I think,used correctly,
    it is ideal.
    Puka , I didnt know that everdure no longer has preservatives in it.
    Gidday Stilleto!
    Yeah, they don't advertise the fact.Pity CPES is not readily available here. Most of the time I guess the DIY thinned epoxy suits our purpose.
    I favour heating regular epoxy and putting it on rapidly, neat.

    Re the Stewart 34
    After a year of trying to dry the S34 out (including force drying)and pretty much gutting it, John Lydguard dropped the clanger on me that he didn't think it was worth fixing.
    He is probably right, but a "boats worth" can be
    the subject of much philosophising.
    So stopped dismantling and started rebuilding mid January. Its a great feeling! [img]tongue.gif[/img]

    [ 02-06-2006, 02:59 AM: Message edited by: Puka ]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Sheldon, Qld Australia
    Posts
    886

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    The MSDS for Everdure indicats that it still contains phenol.

    I while back "thechemist" gave a graphic account of what phenol can do to living creatures. I guess rot spores would not survive after being coated with everdure.

    I believe it was at this thread but the thread is no longer there.

    http://www.woodenboat-ubb.com/ubb/ul...c;f=1;t=001462

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
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    I would not regard Phenolics, generally, as timber preservatives.No more than other solvents
    present in proprietry low visc epoxy sealers.Solvents blow off,fungicides/preservatives should reside, and in this context,have little effect on subsequent glue adhesion.There lies the problem.
    Contact Paul Oman,next to the chemist, he has a handle on it. info@epoxyproducts.com <info@epoxyproducts.com>

    Penetrating epoxies

    ABCD=CPES [img]smile.gif[/img]

    [ 02-08-2006, 02:43 PM: Message edited by: Puka ]

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