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Thread: Building a Brockway

  1. #1
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    Default Building a Brockway

    I have an unexpected two weeks off from work (starting yesterday) and I'm going to see just how far I can get on building a 16' Brockway Skiff. Today I picked up some MDO plywood and lumber from the local lumberyard, brought it home and cut out the sides and transom. The transom is doubled 3/4" plywood and the sides are 1/2" plywood scarfed together with a 3/4" plywood butt block. The glue is drying on these pieces now, I'm hoping to attach the sides to the stem and transom tomorrow.

    I'm lucky to have Auroradan's 16' Brockway in the driveway for reference during this project. He built his a little different than what the plans show, and I plan on building mine a little different than the plans and Dan's example show. My primary modifications will be external chines (instead of the as-planned internal chines) and 1/2" plywood for the bottom (as opposed to the 3/4" called for in the plans). I'm also going to cover the bottom and external chines with fiberglass and epoxy with a graphite-epoxy finish coat, all hot-coated in one day.

    No pics yet as I got into the process and didn't take any. The parts are sitting on the flatbed trailer/workbench in the driveway, covered up to stay dry until tomorrow.

    Plans at http://www.soundschool.com

    Direct link to the free PDF plans here: http://www.soundschool.com/brockway16ft.pdf

    I'll post pics here as I go along!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Why external chines versus internal chines? What are the pros and cons?
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Why external chines versus internal chines? What are the pros and cons?
    IMHO the biggest con to internal chine logs is that they catch and retain water unless you cut the top of the chine log at an angle. Notching frames is kind of a pain too. External chines have neither issue and are well-used by many designers (notably Bolger and Michalak). They also provide something to hold on to when the boat flips over ;-) They'll give a good "edge" to the fiberglass covering on the bottom and the screw heads will be inside the boat, down in the bilge where you can't really see them (as opposed to outside the planking, like with internal chine logs).

    They're also sort of easier to install, and I'm lazy like that.

    The con is that some folks think they're ugly. They can probably interfere with water flow and/or increase drag and therefore lower efficiency, or something like that. Having a major structural member outside of your boat can theoretically make it more prone to damage too.

    Just my opinion of course, your results may vary!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    That's a great list of pros and cons, thanks. I've been pushing around the idea of building a small outboard skiff to keep at a friend's place on the Hood Canal, and hope to get moving sometime within the month. I'm still weighing designs.

    I'll be watching this thread, too.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    I would think that trying to bend external chines (of 2x4s) around the bottom of that boat will change the shape of the boat some. when you bend in an internal chine the chine tends to force the plywood OUT, when you try to bend it on the outside it will try to bend the plywood IN.

    Good luck meeting the deadline, I think you will make it!

    Jerry

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    I built a Phil Bolger dory with external chines years ago. Installing them was easier than installing internal chines and made absolutely no difference to how the plywood sides curved. The principal downside to them is they make the boat pound more in chop than it would with internal chines. Otherwise they were a good idea, leaving the interior of the boat easier to clean, as well as giving the sides a bit of protection against rocks when exploring interesting shorelines. If you consider them ugly I won't argue that one.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Greg I love the lines of that little boat, so I want a ride when she's done!

    Let's see some photos.

    Oh, and if you have time off this week, why not go tuna fishing?

    E

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    E - I'd love to go Tuna Fishing! I'm able to go any day between next Thursday (the 9th) and the 18th, just let me know!

    Progress pics forthcoming...

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    We are unfortunately just fishing the 8th, then a couple shifts of work, then a quick trip to Munich for Oktoberfest, Czech Republic, back to Munich, Salzburg Austria, then home for the winter preparation season.

    E

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    First off, I'd like to say that my plan to go 3D with the sides and transom today was unrealistic. I forgot to take into account the drying time needed for the glue on the stem.

    Today is going well, I started by attaching the sides to the stem. Here's one side attached to the stem:



    And with both sides attached:



    The glue joint is going to be left to dry over the next 24 hours. The plans state to drive the stem into the ground a couple feet before attaching the sides. I have to admit that doing that would have made the process easier.

    I then moved on to constructing the temporary mold from some 2x4's:



    I added some cross-bracing after I took that pic.

    The transom was dry/cured, next step was to cut out a space for the motor:



    I'm leaving the top uncut until I finish the build, as I'm not exactly sure how tall I will be making the sides.

    Last for today is scarfing the chine logs together. I have four 8' pieces of CVG Fir from the local lumber yard. Truly beautiful stuff, tight straight grain. I have 1 1/2 scarfs cut. For the purists out there, I'm cutting the scarfs with a Bailey #5C handplane and doing final cleanup with a Stanley 60 1/2% low-angle block plane.

    See, I'm not a complete heathen ;-)

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Last pics of the day. It took me about half an hour to get the hand planes up to snuff, but after that they worked beautifully!

    Four neatly hand-cut scarf joints and a pile of wood shavings to prove it:



    The chine logs epoxied and clamped in place. I'll pull the clamps apart tomorrow afternoon:



    That's all for now, tomorrow should see the boat start to look like a boat!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by jerry bark View Post
    I would think that trying to bend external chines (of 2x4s) around the bottom of that boat will change the shape of the boat some. when you bend in an internal chine the chine tends to force the plywood OUT, when you try to bend it on the outside it will try to bend the plywood IN.
    Jerry
    I'm not sure how that would happen, but if that's your experience I won't argue it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Hazard View Post
    If you consider them (external chines) ugly I won't argue that one.
    Oh, -I- don't consider them ugly, I'm just saying that some other folks might. I'm more of a function over form guy myself, so aesthetics aren't of huge importance to me. I'll work in beauty where I can, but I'd rather have an ugly boat that performs well than a useless showpiece.

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Greg, are you going to increase the freeboard, like Auroradan did to his boat?

    I like the external chine idea-- the pros definately outweigh the cons for a boat like this.

    John
    John
    ----
    To err is human. To arr is pirate.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Greg,

    Lookin' good. Missed you at Brian's today, but we had a plethora of warm bodies and got his Lily Pad turned over just fine. Since Dan wasn't any good for lifting, we laid him down to cushion the rollover. Other than the volume of his complaints, it worked great

    Noticed a couple things about your fotos. I see that your planed scarfs looked good, but the second from the bottom was off by about 1/32" at the heel. I'm sure it went together fine, though. Also... that poor little green skiff looks dwarfed between Titan and the FireEngine Brockway. I think you should find him a new home before he develops in inferiority complex. Maybe somewhere with only similar sized boats, eh?

    Seriously... I think it's great that you're building a Brockway. They seem to be great boats - esp. for the time/money invested. Could be the beginnings of an Oregon Brockway fleet. And I'm willing to bet that yours won't sink straight to the bottom the first day, like Dan's did
    Last edited by David G; 09-06-2010 at 10:20 AM.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by wharf rat View Post
    Greg, are you going to increase the freeboard, like Auroradan did to his boat?

    I like the external chine idea-- the pros definately outweigh the cons for a boat like this.

    John
    Probably not. The plans call for a 2x6 to be molded along the top of the plywood sides to act as a gunwale. The 2x6 is to overlap the plywood by 1 1/2", giving a 4" addition in height to the freeboard. I'm debating whether to even add that! I probably will add that height, either as 1/2" plywood like Dan did or as a 1x6. I'm just not sure yet.

    Anyone have any thoughts?
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    From a workboat standpoint Greg, I'd put, at a minimum, the 1x6 up there. It will obviously stiffen the boat significantly, but also gives you a big, strong rubrail to scare lesser, more expensive boats away. It also is very handy when hauling pots or gear over the rail as you don't have to gingerly avoid rope, chain, or objects hitting the planking at the top. Maybe a stepped gunnel of 1x6 and 1x3 layered on one another to improve bendability and reduce weight? Or a 1x6 and an outer shoe of HDPE or something industrial for the rubrail? Just spitballin' here.

    E

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Greg,

    Lookin' good. Missed you at Brian's today, but we had a plethora of warm bodies and got his Lily Pad turned over just fine. Since Dan wasn't any good for lifting, we laid him down to cushion the rollover. Other than the volume of his complaints, it worked great

    Noticed a couple things about your fotos. I see that your planed scarfs looked good, but the second from the bottom was off by about 1/32" at the heel. I'm sure it went together fine, though. Also... that poor little green skiff looks dwarfed between Titan and the FireEngine Brockway. I think you should find him a new home before he develops in inferiority complex. Maybe somewhere with only similar sized boats, eh?

    Seriously... I think it's great that you're building a Brockway. They seem to be great boats - esp. for the time/money invested. Could be the beginnings of an Oregon Brockway fleet. And I'm willing to bet that yours won't sink straight to the bottom the first day, like Dan's did
    Yes yes, I'm still going to get the green one to you, I promise. I just haven't had a chance to unload it yet.

    I did just realize that Dan bought a whaleboat after I did and now I'm building a Brockway after he built his. Huh.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spokaloo View Post
    From a workboat standpoint Greg, I'd put, at a minimum, the 1x6 up there. It will obviously stiffen the boat significantly, but also gives you a big, strong rubrail to scare lesser, more expensive boats away. It also is very handy when hauling pots or gear over the rail as you don't have to gingerly avoid rope, chain, or objects hitting the planking at the top. Maybe a stepped gunnel of 1x6 and 1x3 layered on one another to improve bendability and reduce weight? Or a 1x6 and an outer shoe of HDPE or something industrial for the rubrail? Just spitballin' here.

    E
    Yeah, I was thinking the same thing. It would be possible to replace the gunnels when they get worn out too. Dan used some sort of plasticish stuff for his rubrails, I'm going to try and find out what it is and use the same stuff. It's almost a trex-type material.

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Short day today, some progress and a setback.

    First, the progress!

    The glue holding the sides to the stem was cured, so it was time to make this thing start to look like a boat. The plans call for one mold approx. 5' 5" forward of the transom-end of the sides. Unfortunately, the plans don't say whether to measure from the gunwale-end or the chine-end. I measured from the chine-end; I figured that if I was going to screw it up I'd rather have a boat that was too fat up front than too narrow.

    A spanish windlass was rigged up and the sides drawn together until the mold fit snugly. It was secured with two screws per side, one top and one bottom. The screw holes should be sealed when the chine and sheer clamps are added. Here's how it looked:



    The windlass had to be reset three times as it pulled in the sides. I drew it in so that the transom was loose by about an inch, then performed a test-fit. Everything looked good, so on went the PL Premium. Screws are holding it together as well. Here's how it looked:



    Screws were driven into the center of the stem, mold and transom; they lined up perfectly. The transom was triangulated off the mold center-screw and was found to be almost perfect (1/8" off is acceptable to me). The stem was likewise triangulated to the mold edges and found to be 1/2" off. A quick nudge of the stem and we were within specs. Hooray!

    Now for the setback...

    The chines I scarfed together yesterday came out of the clamp this morning. The epoxy was still a bit tacky. I looked at the scarf joint edgewise and was horrified to see light. Lots of it. I had apparently carved a hollow into the scarf faces. The hollow was large enough that there was too much space for the epoxy to bridge at the consistency to which I had mixed it. I tested one chine on the boat and it broke. I tested the second and it passed. Hmmm.....

    The broken one was glued back together with thicker epoxy and better clamping. The unbroken one had thickened epoxy injected into the joint with a syringe and the edges capped with extremely thick epoxy to hold the rest in. The broken-and-reglued one is on top, the injected-epoxy one is on the bottom:



    I'm leaving everything in place for a couple of days to allow adhesives to set. Next will come chine log installation followed by floor timber installation, which will then be followed by bottom installation. She's coming along!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Stoll View Post
    Probably not. The plans call for a 2x6 to be molded along the top of the plywood sides to act as a gunwale. The 2x6 is to overlap the plywood by 1 1/2", giving a 4" addition in height to the freeboard. I'm debating whether to even add that! I probably will add that height, either as 1/2" plywood like Dan did or as a 1x6. I'm just not sure yet.

    Anyone have any thoughts?
    Attach 1 1x6 then add the second one over the first. bending 2 1x6's one at a time and glueing them together with epoxy is easier than bending a 2x6.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by jclays View Post
    Attach 1 1x6 then add the second one over the first. bending 2 1x6's one at a time and glueing them together with epoxy is easier than bending a 2x6.
    Yeah, I could, and that's what the plans call for. I'm just not sure that I need/want a sheer clamp that thick. These boats were made to be used by folks who worked them every day with rakes, traps and nets. I just don't think I need that much material (and weight). I'm about 85% sure I'll use a single fir 1x6.

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Greg,

    She's looking great! Good move not to cut down the transom corners like I did on mine. After mine went 3D is when I relized the shear needed to be taller forward amidships for planned standing wheelhouse. Now I have to go back and fill in transom corners where shear cap meets it. She is a bit heavy but I'm a big guy and plan to take her out to the Pacific Ocean fishing and want to come back on my own and not after a Mayday call on VHF!

    For those interested, this is my photobucket page of my Brockway build about a year ago http://s156.photobucket.com/albums/t...%2016%20Skiff/ Used 1/2' MDO plywood, papered and primed (for sign painting) both sides. Transom made of three layers, 1/2" bottom (reason for extra ribs) and 1/2" sides. I need to go back and strip and glass her before completing the wheelhouse.

    Dan
    Darwin
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  22. #22
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Looks great so far. Hey Spokaloo, I was wondering how your boat did, don't want to hijack this thread but wondering how the tuna test went at bouy 10?
    I saw ya towing her back threw Nine Mile the other morning and she looks great on the trailer

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Greg mi ladd.. I am waiting for more on this build. Please do tell more.
    Jim

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by jclays View Post
    Greg mi ladd.. I am waiting for more on this build. Please do tell more.
    Jim
    Greg has a cute girlfriend. He may have something other than boat building on his mind....

    Dan
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  25. #25
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by Auroradan View Post
    Greg has a cute girlfriend. He may have something other than boat building on his mind....

    Dan
    Indeed...

    I spent the last few days with my girlfriend (she had a few days off). I meant to get some work done today but that didn't happen, so it's a long day tomorrow! The plan is to install chines, plane everything down and install the bottom. I'll post more then!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    I woke up at 7:00 this morning after a (mostly) sleepless night and got right to work. The next step was chines.

    I pulled the clamps off and planed away the epoxy overflow from the re-glue I did the other day. Here are the joints:



    Looks pretty ok-ish, eh?

    Next was attachment. I started on the Starboard side, putting in 1" galvanized screws every two inches as I went. Since I'm working alone I started in the middle to take advantage of the natural balance-point of the chine without the need for extra support. Worked towards the bow first, clamping a few inches ahead, securing a screw and working my way back to the "wet edge" of the screw line:



    As I got closer to the bow it got easier to clamp:



    Each end of the chine was secured with 2" coated deck screws, pre-drilled and countersunk into the chine. Here's the stem:



    From there I worked from the middle towards the stern, then repeated the process on the other side. Here's the end result:



    Chines! You can see the 2x6 DF keel taking shape in the background.

    One thing about external chines, I think I'm going to end up planing off more wood than I would had I kept them internal. I don't think it'll be a big deal though, maybe an extra 1/4" gone.

    Chines were complete by 9:00, back into the house to update this thread and then maybe a nap. The glue (PL Premium!) should be cured enough to allow planing without gumming up the plane by 1:00. I'll get to work then, leveling everything out, installing floor timbers and (with any luck) securing the bottom.

    Everything appears to be on schedule, which is advantageous as I've already scheduled the boat turning for Sunday afternoon ;-)
    Last edited by Greg Stoll; 09-10-2010 at 12:53 PM.
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    A long day, and it's not over yet!

    First, the failure. One of my scarfs (partially) failed again. I had to re-glue it and clamp the whole thing with a piece of plywood screwed over the scarf itself. There was a hard spot in the chine due to the partial failure, which necessitated a bit of a patch in the form of a chunk of 3/4" plywood on the back side of the chine. It's the rectangle at the top of the picture:



    That will delay the bottom; more on that later...

    I managed to plane the chines flat with my trusty Bailey #5C and then went about cutting floor timbers. The Brockway design calls for three floor timbers at 48" centers measured off the aft edge of the transom. The plans give the option of either 2x4 or 4x4. I went with the 4x4 (more room for error).

    Starting at the aft end, I measured forward 48" and marked the center and edges of the floor timber on the chine. A little work with the marking gauge to transfer the angles to the 4x4:



    I built this jig to hold the floor timbers in place while installing screws:



    Here's the aft floor timber in place, ready for glue and screws:



    A reasonable fit, eh?



    A shot of the midships frame:



    I didn't get any shots of the forward frame, it was pretty small anyhow ;-)

    I can assure you that they're all in, glued and screwed.

    I need to run to the store now for some supplies and a new cheap handsaw. With any luck I'll be able to plane down the last section of chine where I have the clamp now and install the bottom tonight.

    Wish me luck!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Very nice Greg. I am watching your build with interest. I too now have the plans for the 14ft and 16ft Brockway skiffs from the Sound School. I wish That I could get an 18ft and I have heard that 20ft brockways also exist. Those plans would be good to get a hold of. Keep it up. I have plans for the 12ft Frugal skiff from Paul Bennet's Shoe String Ship yard. Basically a Brockway type. Paul has a main frame that is a permenent installation that is basically like the temporary one on the Brockway plan. I wondering if the Temp frame of the brockway could be incorporated as a permenent frame. I will modify this frame as in the Frugal skiff design when I build my Brockway and see how it comes out.
    Jim

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Whew, what a day....

    Lets see, I last left off at floor timbers I think.

    After returning from the store I set about prepping for a bottom installation. Chines ends were trimmed, various overhangs were planed smooth and the chine bevel was checked (and tweaked) one last time.

    Then...........

    One more frame.

    The plans call for the bottom to be made out of three whole sheets of material, one per major section with a scrap piece for the part up forward. I deviated from the plans a little here by using only two sheets of plywood for the bottom. The aft and middle sections went on as directed, and their offcuts together became the forward section. This, of course, requires a little reinforcement. Enter the 1x5 CVG Fir:



    Pretty standard little keel-like thing I think.

    Next, I cut out the panels and dry-fit them:



    Getting late, note the long shadows...

    You'll notice that the major forward section has the seam slightly off to one side. That was to accommodate the different sizes of offcuts from the other two sections. The small triangular sections forward of that were offcuts from planking, which wouldn't have been possible had I used the designed 3/4" plywood for the bottom.

    Next is glue, but first we must cut limbers:



    Quickly cut with a circular saw, nothing fancy but they'll move water.

    It took me a little over an hour to spread the glue, lay the panels down and fasten everything. Here's the result:



    It's really starting to look like a boat. The panels overhang the sides a little, but we can easily fix that tomorrow morning. I just barely made it, as the sun had set behind the hills just 5 minutes before this picture was taken. I'm getting pretty excited, tomorrow is filling/fairing the bottom followed by a coat of epoxy & 8oz glass cloth and a finish coat of graphite-enriched epoxy.

    Boat turning on Sunday!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by jclays View Post
    Very nice Greg. I am watching your build with interest. I too now have the plans for the 14ft and 16ft Brockway skiffs from the Sound School. I wish That I could get an 18ft and I have heard that 20ft brockways also exist. Those plans would be good to get a hold of. Keep it up. I have plans for the 12ft Frugal skiff from Paul Bennet's Shoe String Ship yard. Basically a Brockway type. Paul has a main frame that is a permenent installation that is basically like the temporary one on the Brockway plan. I wondering if the Temp frame of the brockway could be incorporated as a permenent frame. I will modify this frame as in the Frugal skiff design when I build my Brockway and see how it comes out.
    Jim
    Thanks Jim, I'm posting this so folks like yourself can have enough confidence to jump into it. I considered the 14' Brockway as well, but decided it was too small for my needs (it's smaller than the boat I already have). According to the articles in the plans Earl Brockway built a number of "stock" designs of various lengths over his career. The 14' & 16' skiffs were put down into paper-plan form to be sent all over the world as a cheap, easy way for native fishermen to get on the water when they experienced a catastrophe. I'm not sure if anyone ever made plans for any of his other boats.

    As for using the mold as a frame, I'm don't think that would work too well. Wait until Monday (I think...) and you'll see what I mean. The mold only uses three 2x4's, which around here totals about $6. No big deal and well worth it.

    If you end up building one let me know, I'd like to see how yours turns out!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Turner, Oregon
    Posts
    386

    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by boylesboats View Post
    Greg,

    Am I hearing those funny little 4 letters words in there somewhere????
    Oh, I don't know, maybe...

    It was a remarkably long and productive day!

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tuscon AZ
    Posts
    5,214

    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Great story and photos of your project. Thanks!
    Waiting to see what happens tomorrow.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Beach CA
    Posts
    1,244

    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Thanks again Greg. I cant wait for more. What does the graphite filled epoxy do?
    Jim
    Last edited by jclays; 09-11-2010 at 10:10 AM.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Turner, Oregon
    Posts
    386

    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Today was the first time I failed to reach my daily goal on this project...

    I started off by trimming the overhang from the bottom planking. Trimmed close with a circular saw and then planed down to the chine, first with the Bailey #5C and the later with the Stanley 60 1/2. Here's how it looked:



    The broken scarf healed somewhat, but it's still not how I wanted it. Oh well, I have a reinforcement in that area so I should be alright. Here's where I left it:



    After trimming the edge I filled the screwheads and various irregularities with thickened epoxy. Then off to run some errands, then back home to the boat.

    I'm trying something different on this project; I'm planning ahead and masking stuff off. Here the sides and transom are masked ahead of the epoxy application:



    I marked the outline of where the keel timber will be:



    And started laying on cloth and epoxy. I'm using is 7.8 ounce cloth from Tap Plastics; the epoxy is West System. It took over an hour, but I finally got it laid out and smoothed over the bottom and the chines.

    Ready to see it?



    Pretty effing snazzy if I do say so myself.

    Unfortunately, I'm now out of epoxy. That means that I have to drive to Oregon City (about an hour away) first thing in the morning to pick up more. Grrrr....

    Also, the boat turning has been rescheduled for Monday at 10:00. If anyone would like to come to see the boat and provide some muscular help turning it over you're certainly welcome to do so. I'm located between Turner and Jefferson, Oregon (southeast of Salem about 10 miles). PM me for the address.

    Until tomorrow,

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Turner, Oregon
    Posts
    386

    Default Re: Building a Brockway

    Quote Originally Posted by jclays View Post
    Thanks again Greg. I cant wait for more. What does the graphite filled epoxy do?
    Jim
    Hi Jim,

    I'm treading on controversial ground here, and I'm sure you can find a number of threads on this forum from folks who agree and disagree with me...

    Graphite mixed with epoxy helps it stand up to UV degradation and provides a slick, hard surface for a boat bottom. It also negates the need for painting and gives a long-term finish. Some folks disagree with me and that's fine; I had graphite epoxy on the bottom of a previous boat and loved it, so I'm going to do it again.

    Greg
    And if it doesn't work out
    There'll never be any doubt
    That the pleasure
    Was worth all the pain

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