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Thread: Vietnamese boats

  1. #201

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Time to put some life in this thread. I spent 5 weeks in Viet Nam from late November through the first of the new year. I'd promised that I would see what I could photograph of local boats, not expecting much really, but I managed quite profitably. After two and a half weeks in the North I spent 10 days in the Mekong Delta, in the western province of An Giang. For one day I rented a small sampan from the Long Xuyen waterfront and went back up the Ong Chuong Canal to Cho Moi and then around Cu lao Tay almost halfway to Chau Doc and Cambodia. I'd gone down through the canal twice during the war 40 years ago and have retained clear memories of it being one of the prettiest inland passages I've ever made. I wasn't disappointed and will make several postings here of boats, boatyards and of the industries which keep these boats at work. There are still many many of the traditional double ended wooden rice barges, and there are still boat yards building them...plank first and then frames in afterward. The river branches and the canals are filled with busy junks and sampans, transporting people, rice, fruit, rice straw and fire wood.







    The first two images are of the same yard, zoomed in a bit for more detail. The third one is a small river junk with a cargo of Nipa palm nuts, used as food and for making a palm sugar.







    And these above are of markets, large town markets and the impromptu small bank side trading which goes on when an excess of netted fish is landed from the river. Comments and questions welcome...I have a couple of hundred images in the collection and if any one wants I can send/post the link to that, in photobucket.

    Warm regards....Rob
    Last edited by Mattie82; 02-24-2012 at 10:01 AM.

  2. #202
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    That's just great Rob! I never saw any barges being built. Your photos bring back great memories - I'm really missing the place and people!

    Rick

  3. #203

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Rick, I will be posting a few, so keep an eye out for 'em. Don't want to empty the shot locker all at once, so just five or six at a time over a couple of weeks.
    Rob

  4. #204
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Looking forward to lots more piccies Rob! Great stuff! JayInOz

  5. #205

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    OK, same stretch of the Rach Ong Chuong [Ong Chuong Canal] on the way to Cho Moi from Long Xuyen by sampan. Photo of a different yard and zooming in a bit closer...building the large river junks, mostly used for transporting rice and rice chaf / rice straw....





    To illustrate use, right next to the boat yard one of the river junks being loaded: as light as the baskets are and looking at the retaining framework and screens I would say this load is of rice chaf. Un-milled rice is a much heavier cargo and a load of it is pretty much packed below the level of the combing, as the final two photos will show...





    And a couple of shots of one of the junks underway on the Ong Chuong Canal loaded with un-milled rice...




    Again, regards...Rob

    Last edited by Mattie82; 02-23-2012 at 10:14 AM.

  6. #206

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    On a roll here this morning and it's raining so I'm stuck in the house for a bit. To continue, a photo of one of the river junks underway light out on one of the major branches of the Mekong, the Hau Giang, below Chau Doc:



    We stopped for lunch at Cho Moi, leaving our chartered sampan under the one end of a bridge and crossed into town. When I was last here in the early 70s, Cho Moi was a quiet small village under many trees, with mostly unpaved lanes instead of streets. Today it can't be called a village any more.



    On the Cho Moi side of the bridge I looked down on some boat construction...







    Nice, being able to see inside the open hold of one of these junks. Historically, these large river junks were poled against the current or rode with the current and sometimes used small sails. When engines showed up, for many years the junks were tendered by small inboard "pushers", I photographed a number of those in the early 70s. The crew / owners lived in the large house aft. Since I had been here last during the war, it seems that most of the large junks have had engines installed inboard and I didn't see any of the small tenders this time. Putting an engine in what was quarters necessitated moving outside of the space and I saw a lot of the junks with "back porches" built on them...and a lot of them with wheelhouses built above the houses aft which previously were quarters. Regrettable in many ways, but progress. The large quarters aft were airy, quiet except for water noises and family life, with all the wonderful wood bulkheads and decks unpainted and natural. This is a new wheelhouse being readied on the canal bank.



    Regards...Rob

  7. #207

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Small boat, "ghe" in Vietnamese or "sampans", plenty of those and plenty of photos. I didn't get into any "boat" shops so the images are of just boats busy at their tasks. The pivoting, long-tailed engines were already in common use on small boats back in the late 60s, early 70s. You still see boats rowed from a standing position on the stern, and you see everywhere the small engines in use, "outboard" with very few engine boxes for inboard engines in the small boats. The long-tailed engines have gotten larger and there are some fairly substantial boats using one or two of them for propulsion.








    Then the engines. I've "pushed" these images through Photoshop to emphasize the engines; don't want anyone to think that Viet Nam is "black-and-white", like me being surprised when I went to Ha Noi for the first time in 2005 and was surprised that it was "in color".





    And just to be sure and hold your interest, a random shot of another large river junk being built:



    ​Warm regards...Rob



  8. #208

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    More, small boats, larger boats with "outboard, long-tailed" engines, stuff.....





    There is a tail shaft emerging from behind those checked pajama bottoms hanging to dry over the rudder from the "back porch". I don't think "poop" is the correct term to use, but I mention it here anyway. It's nice to have your coconut dealer show up door-to-door in the morning, saving you the trip to the market.









    Kind of a "salad" of images. These are "boat" people in the truest sense of the expression.

    Regards...Rob

  9. #209

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    I will get back to the Mekong Delta but wanted to post some photos from Ha Long Bay in northern Viet Nam. We took the lunch cruise and the weather was nice and the food was OK, the company was fun on the boat and the passage through some of the islands was very scenic. I have spent a couple of days on this bay five years ago and made a much more thorough tour of the entire bay. We stayed overnight and the next morning got a cab to the market at Hong Gai, across the big bridge. After a couple of hours in the market I asked the cab driver to take us to where the fishing boats docked. He told us that they were out fishing, but I wanted to go anyway. We ended up at the typhoon anchorage and the boats that didn't go fishing were there "a plenty", and I got some wonderful photos [I think anyway]. I will make a couple of postings and show some of them. First from the lunch cruise out on the bay...





    The two boats in the second image are trawling ahead, a net is suspended between the two long poles which project forward off of the two sides of the boats. These were the only boats in the north that I saw which had eyes. When they were moored in the anchorage, they moored stern-in side-by-side and with the much wider for'd end of the fishing rig, several of them moored made a "daisy", reminding me of some of the yacht rendezvous in New England when the boats would moor the same way.



    Then on to the storm anchorage where all the boats were...







    I will follow this posting with a couple of more from Ha Long Bay.

    R
    ob
    Last edited by Mattie82; 02-26-2012 at 07:30 AM.

  10. #210

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    A few more in the storm anchorage at Ha Long Bay, these all were taken in December of 2011. Actually I will show me taking some of them....



    And to the boats...











    This is Ha Long Bay for now.

    Regards...Rob

  11. #211
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Excellent Rob- thanks Did you get to see any of the smaller boats being built? JayInOz

  12. #212
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Terrific Rob! Thanks again for posting all these! Looks like you had a great trip

    Rick

  13. #213

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Quote Originally Posted by JayInOz View Post
    Excellent Rob- thanks Did you get to see any of the smaller boats being built? JayInOz

    Jay, I was in Viet Nam with my wife and on a relatively tight schedule so unfortunately didn't get to see that. Even in the Mekong Delta the boats I saw being built were the larger river junks. The wife is an excellent traveling companion and after 40 years of marriage is quite interested in a lot of things I follow, but this was her first time in northern Viet Nam and getting her into a boat shop was not on the schedule. She has visited a few boat shops and blacksmith establishments for me when home in the Mekong Delta, making wonderful photos and being quite proud of bringing those home to me in the US, but Ha Long Bay was a "whole new world" to her.

  14. #214
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Understood Rob! My wife is also a great travelling companion but there are limits Actually I was talking to a friend the other day who was just about to drive her husband five hours down the coast so that he could attend a bicycle ride for the weekend. I asked her if she had any interest in it or was just bored to death at all these events- she replied that she didn't mind at all- he has a well paid job and she has a black belt in shopping JayInOz

  15. #215
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    A lot of people in these pictures wear surgical masks, why is that?

    I do enjoy all of your posts. I am glad you keep them coming!

  16. #216

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulC View Post
    A lot of people in these pictures wear surgical masks, why is that?

    Paul, this is common in Asia. The masks are thought to help prevent colds and the spread of disease, and they also serve as dust filters. In a country with lots of dirt paths and lanes plus other sources of dust the masks help prevent the inhalation of that.
    Last edited by Mattie82; 02-27-2012 at 01:18 AM.

  17. #217
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Quote Originally Posted by Mattie82 View Post

    Paul, this is common in Asia. The masks are thought to help prevent colds and the spread of disease, and they also serve as dust filters. In a country with lots of dirt paths and lanes plus other sources of dust the masks help inhalation of that.
    Actually, although that's probably quite true in many parts of Asia, it's not the main reason why masks are so common in Vietnam. You'll notice that nearly all, if not all, of the people with masks are women. Vietnamese women work very hard to ensure that their skin is not darkened by the sun - this is why they wear face masks, long sleeves and slacks, and gloves - and hats, of course. Surgical masks are not common in Vietnam. The masks you see are mainly just cotton material. Having said that, many women do enjoy the advantage of not breathing in dust and car fumes while wearing these masks on their motorbikes and bicycles, but it's not the main reason for this practice.

    Rick

  18. #218

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Rick, but then they all wear hats, wide brimmed hats, so they don't get sun on their face anyway. You're probably more correct for the reason they wear masks, but how effective the things are whether for dust or sun is something I wonder about. Then you will see them dress their little kids up with masks in December and January up north in Ha Noi to take them on the xe may [scooters] when there isn't any sunshine for eight to ten weeks, that must be for cold and fumes and health, can't be to prevent tans. It is true though, men don't generally wear masks.

  19. #219
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    That's right about wrapping the kids up and putting the masks on. But, the women wear the full wrap to keep the sun off. We're not talking about preventing sunburn - it's about preventing any darkening at all. They're very aware of the tanning qualities of reflected light. This is not my conclusion - it comes from the people I worked with there for 4 years.

    Rick

  20. #220

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Oh well, it's also a fact that the women do a lot of the really heavy work in Viet Nam. During the war you could be pretty sure that a lot of the large construction equipment operators on civilian contract construction were women. You would think that female laborers would be less concerned with beautiful pale skin, but Rick, you are correct...though I've never seen a Vietnamese woman who has as pale a complexion as is fashionable with Japanese women. The face masks have a very short history in Viet Nam: I have yet to see one in use on the early 20th century and late 19th century photos that I collect.

    Anyway, there is a very large brick industry in the Mekong Delta. When I was there in the early 70s I saw very few brick kilns, but during my visit in December I saw hundreds. The clay, the fuel and the bricks are all transported by junks along the waterways. From what I saw little wood is used for fuel, and that is mostly from the frequent repeated harvesting of small trees. Mostly it seems that rice chaf is used...and the Mekong Delta has plenty of that. I don't know yet where the clay is dug from, but will eventually find that out.

    Loading a river junk from a brick yard, little women with loads of bricks down a springy plank and into the hold. You can wonder how they keep their balance with such a load but see from the broken bricks along the bank that many times they don't. These women aren't using an A-frame like that used in Korea to carry heavy loads.







    Where else can you carry such a load than behind you ?? That's the only way you can see where you're going, along that narrow plank.





    From the junk below, men are unloading bricks for the construction of a new kiln, so all of the heavy labor is not done only by women.



    I will post more images of the brick industry and the river junks so essential to transportation of its materials and products.

    Regards...Rob
    Last edited by Mattie82; 02-27-2012 at 09:00 AM.

  21. #221

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Some of the images are things ashore seen from the water, which is all part of the adventure of boating. A few of these will give some idea of the extent of the brick industry in the Delta. Going onto Google Earth and looking down at the river banks from an elevation of 1000 feet [about 300 meters] the resolution is very good and there are several locations where the numbers of kilns are almost without count. The following are some of the "vistas" of collections of kilns in various locations in the Delta. All of the brick yards are close to the water. The first one is of the brick yards at Sa Dec, easily reached by road from Sai Gon. The next two are fairly remote if traveling by road.







    And some of the junks in use for fueling these brick yards...







    That's it for this morning. We were able to get ashore and into a couple of the brick yards so I have an entire album of photos of the brick industry but will limit the images from that: boats not bricks.

    Regards...Rob

  22. #222
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Thanks for sharing all these great pics and stories, Rob. Absolutely fascinating. Keep 'em coming.


    Steven

  23. #223
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    The face masks have a very short history in Viet Nam: I have yet to see one in use on the early 20th century and late 19th century photos that I collect.
    The shirts with built in gloves and hoods are new too. I think the masks grew with the transfer from bicycles to motorbikes. Women always wore the conical hats on bicycles and, of course, many still do, but large hats just aren't compatible with motorbikes. Up until late 2008 when helmet laws were enforced much more strictly, you saw very few Vietnamese anywhere wearing helmets but most women wore small brimmed hats during the day, especially younger women. I don't know this but my guess would be that as face masks became common in Hanoi and Saigon, as women sought to prevent their faces, particularly noses, from darkening when out on the motorbike, the young women still riding bicycles and working the fields etc. in the rural areas, also took up this practice. In dusty areas and in the rice fields during harvest, you see many women wearing the masks and there's no doubt that this helps to keep dust out of airways but along all the canals and rivers, where there's no dust at all, on every city street during the day, many if not most, and certainly most young women, are wearing the masks. With the new helmet laws after 2008, we saw a big rise in masks and hoods as brimmed hats were replaced with helmets. For those not familiar with VN, I should point out that full-face helmets are quite uncommon in VN, especially in the cities and towns. Almost everyone wears a light, foam skull-cap type helmet (Vietnamese call them rice-cookers). These are adequate for the low-speed traffic in most parts of VN. Sadly, they're useless on the higher speed roads.

    Rob, I visited a couple of brickworks in the north as I too was fascinated by this industry. I have a few photos taken of people loading the kilns, if you'd like to see them, and I would very much like to see some of yours. I don't think there'd be any objection to us posting a few less nautical pictures on this thread would there?

    Rick

    Oh, I already posted some brick kiln photos - see #118 Over to you Rob!
    Last edited by RFNK; 02-27-2012 at 09:49 PM.

  24. #224

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    I mentioned using Google Earth in the last posting to locate the concentrations of brick and terra cotta kilns in the Mekong Delta and want to show a few to illustrate my "mention". I've added texts and arrows pointing out features to the images. Those of you familiar with Viet Nam will recognize the locations. This first one shows the location of an extensive area of kilns on one of the shores of the channel which connects the northern [Tien Giang] and southern [Hau Giang] branches of the Mekong.



    The next two are details of the first one. When you know what to look for the kilns and drying fields can be easily recognized.





    This one will show the brick works on an island across from Sa Dec with a closer view also:






    And finally a small brick works on the river below Can Tho:



    You can go into Google Earth with the coordinates on the bottom of each image and can virtually tour the area yourself and you can easily see that all the brick yards are located on or very close to the river system, the easiest and cheapest transportation for a bulky and heavy product.

    Regards...Rob
    Last edited by Mattie82; 02-28-2012 at 02:06 AM.

  25. #225
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Thank you so much Mattei, and also Rick and Ian, for posting these beautiful pictures, and also documents, from my now adoptive country.

    I do not travel much nowadays anymore, and have never been a great photographer either (only recently had a nearly decent "compact" camera, besides the few "throw-away I only had before...!), and sorry that I do not contribute to this wonderful thread.

    Thank you again, guys
    Luc
    "Homme libre, toujours tu cheriras la mer" (Charles Baudelaire)

  26. #226
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Khong co gi anh!

    Rick

  27. #227

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Before posting this I need to point out that "Mattie82" is the same person as "Mattie64". When I tried to log back in after a year, the machine wouldn't recognize my password so I had to re-register.

    To continue with a few more brick industry related observations and photos: in the previous posting with all the Google Earth images, the distance between the two ends of that red arrow pointing out the brick kiln lined bank is a bit over 3 miles, or just over 5 kilometers.

    From the river a woman piling bricks out in lines to ship, but the lines of un-fired bricks drying in the sun are much more numerous in the brick works. Those lines of un-fired bricks are very evident from the air [Google Earth] but I hadn't realized what they were until actually visiting a brick yard on this recent trip.



    Zooming out to give an idea of the extent of the task:



    And to include a couple of craft on the river, remembering "boats not bricks"...



    Then from a landing we made during a short boat excursion out of Can Tho. We were passing a brick yard on the way upriver and I asked the boat-driver to set us ashore for awhile at the place, where we spent over an hour poking around learning about the business of making bricks...







    This should be enough on the brick industry, probably more than what you wanted to know...but if not then let me know and I can direct you to an additional couple of hundred photos I made of the brick works.

    Warm regards....Rob





    Last edited by Mattie82; 03-01-2012 at 06:42 AM.

  28. #228
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Fantastic Rob!!

    Rick

  29. #229

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Some random boat photos in the Mekong Delta, from the boat, from the shore, from this past December...

    A market-sampan at the Long Xuyen quay:



    Pulling in fish nets on the Ong Chuong Canal:



    Farming on the Cu lao Tay floodplain, with the market boat moored awaiting cargo:



    From the bridge at Cho Moi:



    Working bamboo and rattan on the banks of the Ong Chuong Canal:



    And a boatyard / shipyard "teaser to insure that you will be back for more....




    Regards...Rob

  30. #230

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    The "eyes have it"...Various look-aheads on different boats around the western Mekong Delta



    [well, this first one is trying to look around her nose]









    And this one...all you want to see is the look-aheads anyway, right ??



    Rob



  31. #231
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Very interesting, thanks. That first landscape photo in post 221 looks like a Vermeer painting, nice.
    Gerard>
    Everett, WA

    Il colore del cielo, la forza del mare.

  32. #232

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    I got a few photos of lumber mills in the Ong Chuong Canal from the sampan trip up to Cho Moi from Long Xuyen, so will post some of these in one or two groups. The logs are floated in and sunk in place. The saws are those traveling band saws that run on a couple of tracks, cutting slabs from the top down. They've been in use here in Viet Nam all through the 20th century, introduced by the French.





    The mills on the canal all had some sort of overhead lift to pick the logs out of a narrow slip and ready them one-at-a-time for the saw.







    And it seemed as if a lot of the boat yards were right next to saw mills, logically.



    Then on to another group...

    Rob



  33. #233

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    One of the mills was loaded on a barge, tracks and all, so could float to the logs if a stationary mill was overloaded or if a small lot was in the offing. Wouldn't mind having a scow-rig like this myself...and logs like these sufficient to last the rest of my days...



    And a couple of last images of the inventory at one yard...





    Then some scenery from the sampan: out on the big river, Song Hau Giang off of Long Xuyen, An Giang Province...



    Low water dwelling on the flood plain of Cu Lao Tay...



    Playing around with an image to emphasize the boats, which were lost in busy detail otherwise...



    Warm regards.....Rob




  34. #234
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    These are great Rob. It closes a bit of a gap for me. In the years I was in VN, I never saw any large timber mills or forests of larger trees. I saw a lot of timber cutting and milling, and plywood manufacturing, in the north but all with fairly small timber. I assume the logs you saw were floated down from Laos and Cambodia in the main - is that right?

    Rick

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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Great photos thanks Rob-a little window to another world

  36. #236

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    This morning some more random impressions from the water / around the water in the Mekong Delta. First a confusion of boats on the river at Long Xuyen....



    And less confused....





    And should you need cordage, then several vendors hold forth in the market...



    Out of town and on the River and the canals...





    Warm regards...Rob



  37. #237

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    What the heck, too much traffic crossing the bridge to town at this time in the morning anyway, so I will post a few more random images from the Mekong Delta...

    Fishing and farming, farming and fishing; what they'd call in Tidewater, Virginia, [USA] a "waterman's life"



    Washing up after breakfast, on the Ong Chuong Canal...



    Under the bridge to Cho Moi...



    And boats, always boats. This at one of the innumerable fish farms. Looking down on the Delta with Google Earth the sides of many of the channels look as if there is dust on the water from so many of these floating buildings...





    Even the tugboats have eyes...



    That's it for now. Regards...Rob


  38. #238
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    One modern boat in all these pictures. Do yachts visit this area at all?

  39. #239

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Quote Originally Posted by Raka025 View Post
    One modern boat in all these pictures. Do yachts visit this area at all?

    I haven't spent enough recent time in the Delta to answer that truthfully. I know that there are several companies offering tours by boat, leaving from Saigon, My Tho or Cai Be, from overnight to several days, with destinations as different as going to Phnom Penh or other places in Cambodia, or to a couple of different towns on the river in the lower Mekong. Perhaps with the right connections a yacht might be able to penetrate the Delta and travel. For my taste and purposes I'd rather not take a company tour but would be more apt to charter a local boat. There are steel cargo boats now transporting rice and fuel, and I even saw two steel junks built on the lines of the traditional wood junk. I saw three fiberglass runabouts on the western model, but also saw a few fiberglass canal boats, long and shallow with a transom but having the square red "landing" bow built over traditional eyes, boats pushed by the long tailed engines. Woodenboat forum, so I've posted mostly traditional wood boats. Hope this helps.

  40. #240
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    I really like the way these waterpeople decorate their boats with eyes, and the reasons for doin so.
    That is why I carved some into my boat. How else would she make it home when I cannot see?


    ..don't judge a man till you've walked a mile in his shoes..

  41. #241

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Regarding a steel junk, I will post one here, along with a photo of one of the fiberglass canal boats. You can see that the traditional bow is rendered fairly well in steel and in plastic also. Someone makes the canal boats as a production item as there was a builder's plate in the one I saw, and I have seen some photos of the same hull and color scheme on other websites.



    and the canal boat...



    Then to redeem myself on the site I will post some images of sampans inside the locks on Cu lao Tay, with a closeup to give structural details







    That's five for this morning. Next posting will involve the fishing and fish farming on the branches of the Mekong River.

    Regards...Rob

  42. #242
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    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    As far as modern boats go, there are shops along the delta canals with stacks of fiberglass narrow, longtail boats for sale. Around Saigon, Ca Mau, Can Tho and the other larger centres, you see quite a few modern, small speedboat designs with outboards. I saw one very dilapidated fibreglass yacht in Nha Trang and I know there is a guy in Da Nang who has a modern catamaran who takes tourists out to Cham Island. I never saw any visiting cruising yachts during the years I was in VN but you'd expect there must be some. With the growth of sailing in China and Malaysia, I expect it won't be too long before there are many. The shifting mud banks of coastal VN could be a real limiting factor though, I think. Currently, I'd expect Vietnamese bureaucracy would be a real headache for visiting yachts too.

    Rick

  43. #243

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Lots of different kinds of fishing in the Mekong Delta. Lots of fish-farming and pounds. As I've written, in places from the air the number of floating fish houses looks almost like dust on the water.

    On the Hau Giang River at and below Long Xuyen, with the long scattering of floating houses parallel to the banks...





    On the water these comunities look like this...







    In the following image note the plank taken out of the hull. This is done on both sides and it seems that older junks are used for this. Galvanized screen wire is stretched across the empty plank "runs" and the boats when ballasted deep serve as fish pounds, I think from what I saw as transportation to the markets for the fish kept in the floating house pounds.



    Continued in the next posting...

    Rob




  44. #244

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    To continue with the fish farms....

    Another boat with screen substituted for a plank on either side, to be used for transportation of live fish...



    Then one of these boats being prepared for use...this being done on a canal behind Long Xuyen. Note that the bottom is clad in some sort of sheet metal...











    Other fishing stuff in a later posting....

    Regards....Rob



  45. #245
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Everett, WA
    Posts
    13,180

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    I see in post 241 those sampans lack gunwales and inwales, much like an Adirondack guide boat. Since these sampans see hard use, and since gunwales stiffen the sheer so much, you'd think they would have such a feature. Interesting. Thanks for posting.
    Gerard>
    Everett, WA

    Il colore del cielo, la forza del mare.

  46. #246
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Dooral Dooral, Eastern Oz
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    47,628

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    I posted this one in the pub the other day, but it belongs in here too, I guess. It starts with some Cambodian boats, but includes others on the Mekong and canals. I'm putting a further one together.

    Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  47. #247
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Dooral Dooral, Eastern Oz
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    47,628

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Here's one I thought I'd posted in here, but... apparently not



    That's the remains of one of the fishing boats at Phan Ri Cua, where we'd come into town via the remote track that Luc had put us onto.
    Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

  48. #248
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    875

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Great thread. Has anyone build a traditional Asian riverboat, a sampan or similar? I'd love to know if there were plans available.

  49. #249

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    To answer your question about anyone building a river sampan and measured drawings, members of the Vietnam Wooden Boat Foundation formerly out of Washington state but now not active made a number of trips to Viet Nam visiting each time a different small boat yard to view traditional boats being built. When John Doney, who headed that up, was lost in a car wreck the trips ended. The web site is still up and you may be able to get some information from some of the former members. The focus was on coastal boats. Another resource is a few of the French Admiral Francois-Edmund Paris' images from his three trips on early 19th century circumnavigations as a young officer. He was an incredible draftsman and artist and recorded indigenous craft from all over the globe. In 2011 the Boston Public Library supported the digitalization of the two volumes sponsored by the French government and printed in 1841 and they are on-line as PDFs, which can be downloaded here: http://archive.org/details/essaisurlaconstr02pris or you can Google "PDF Essai sur la Consturction Navale de Peuples Extra-Europeens ou Collection des Navires et Pirogues" [or something close to that]. Volume I is all text and Volume II is all illustrations.

    For some reason I'm not able to upload any images tonight so that will have to wait.

    Regards...Rob

  50. #250

    Default Re: Vietnamese boats

    Well, for some reason the page wouldn't accept image pasting the last time I tried but I see today that has changed, so I will paste some images from Admiral Paris's work, from the collection published in 1841 and now on-line as a PDF, downloadable by anyone. These are a few from the central coast of Viet Nam, made after his visit in the early 1830s...









    And this is the old Admiral himself in his later years:



    As mentioned in the previous posting you can access the entire 1841 publication in 2 volumes at the link given. Some of the indigenous craft that he documented will certainly amaze you, seeing how the challenges of making seaworthy watercraft were met by different peoples in the ages before easy communication.

    Warm regards....Rob

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