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Thread: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

  1. #1
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    Default Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I found an old sharpening stone still in its wrapper in some stuff from my dad's. It's a $6.00 double-sided stone from Vermont-American. Looks like it and others of its ilk are widely available. Anybody use these things? Is it an oilstone? The packaging keeps it a mystery.

    I've also got three waterstones of varying grits, but am curious on uses of the freebie odd man out stone.
    It will all be OK in the end...so if it's not OK, you're not at the end.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    It's probably an oil stone. Different grits. one side finer than the other. Use the coarser side first then finish up with the finer side. If its Vermont American I doubt its of very high quality. I don't think VA has ever sold waterstones.
    basil

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    It is a perfectly good stone for the first and second stages of sharpening. I use one in the kitchen all the time for my knives. They won't do much for a carving chisel or a plane. They work well on an axe.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Perfect for a shovel...

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I've been sharpening my planes and chisels on a similar stone for most of my life. It may very well be a VA since I acquired it in New England at least 40 years ago. One side appears to be 90 grit, the other 600. I'm able to get tools to just barely shaving sharp on it, and that's always been good enough for me. Any more than that doesn't last anyway. Diminishing returns.

    If you haven't already rendered it impervious with oil, as I have mine, you might give it a try with water. The function of the liquid is to flush away the metal and abrasive grit, keeping the stone from glazing over, which would make it useless. Water is cheaper, cleaner (I don't like introducing oil to my woodworking, it interferes with gluing and finishing), and since it's so easy to use more of it than of oil it flushes the surface better. The stone is probably quite absorbent, like a brick, so it will help if you store it in clean water, then the liquid applied to the surface when sharpening won't just be instantly absorbed. Don't let it freeze.

    Lee Valley has an oil stone listed that is 90/600 grit that I recommend, along with the same advice about water, to my customers when asked how to sharpen their own chisels and plane irons. No one has ever come back and said that it didn't work. To be fair, no one has ever told me that it did work either.

    If you choose to use the oil (oh won't you please try the water and let me know how it worked, before resorting to oil? It won't hurt the stone.), I have found that a mix of 3 parts kerosene and one part 30 weight motor oil works just fine. The reason I use that is that it's convenient, since I use it, in a pump type spray bottle, as a penetrating oil and lubricant on customer's gardening tools.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I use two double sided stones,one is a Japanese waterstone and is excellent.The other is a Norton India stone and would be good if I could just find the time to flatten it.It has one coarse side and the other side is a medium grit and my preferred lubricant is kerosene,no oil added,as this keeps the pores of the stone clear and facilitates more rapid cutting.An old stone that has never been used will require a good soak before use.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Perfect for a shovel...

    Actually it won't work well at all for a shovel. Shovels are tempered, so unless you've got all day to grind away at it it's not efficient. I use a 1" X 40" zirconia/alumina (blue) belt for shovels, hoes etc. The blue belts, which, by the way, work much better that aluminum oxide or garnets on epoxy, are available for belt sanders and disc grinders.

    If you choose to do a shovel, or anything else for that matter, with your belt sander watch out for the sparks igniting the wood dust in the tool.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Y Bar Ranch View Post
    I found an old sharpening stone still in its wrapper in some stuff from my dad's. It's a $6.00 double-sided stone from Vermont-American. Looks like it and others of its ilk are widely available. Anybody use these things? Is it an oilstone? The packaging keeps it a mystery.

    I've also got three waterstones of varying grits, but am curious on uses of the freebie odd man out stone.
    I use those things, I like them. Waterstones don't help to prevent rust.
    Use kerosene and light mineral oil to flush and lubricate the stone......these can be mixed (4:1) or applied seperately.
    You might want to build a little box for the stone to keep the oil in one place while you use it.

    Can be used to sharpen flat-edged (plane blades etc.) tools. It's what I use (and a strop) and the results are satisfactory......in other words I can not honestly attribute any faults in my workmanship to the sharpening system I use.

    If you really want to sharpen a shovel, use a file.
    We don't know how lucky we are....

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I've been using those stones regularly for nearly fifty years- have a small one in my pocket at the moment, used for sharpening the skinning knife on my belt. I never use the coarse side- keep your knives and tools "touched up" with a stone regularly- don't wait 'til you could ride to Bourke on 'em before sharpening For things that need a lot of work, like a new axe, I use a grinder and a bucket of water, then a wet grinder, then a fine stone, and I finish all my sharpening- from axes to pocket knives- by stropping the blade on the palm of my hand- works just as well as a leather strop. For new steel arrowheads I use a curved tooth auto body file. It can get a broadhead literally shaving sharp in under thirty seconds. (For the last ten years I've used only stone heads but that's another story). I also use purpose built round stones for axes, and tapered cylindrical stones for scythe blades. And water, not oil. By the way, the stones that I consider to be the best oil stones in the world come from a quarry in Arkansas- the material is novaculite. The second grade material knapps beautifully to make arrowheads and other stone tools. For the finest edge possible hone your blades on a sheet of glass- scary sharp JayInOz

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by gibetheridge View Post
    (oh won't you please try the water and let me know how it worked, before resorting to oil? It won't hurt the stone.)
    Thanks to all, I'm going to give it the water try tonight. It's a freebie, so no harm no foul if it doesn't work.
    It will all be OK in the end...so if it's not OK, you're not at the end.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    How to sharpen a shovel:
    When we were little, and digging dirt for jumps, we devised a way to sharpen shovels. Get two kids, the shovel needing sharpened, and a Stingray with a polo seat. I suppose it doesn't have to be a Stingray, but it must have a polo (or banana) seat with a strut. You cannot have a "sissy" bar of any appreciable height, but shocks do help. One kid sits on the bike facing forward, then pedals down the sidewalk like a dog is chasing him, while the other kid sits backward and applies pressure to the shovel blade. If you are a particularly chicken-armed little one, you can weight the head. It's really noisy and sparky, but it works pretty darn good.

    Now I use a boring old bastard file. I do have two kids and a Stingray, though, and some weights, cause the little one's chicken-armed, yet.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    We did that..but never thought to sharpen the shovel: we did it for the sparks.LOL
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    "Thanks to all, I'm going to give it the water try tonight. It's a freebie, so no harm no foul if it doesn't work."

    It'll work. My theory on why water stones work better is that the thinner the flushing fluid the closer the tool can get to the abrasive. Oil is a lubricant, it actually prevents abrasion, doesn't really make sense. Anyone know better? I'd like to hear it.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    OK, sharpened the cheap Stanley chisel nicely. Took a while to flatten the back of the chisel. Water works just fine. I'm using an old tennis ball container to keep the stone in. Perfect fit.

    I'll still use the waterstones for the good stuff.
    It will all be OK in the end...so if it's not OK, you're not at the end.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Thanks for the feedback.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by JayInOz View Post
    For the finest edge possible hone your blades on a sheet of glass- scary sharp JayInOz
    Any details on how to do this?
    www.schleiffboatworks.com "classic boats for modern times"

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by TimmS View Post
    Any details on how to do this?
    From the primordial ooze of the infancy of the internet:


    Message from discussion Sandpaper Sharpening
    View parsed - Show only message text

    From: laman...@u.washington.edu (Stephen LaMantia)
    Subject: Sandpaper Sharpening
    Date: 1995/11/01
    Message-ID: <477j5j$ij4@nntp4.u.washington.edu>
    X-Deja-AN: 118529682
    organization: University of Washington
    nntp-posting-user: lamantia
    newsgroups: rec.woodworking

    [No, you can't sharpen sandpaper. And please don't
    ask me how I know that.]

    [Required warnings:]

    [If you don't like sharpening tales, or sandpaper, or
    handplanes, or any deviation from simple declarative
    sentences, please don't read this post. Also, it's a
    process gloat, and it's windbaggy, so be forewarned.]

    [And if you prefer one-clause synopses, here: "I sharpened
    a plane blade with sandpaper." Now move along now.]

    For anyone else:

    I recently emailed a few folks about some attempts I made at
    sharpening a plane iron with sandpaper. Some suggested I post my
    story to the group. So here it is.

    (Rich and David, I've pretty much rehashed my email to you guys
    here, so you can move on out now, too.)

    Let's see. Who's left? Oh.

    Dear Mom,

    I've recently been experimenting with using sandpaper for honing.
    I had been getting tired out with the oilstones getting unflat and
    glazed and needing to be lapped all the time, tired of oil all over
    the place and on my hands so I couldn't even scratch, tired of
    having to clean the stones after each use, tired of having to keep
    a conscious effort going to distribute wear on the stones evenly.
    So tired of all of this.

    So I started thinking about abrasives and abrasive action in
    general, and read up a bit, and asked around, and found out that
    there's nothing different, in principle, between sandpaper and an
    oilstone. Silicon carbide sandpaper (i.e., wet-or-dry) goes up to
    600 grit in the hardware and woodworking stores, but up to 2000
    grit in the automotive finishing stores, as I learned from David
    Opincarne, a local rec.woodworker and admitted metalhead who works
    right here at the school and who sent me some 1200-and 2000-grit
    samples and who's recently been helping me greatly to understand
    the secrets of metal. For example, did you know that to produce
    high-carbon steel, crushed bone from the skull of an infidel is an
    excellent carburizing agent? Me, neither. Or that hardening the
    steel in cutting blades is achieved by the sudden and even cooling
    of the blade, and that the best known way to achieve these dual
    goals is to quench the blade in the still-living body of an enemy
    warrior? Same here; I had no idea. David's been teaching me a
    lot.

    Me and him and some other wreck.the.woodwork folks had been talking
    lately about this abrasive business, and it got onto sandpaper
    somehow, and so I decided to test something out. For the
    sharpening-with-sandpaper experiment, I used a slightly-pitted 2"
    wide jack plane blade that came with an old beat-up Stanley Bedrock
    #605 I bought last year at a tool swap. The bevel on the plane
    iron had been somehow ground *concave* by the previous owner (or
    else it just wore that way), so I first straightened the edge out
    on the grinding wheel, grinding in straight at first so as not to
    create a thin edge that would burn, and then grinding in a bevel
    but stopping a bit short of a real edge, again to prevent burning.
    Because of this care not to burn the steel, this grinding goes slow
    and light, but it's time well spent.

    Time now to lap the back behind the cutting bevel. I took a page
    out of the plane-sole lapping book -- figuratively speaking of
    course, you should never tear pages out of a book -- and used very
    light coatings of 3M "77" spray adhesive to temporarily glue small
    1-1/2" x 3-1/2" rectangular pieces of sandpaper along the edge of a
    sheet of 1/4" plate-glass. The paper I used was Aluminum Oxide in
    grits 50, 80, and 100, and Silicon Carbide (wet-or-dry to you
    laypeople) in grits of 150, 180, 220, 320, 400, 600, 1200, and
    2000. The plate glass was placed with its edge flush to the edge
    of the workbench.

    I lapped the end one inch of the back of the iron on each grit in
    turn. I didn't use any water; I just went at it dry. So as I
    lapped -- can you call it lapping if it's dry? -- anyway, about
    every ten seconds or so I'd stop and brush off the sandpaper with a
    whisk broom and wipe the blade off on my shirt. (On the coarser
    grits, I found that a dustbuster vacuum actually cleaned up the
    paper quite thoroughly, much better than sweeping it off, but this
    sucking advantage disappeared at around 220 grit.) Since I
    progressed through the grits so gradually, I found I had to spend
    only about a minute or so on each grit, including the suck-down and
    sweep-off and shirt-wipe time.

    One trick to efficiency is knowing when you've lapped the back
    sufficiently on each progressive grit. I had previously had
    trouble gauging this, and didn't know how to tell when enough is
    enough. Thanks to a clever suggestion from Jeff Gorman, I tried a
    trick that seemed to work wonderfully. I have a cheapie Radio
    Shack 30-power hand microscope -- "microscope" sounds impressive,
    but it's only $10, although I forget where I got it from -- and
    used that to tell when the striations from the new grit had
    replaced all the striations from the previous grit, and when they
    had, I stopped there and moved on to the next grit.

    About ten minutes after starting, I had gone from 50 grit on up to
    2000, and there was a mirror finish on the back of that iron the
    likes of which must be seen. The back of the iron became so shiny
    I could count my nose hairs in it; 98 on the left, 79 on the right,
    but 109 and 85 if you count the white ones.

    I then jigged the blade in a Veritas honing jig -- which, by the
    way, Mr. Lee, should be called a honing fixture, not a jig, since a
    jig's for holding a tool and a fixture's for holding a workpiece
    and in the sharpening operation the plane iron, while usually
    thought of as a tool, or as a part of one, is actually in this
    instance the workpiece -- man, near-terminal digression there,
    almost lost it for good; Boy, snap out of it! -- I clamped the
    blade down in the Veritas blade-holder device, taking care to have
    the hollow-ground bevel resting on the glass perfectly along both
    edges of the hollow grind. I then adjusted the microbevel cam on
    the jig up to its full two-degree microbevel setting -- Robin, tell
    your uncle that Steve said "way to go, old dude" -- and honed away
    on the 2000-grit. Even though I had not ground a sharp edge on the
    primary bevel with the bench grinder, even on that little slip of
    fine 2000 grit it still took only about another couple of minutes
    before I had a nice sharp little 1/64" microbevel gleaming back at
    me.

    I flipped the blade over on the sandpaper several times, hone and
    lap, hone and lap, each time gentler and gentler, to remove the
    little bit of wire edge. (Which, by the way, as a result of using
    such a fine grit must have been so tiny that it was very hard to
    see or feel, so pretty much just from my awareness of the process I
    assumed it was there.)

    The resulting little thin secondary bevel was shiny. I mean
    *clean* shiny, like nothing I'd ever seen before. Unlike the
    secondary bevels I'd previously coaxed out of my hard white
    Arkansas stone, this one was unbelievably Shiny with a capital S.
    I mean *clean* shiny, like nothing I'd ever seen before. Oh, I
    said that already. Okay, it's hard to describe; about the best I
    can do is to say that it looked almost *liquid* when you catch the
    light on it just right. I mean, it was so darn clean and shiny
    that it takes ten lines just to say it was so shiny it's hard to
    describe.

    Of course, shine is not the ultimate goal. But sharpness *is*.
    Still, they equate. The more shiny, the more uniform the surface
    is microscopically, and the closer to the geometric ideal of a
    *line* is the edge, and hence the sharper it is. Cool. I mean
    *COOL*!!! I was trembling in my Mickey Mouse boots in anticipation.................
    Steve Martinsen

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    continued from above



    Hell, this cutting edge looked downright *dangerous*! I didn't
    dare touch it. But yet, there was still something I just *had* to
    try.

    I removed the blade from the jig, and anxiously tried the old
    cliche "cut a finger off before you can notice and bleed all over
    your screaming wife in the car on the way to the hospital" test.
    Oops; no, wait. Sorry, that's the wrong test, for those other
    kinds of tools. Sorry. For the Neanderthals, it's the "shave some
    arm hairs off" test. Now I've done this test before, on other
    blades sharpened up on white Arkansas, and while these other blades
    would pop *some* hairs off the back of my wrist, many other hairs
    would just bend on over down under the blade's edge (probably from
    the sheer weight of four prepositions in a row), and those hairs
    that *did* pop off would do so quite painfully, as though the blade
    was more grabbing the hairs and *ripping* them out, and I could
    feel every one of them offering their stubborn and vengeful
    resistance. Not much fun, and nothing to be doing voluntarily in
    front of others.

    But the edge on this blade was something else! Not only did it cut
    off every little hair in its path with total ease, but it didn't
    hurt at all. In fact, I couldn't feel a thing; for all I could
    tell, there were no hairs there in its path to begin with. But of
    course there were many, since I'm Italian and also since I could
    see the fallen hairs all over the back of the blade. And my arm
    where I had shaved it was a smooth as a non-Italian baby's butt.
    Again, man, this had gotten downright *frightening*.

    But of course, the ultimate test of a plane iron's sharpness is
    what it does on wood. So I put the blade back into the plane, that
    old early-model Bedrock jack, which I've not yet tuned in any way.
    I tried it on the edge of a piece of pine, and as I adjusted the
    blade for the finest cut possible, it glided through the wood with
    no effort. None whatsoever. In fact, it almost seemed like the
    plane was pulling itself along, or that the wood was *wanting* to
    be planed and was throwing itself into the blade -- no, I've not
    read Krenov -- it took that little effort.

    I ended up getting a shaving that was so darn thin I could read
    newsprint through it easily. Unbelievably easily. So easily, in
    fact, that I thought for a moment about taking the iron back on out
    of the plane and putting the shaving over the shiny part of its
    back and counting my nose hairs again, but by this time I had grown
    weary of counting nose hairs, and of my concerned wife repeatedly
    asking me why I was doing that.

    I thought, no way, this can't be! So skeptic that I am -- I'm so
    skeptical, that I can't be fully sure that I'm really that much of a
    skeptic -- I put a micrometer to the shaving, and get this: it
    measured .0004 thick! Four ten-thousandths of an inch! (Or, as my
    eternally-pestered but forever-patient metalmentor David Opincarne
    showed me, "four-tenths" in machinist talk.) No, I read the mike
    right. Less than one half way to the very first line after zero.
    Man! That's a cubic hair less than one-half of a thousandth of an
    inch! Incredible! Amazing!

    And it just gets better. For a while there, I actually thought I
    had taken off another shaving that was even thinner, one so thin in
    fact that it was invisible and of no measurable mass. I'm pretty
    sure I did, actually, but I'm having a hard time trying to think of
    a way to check this out, or even to find the spot on the ceiling
    that it floated up to.

    And what about the planed wood itself? Well, the surface the plane
    iron left on the wood in indescribable! It's like glass! No, it's
    like glass wet down with water and a tad of liquid soap added and
    then some Slick-50 and then frozen and polished. And this is on
    pine, a softwood! Not only that, but I then gave it the torture
    test: end grain. I put the same piece of wood in my shooting
    board, and had a go at the endgrain. Man oh man, I've never seen
    such a smooth surface on *endgrain* in my life. And again, this is
    on *pine*! The endgrain was almost as smooth as the edgegrain!
    This has gotten good!

    Still, having exclaimed all this, I'm making no claims to the
    throne of King of the Neanderthals. I'm the first to admit that
    this was kind of like when I was a kid and one year I batted a
    thousand in the Kiwanis Grasshoppers when I was really four years
    too young to actually play in the league but it was the last game
    of the year and Dad the team manager put me up in a losing game as
    the last batter just for the novelty of it and to stop my pestering
    -- he figured I'd get beaned and would shut up for a while -- and
    the opposing pitcher Terry Crowley the hotshot star started
    laughing at me because I was so scrawny and tiny and he taunted me
    who's this, Mickey Mantle or something, and he threw a pitch at my
    crutch and I just shut my eyes and said a curse and swung and
    slammed a hard grounder right down the line and under the legs of
    the first baseman 20 some odd years before Bill Buckner got his
    chance and I got a hit. I know it was kind of like that, because
    this shaving wasn't the minimum three feet long as per the Rules
    for the Contest to Become the King of the Neanderthals, so it
    shouldn't qualify. But it still feels just as nice.

    One more good thing is that in the process of taking this plane
    iron from misshapen funkiness to terrifying sharpness I used up all
    of about 25 cents worth of sandpaper, and probably about 3 cents
    worth of spray glue, and about fifteen or so minutes of my time,
    twenty if you stop for a nosehair count. When it was all done, I
    peeled the sandpaper from the glass and threw it away -- well,
    actually I could have but in truth I stick them together back-to-
    back and save them in a "used-sandpaper" box for odd tasks that
    never come up. I then scraped the little bit of residual adhesive
    from the glass with a razor blade, a quick wipedown with acetone on
    a piece of paper towel, and the cleanup was done in a minute. No
    oil, no water, no mess, no glaze or flatness problems to worry
    about, and a cutting edge that is Scary-Sharp (tm).

    I think I'll still keep my stones, though; they can sit atop the
    packets of sandpaper to help keep them flat.

    -- Steve LaMantia [I'm talking about my oilstones.]
    Seattle, WA
    Steve Martinsen

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Here is a link where Nicholas Carey provides some more info about the origins of ScarySharp(tm).

    http://www.woodbutcher.net/scary-origins.shtml



    Perhaps he could elucidate us a bit more
    Steve Martinsen

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I've been using kerosene /oil and a double sided Norton stone for ever but finishing off with a VERY hard oil stone Dad left me .I have no idea what it is , but it's great .It finishs a blade beautifully .


    Shovels get an 80 grit disc on the angle grinder and they're grateful !
    Try to work out what the marketing guy wants you to do then do precisely the opposite.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    When I worked fire crew for CDF shovels were carefully done on a grinder and then finished with a file. Their edges taped till they were needed. They got regular touchups on the line with a file and handed back in regularly for a re-grind.
    Shovels aren't just for digging holes!

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    They are around here , long handle , narrow and sharp .I've worn one away completely !
    Try to work out what the marketing guy wants you to do then do precisely the opposite.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    That's the problem around Byron, lots of rainbows, so you have to keep digging for the pot of gold!

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Yep, I've been using water for sharpening chisels and plane blades for 20 years and it works fine. It should go without saying that rust can be a problem if you don't wipe them really dry.
    However, if you value your time, you might consider one of those synthetic diamond hones. The old-fashioned stones cut much more slowly and have a nasty habit of developing ruts where you use them the most, and that makes it really hard to get a flat bevel on the cutter. For those who prefer a hollow bevel it is almost impossible if the surface of the stone is not absolutely flat.

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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    For the heck of it, I went to Ace Hardware and picked up a piece of 6"x12" glass, silicon carbide sandpaper at 220, 400, and 1500 grit (what they had) and some 3M 77 spray glue. I glued the sandpaper to the glass, will be trying it out tomorrow.
    It will all be OK in the end...so if it's not OK, you're not at the end.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Y Bar Ranch View Post
    For the heck of it, I went to Ace Hardware and picked up a piece of 6"x12" glass, silicon carbide sandpaper at 220, 400, and 1500 grit (what they had) and some 3M 77 spray glue. I glued the sandpaper to the glass, will be trying it out tomorrow.
    Lower right stored in kerosene is a large, double-grit Norton carborundum stone similar to your Vermont-American. It serves as my coarse stone. You can use any of the oil stones shown below....carborundum, India or Arkansas....with water as a lubricant without damage. All the lube does is float off the steel dust so it doesn't clog the stone. What oil, kerosene or mineral spirits does that water doesn't is slow down the wear on the stone and save some fuss over insuring your blades are dry and oiled before putting them away....at the expense of slightly slower sharpening than with water.



    Sandpaper works fine for sharpening if you don't mind the expense, as it doesn't last long abrading tool steel. If there is any secrets remaining in sharpening it's in the stropping. Use a 2hp, 8", 1900rpm buffer shown below with a stitched muslin or felt wheel and green rouge, and you can sharpen on a cinder block and still achieve a superior edge. Hard felt wheels like the one hanging on the buffer stand burn steel easily and I relegate mine to High-speed Steel lathe tools.



    Last edited by Bob Smalser; 07-11-2010 at 10:52 AM.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Allison View Post
    Shovels aren't just for digging holes!
    May I ask what else you use them for?
    www.schleiffboatworks.com "classic boats for modern times"

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Barkin' trees, separating rattlesnakes from their fangholders, flushing for the dog...

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I've been fooling around using a cheap-o Stanley chisel as my test case, and by "flat bottom" I guess they mean "except for all those littles waves". Either that, or I've turned into some OCD freak who has to keep rubbing and rubbing and rubbing on the stone until I have no more chisel. Ack. I have a 10 year old, for whom I'm trying to convince standing over a sharpening stone and rubbing a chisel is one of life's great thrills.

    The plane has come out nicely...
    It will all be OK in the end...so if it's not OK, you're not at the end.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    Oil is a lubricant, it actually prevents abrasion, doesn't really make sense. Anyone know better? I'd like to hear it.
    I work at one of the biggest beef packing plants in the States...we use 3 stones lubed with food grade white oil (mineral oil). Seems to me that seeing as bad cuts = lost money...they would go with the most efficient thing possible. These folks keep their knives atom splitting sharp.
    Steve Lewis
    Formerly Lewisboats (don't try to change your email address!)

    http://angelfire.com/ego/lewisboatworks

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I keep my kitchen knives very sharp but when my wife washes them she needs to scrub the edge along with the rest of the blade with a brush. So when I pick up a knife I reach for my sharpening stone cause sure as shootin that blade will skid on an onion skin.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    TimmS,

    May I ask what else you use them for?
    On a fire line shovels are kept sharp so that they can be used like a scythe to cut the thin brush and branches that the guys with the pulaskis don't bother with. You cut roots and dig away suface material to get material burning underneath that can cause a fire to spring back up later. And they are used to scrape clean down to bare earth to complete the fire line. A very versatile tool if sharp!
    Last edited by Allison; 07-13-2010 at 04:10 AM.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    I'm able to sharpen chisels nicely, but have been struggling a bit with the plane iron. The bevel is small, so I have difficulty in holding it at the right angle by hand. Just ordered a honing guide from Amazon, which will hopefully hold things right. Figure I'll get the freehand down in time.
    It will all be OK in the end...so if it's not OK, you're not at the end.

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Double-sided sharpening stone...How to use?

    OK, got the honing guide via Amazon.com, and used it on the plane iron. I'm set up with the scary sharp method. I flattened off the back some more, although it is a cheap plane, so one corner of the edge simply won't get touched. The rest is almost mirror-ish.

    Flipped it over and fiddled around trying to get the right angle in the honing guide. Ended up marking the bevel with Sharpie marker and iterating a little until I had just enough angle. Then back and forth on the rough paper, the medium, and the fine. I was able to shave hairs off the forearm, although there was a little pulling going on. Cutting through the cedar for my stripper kayak nicely. Cool!
    It will all be OK in the end...so if it's not OK, you're not at the end.

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