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Thread: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

  1. #1
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    Default Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    My dad would like to get a newer truck to haul his Kubota tractor. He currently has a 1994 Ford 4X4 F250 with (I believe) a 5.8 V8. The trailer and tractor weigh about 10,000 lbs total (maybe a bit less). It's a brand new trailer (dual axel, good brakes), and a medium sized tractor.

    The F250 has a big rear end (perhaps upgraded) and from a suspension and brake standpoint seems to do the job ok. IE the trailer handles ok and the tail doesn't wag the dog. Recently after a longer trip, the transmission (4 speed auto) got hot and blew fluid out the dipstick. It seems ok now, but in general the engine doesn't seem to have enough power, and the trans is only just up to the job.

    I believe he has about $4000 into the F250.

    He is looking to put about $8k total into a new truck that will do the job. Diesel would be nice, 4x4 is essential. The longest trip would be 150 miles, most much shorter (40 miles or so, up VT roads)

    What make, model, age, etc would you recommend?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    That 250 will do just fine. I've towed twice that with my 150 2wd 6 cyl.
    Ofcourse...... I didn't try to haul that up Moss Hollow rd....

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    A lady driving one of those at 55 miles per hour with her foot on the gas impacted my New Buick Regal at a stop light....she kept going...and was fighting with her kids,,,,my car was thrown 28 feet thru the air, over a newly cut drainage ditch, impacted nose down totally destroyed the car, I was unconscious for 30 minutes or so while they cut the car apart to get me out....she had the paint messed up a bit on her front bumper. They still drive the same truck, 8 years later.
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    I got hit by a lady driving a big mid eighties four door buick, while I was in my Silverado extended cab Z71. My truck had a 4" body lift on it. She was drunk and ran a red light going an estimated 50 mph and hit me just forward of the driver's side door so hard it threw the transfer case out of my truck about a 100 feet down the road. I walked away unhurt - she had a broken pelvis, punctured lung and a broken jaw.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Noah, I loved my 2500 four door 4x4 Duramax for towing my tractor and trailer almost identical in weight to what you're talking about. But you ain't gonna find a good one for 10 grand. Chevy (and GMC) made an HD1500 that came with a 6.0 liter gas engine that was set up for towing. Its capacity from the factory is a little over 10,000 pounds, the HD 2500 tow 16,000. You might look at one of these.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    I drive a 2004 F-250 crew cab [ 4 door].
    It came from the factory ready to tow 13,000 lbs.I only need to install a very heavy duty trailer hitch as the step and tow bumper obviously isn't tough enough.
    It has a 5.4 liter and i drive it with respect and I get 16 miles to the gallon. It sits up so high that the only thing i worry about is full tractor trailers,If I hit anything or it hits me I might get a scratch ..most cars will go under it and it has the basic standard suspension.The only thing I have added is I put in a " Detroit Locker " [locking axles] 83,000 milles and it looks brand new...
    It will be going into my garage for most of the summer as my Austin Healey should be ready to drive soon [ 1959 bug eye sprite]
    I am really happy with this truck,I have owned it since new...Nice dependable and safe [it cost alot !! with the detroit locker it was 40K]
    RIPLEY

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Ford powerstroke (always makes me feel a little dirty to say that) turbodiesels of either 7.2 or the more recent 6.0 and 6.4 litre displacements should be quite good, although the early 6.0 turbodiesels had a rep for stretching their headbolts and popping head gaskets. 7.2 seems dead nuts reliable, see some of Bob Smalse's posts regarding. Dodge Cummins turbodiesels of any vintage should be ok also. IIRC the early GMC Duramax engines cracked blocks under load and all can burn out a tranny fairly quickly. I change the oil in mine (the Tranny) on a very regular basis. How often would he be towing the tractor? If not that often, the big V10 from Dodge is tremendously powerful (I've driven them, nice rush), as are the V 10 Ford and 454 chevy (owned one of those, too - fun) at the cost of abysmal mileage. For occasional use,one of those might be an acceptable choice.
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    I'd be more interested in the brakes on the trailer .Getting the thing moving isn't hard , stopping it all in a line ,right side up sometimes can be .
    Try to work out what the marketing guy wants you to do then do precisely the opposite.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    You aren't going to get much improvement for $8K. Go up to $12K and you'll do better.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    the 7.2 turbo is a navistar engine.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by The549 View Post
    the 7.2 turbo is a navistar engine.

    Or even the 7.3 liter.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    I'll probably get flamed for this by Ford owners, but what the hell...

    A good friend of mine had a series of automatic Ford F250's - 2WD & 4WD - that he used to pull a dual axle trailer loaded with a bit of everything up to around three to four tons. He mostly used it on short trips around metro Toronto and its suburbs, with three or four trips annually between Toronto and Charlottetown, PEI. Invariably, each truck had its transmission overheat and eat itself. Even the two with transmission coolers installed. All were gasoline engines. Turned me away from any warm and fuzzy feelings I had for Ford trucks.

    Just sayin'...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    I'll probably get flamed for this by Ford owners, but what the hell...

    A good friend of mine had a series of automatic Ford F250's - 2WD & 4WD - that he used to pull a dual axle trailer loaded with a bit of everything up to around three to four tons. He mostly used it on short trips around metro Toronto and its suburbs, with three or four trips annually between Toronto and Charlottetown, PEI. Invariably, each truck had its transmission overheat and eat itself. Even the two with transmission coolers installed. All were gasoline engines. Turned me away from any warm and fuzzy feelings I had for Ford trucks.

    Just sayin'...
    For this reason, on any brand of truck, I personally prefer a good manual trans, provided it is properly geared, i.e., a granny gear for starting out to save wear on the clutch. A manual trans doesn't throw heat into the cooling system like an automatic, and will always outlast an auto. And by granny gear I mean low enough so that on level ground you can let the clutch out at idle and it'll pull, though it also helps if it's a diesel. (In fact, that is the proper procedure according to the book on the truck I drove.) Diesel, and a wide ratio six-speed box with granny low and a tall top for good mileage, and you have a good setup, in my opinion. With the economy down, there are a lot of excellent medium duty trucks on the market cheap, the buyer may want to look there as well.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    My 1993 Dodge with the aid of a 12-valve Cumins Diesel was rated for 16000 lbs towing right out of the box, and would have no problem handling 10000-lbs today. And that is with an old automatic tranny.

    Get the stick version for serious towing.

    Moby Nick

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Manual trannies last longer? Sure.

    But costwise, it's a choice between replacing a clutch and replacing an automatic tranny with a rebuild. About the same labor is required for each if you do the clutch from beneath. A rebuilt Ford automatic costs more but also should last 2X+ longer than a clutch.

    And with this economy, in a short tour around here and I can show you several serious F250's and 350's with 400k or more miles running their original diesels and automatics. I can also show you those whose didn't last 100k miles. The difference is generally the operator. And the job.
    Last edited by Bob Smalser; 05-15-2010 at 07:28 PM.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    You can easily pick up a clean first gen Dodge/Cummins truck that will do this job handily. Personally, I've always been pretty fond of straight sixes, and the Cummins is a 360 CID straight six diesel, and the first gen ones are all non-computerized, old school engines.

    I'm not all that fond of automatic transmissions, but I have to admit that the Getrag five speed that came with my truck did not last past 200k, and so I replaced it with a later model New Venture 5 speed instead, a much beefier unit.

    I don't think there's a better, more durable and reliable diesel engine in light trucks than the early 12 valve Cummins.

    And they are out there, in the price range you're looking for.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    So, Bob and Woodrat, what are my options should my Dodge 250 auto tranny fail to tow my boat?

    I have not real idea what the tranny that came with the truck is capable of.

    I once helped a friend tow a boat like mine from New Hampshire to Michigan and he really preffered the stick tranny in his Dodge 250 Cunmins over an automatic.

    I personally like automatics for towing and for boat ramps, but my loads will certainly increase if my wife and I go for a fifth wheel recreational trailer.

    Does Dodge have any trannies that compare with the Allison in a GMC or Chevy pickup with the Duramax Diesel?

    As for clutch wear, I used to drive a lot of stick-shift automobiles, and it was only the throwout bearings that usually needed replacement.

    Moby Nick

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    If you don't have it, strongly suggest you consider an auxiliary transmission fluid cooler. If it has been mentioned, my apologies. If this is the main use of the vehicle, it may be cheapest to just put on a smaller diameter tire for extra torque, rather than messing with a bigger engine, different rear end, etc.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    I do have to admit that the Allison auto that is going in the GM one tons is supposed to be a pretty heavy duty trans. If you have to do a lot of stop-and-go, or a lot of steep uphill starts where a manual would be more nerve-wracking, a heavy auto may be the way to go, versus clutch replacement costs. But if most of your driving is highway, a clutch will often last the life of the vehicle. Remember something: Almost all clutch wear occurs when starting from a dead stop. Once you are moving, there is almost no clutch wear when changing gears, if you know how to drive. A low granny gear greatly reduces clutch wear. I start out in granny at every stop because of this, engage at idle just like the book says, then give it some throttle, when others would start out in 2nd gear and have to give it more throttle and let it slip. That is also why, in mountainous Europe, the cars there are geared different (better) than here in the US, with a lower 1st, not quite a granny gear but lower than cars in the US.

    In order for a conventional automatic to work, there must be some slippage. This is why some automatics on heavy trucks are not conventional automatics, they are actually manual transmission with solenoids to shift gears and handle the clutch work, with a lot of computer brainpower making things work. Because a well-designed constant-mesh transmission is inherently more durable than a planetary gear trans that has friction bands, which slip, even when new, and a torque converter (fluid coupling), which, while very neat, does generate heat. That is why there has been so much durability issues with continuously variable transmissions; take all the problems with automatics, and increase by an order of magnitude.

    So, to summarize, what kind of driving do you do?
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Your dad can add a transmission cooler in front of the radiator. I added one to every vehicle I have used for towing. Makes a big difference. My brother added air bags to the rear of his F-250. The system has a compressor and a dash guage and switch. You can pump up the rear for towing and deflate for normal driving. Works very well.
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Nicholas;

    I can only really speak to the manual transmission Dodge trucks, but what I have is a 1992 Dodge heavy 3/4 ton (same rear end and brakes as a one ton).

    It came with a factory 5 speed, which was a Getrag. Mine started popping out of gear around 200k, and when I looked into rebuilding it, it was going to be very expensive to rebuild at that time, around $2200. Parts were expensive and most shops didn't want to mess with it.

    So I went online and bought a rebuilt New Venture 4500 transmission from Standard Transmission in Texas. It came as a complete kit to replace the Getrag, with a bellhousing, mounts and new clutch kit. I paid a shop to install it and the total cost including installation was $3000. I don't expect that I will need to worry about this transmission for a very long time.

    The Standard Transmission version came with a couple of improved parts as well; the original NV4500 apparently had a problem with fifth gear stripping off the inadequate splines on its shaft and the transmission I got from them has an improved shaft for that gear in it. You can also now get rebuild parts for the Getrag much more reasonably from ST, too ( http://www.standardtransmission.com/ )

    You can also join this forum ( http://www.dieseltruckresource.com/dev/index.php ) where you will find a very helpful community of Dodge/Cummins folks, and really good technical threads. There's a LOT of info in there about the auto transmissions, towing, and improving your transmission.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianW View Post
    Or even the 7.3 liter.
    yikes. maybe my mistake caused the thing to quit on me in napa county!

    Sounds like love to my ears...

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    I'll probably get flamed for this by Ford owners, but what the hell...

    A good friend of mine had a series of automatic Ford F250's - 2WD & 4WD - that he used to pull a dual axle trailer loaded with a bit of everything up to around three to four tons. He mostly used it on short trips around metro Toronto and its suburbs, with three or four trips annually between Toronto and Charlottetown, PEI. Invariably, each truck had its transmission overheat and eat itself. Even the two with transmission coolers installed. All were gasoline engines. Turned me away from any warm and fuzzy feelings I had for Ford trucks.

    Just sayin'...
    Any have a manual? A car tuner told me the manual trannys on ford trucks (idk if gas and diesels are different) are a necessary option, that I should replace mine whenever the auto inevitably quits.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by The549 View Post
    Any have a manual? A car tuner told me the manual trannys on ford trucks (idk if gas and diesels are different) are a necessary option, that I should replace mine whenever the auto inevitably quits.
    335K on the 1998 F150 with the small V8 and an auto gear box. Change the fluid & filter every year, keep it cool. Knock on linoleum, no tranny service needed to date.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    I have an F-250 with the 7.3 liter engine, and I would be very cautious about anything weighing more than five or six thousand pounds. iirc the 7.3 is the largest engine Ford puts in a truck like mine, but it's the rear end and all that makes the difference between a 250 and something like a 550. I have a friend at work who hauls cattle and horses all the time. He has a 550. I am not sure a 'regular' 250 would do it.

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  26. #26
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    DODGE! My 2005 Dakota, a midsize, tows my Parker 23 which bulks out at around 6,000 lbs on trailer without even breathing hard. My previous two Dodge trucks, a 1989 V-6 Dakota, and a 1990 Van with the BFE 360 V-8 towed even heavier stuff. All automatics - `89 sold with ~140K and `90 sold ~135K with the original trannys intract.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    My Dodge has a Dana 70 rear axle, and I've towed 7k+ regularly with it for the last 80k miles with no issues. I towed home a load of lumber from 250 miles away that I later (doh!) calculated at around 10k, and I towed a load of black locust timbers about 600 miles and that was an easy 8k load. This truck has been a very good towing rig for me, for 7 years now.

    I do know that when I was living in northern CA, where Powerstroke Fords were everywhere, the parts guy told me that the corporate rear axles in the Fords were not holding up and coming apart all the time. I was standing there when another customer brought in a pile of gear pieces wrapped in a rag that came out of his late 90's Ford 1 ton.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Once owned an '82 F250, 351 W c/w T18A 4spd, 3.56 gearing. This truck WORKED, I worked in marine repair at the time and was known to carry in excess of 8000 lbs cargo and towed a fifth wheel trailer with a gross weight of over 30,000 lbs with no difficulty. This truck served me for 9 years of such use and I ended up trading the machine on another vehicle. By the way, the clutch was never replaced, only adjusted during that time, I would allow there was very little lining left !! Given my druthers, I would build myself another F250 or 350 (single wheel) with an old school Cummins and king pins rather than ball joints. Diesels are wonderful workhorses, however, most consumers have no need, a major cause of early engine failure is due to "short cycling" : a diesel is meant to be started and worked steady for extended periods, not drive short distances shut down restart and repeat. Suppose I'm fortunate in that I can build exactly the machine I want, was never scared to "mix and match".

    Hope that further muddies up the waters for you


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  29. #29
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    yeah, I've never been a huge Ford fan, but the body and interiors on 1990's era Fords sure are nicer and more durable than my Dodge. Dodge put a 500,000+ mile diesel engine in 100,000 mile truck body.

    If I got to build the truck of my dreams, I would take the drivetrain that I have now and put it in a late 60's crew cab Dodge, or a 80's-90's Ford.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Surprised not to hear the words Power Wagon

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    In the interests of fair play, I've yet to find an older Ford F-Series in the price range mentioned that has a front end that lasts much more than 100k miles. A real weak spot.

    And while Dodge of whatever vintage (I still have a '53 M37) always seems to use a good engine-tranny, some of their recent diesels are noisy to the limits of tolerance.

    Plus short of a Pete, Kenworth or Freightliner, regular trailer loads that weigh more than the prime mover merit special consideration. While I've towed more than 10k with my various F250HD's in a pinch when my Pete was unavailable, if I were shopping I'd be looking at F350's and up.
    Last edited by Bob Smalser; 05-16-2010 at 12:33 PM.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Smalser View Post
    Plus short of a Pete, Kenworth or Freightliner, regular trailer loads that weigh more than the prime mover merit special consideration. While I've towed more than 10k with my various F250HD's in a pinch when my Pete was unavailable, if I were shopping I'd be looking at F350's and up.
    Agreed. Regardless of whether or not a 250 will do it, the 350 is definitely the better match with continuous duty. First thing that came to mind when I opened this thread.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    No reason to stop at the F350. That is just the last truck up the line that Ford actively markets to the public. A F450 dually drives just like a 350.

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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Hi Noah -

    I used an 89 F250 351 Windsor & 3 speed auto (with probably the same 1 ton tear your dad's truck has) to haul my tractor for years. I think my weight was more like 9,000 (6 tractor & 2-3 trailer), but I bet yours is similar. Mine's a 40HP 4WD - so I'll guess your dad's isn't much bigger?

    Anyway - my Ford had a transmission cooler & that made a big difference. 75 mph all the way to Mid-coast Maine with no problem. Up over the ApGap - no problem (though no speed records were set doing that;-). I now have an 04 Chevy 2500HD with the 6 liter & 4 sp. auto. Hauls it with ease. A lot more civilized than the Ford too...

    If going for a new (to you) truck - I would not consider a 1/2 ton for this; 3/4 ton or better. Yes diesel is nice, but seems to add several thousand to the price. A couple of years ago (when gas was 4+ per gal), pickups like this were cheap & for once my timing was good, so I was able to find a great deal on the Chevy. Prices have come back up & I'm afraid that trucks in the price range you mention will be rust buckets around here.

    If your dad's truck is in decent shape body-wise, I think you may be best off adding a transmission cooler (& engine oil cooler if you don't have one) - as several posts above mention.

    And - as others have mentioned also - make sure the electric brakes on the trailer are working well. Not only do they keep you from hitting things, they keep the trailer from saying "My turn to go first!".

    Feel free to call me if you have specific/more questions (Lawrence has my # - or PM me for it). I've spent a lot of years in the automotive field.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianM View Post
    A boat transport company I hired to move my boat to and from San Diego used a pretty young Dodge 1500 (yes, half ton) w/FWD to pull my 11,000 lb boat + trailer (at least 2500lbs) up and over the Grapevine (4160 ft elevation) to Bay Area.

    The Dodge was rated at 9000lb towing weight. He was over his rating by at least 4500lbs....

    I was not pleased at this stunt but he made it safely.

    I have not idea what the condition was of his Auto Trans, nor Brakes after all the dust settled.

    Lesson learned.. Dodge rates their trucks very conservatively...
    Lesson Learned: There's a fool born every minute.

    There are a host of good reasons why there's an old saying in the Army that goes, "never tow like with like".

  36. #36
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Funny this came up today - my Dad just called to tell me he purchased a new to him truck. There were 3 in the running.

    1995 Ford F-350 Dually w 4wd and a 454. Very good condition, sold before we could make an offer.

    Ford F-350 with the 7.3 diesel. Good price, but something about it didn't feel right so he passed.

    Today he purchased a very good condition 1998 dodge 2500 4x4 SLT quad cab long bed with a 12 valve Cummins & 5 spd standard trans. It has new: Starter, batteries, front end components, muffler, clutch and TO bearing, 5th gear upgrade (the correct one), radiator, AC condenser & steering box.

    Probably a bit lighter suspension than the Ford with the heavy duty rear, but plenty of engine (215hp, 440lb ft torque. Hopefully it does the job. The truck was clearly well maintained by the PO, so that's a good sign. I was a bit skeptical about a Dodge, but I think it will do just fine.

  37. #37
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    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Noah View Post
    Funny this came up today - my Dad just called to tell me he purchased a new to him truck. There were 3 in the running.

    1995 Ford F-350 Dually w 4wd and a 454. Very good condition, sold before we could make an offer.

    Ford F-350 with the 7.3 diesel. Good price, but something about it didn't feel right so he passed.

    Today he purchased a very good condition 1998 dodge 2500 4x4 SLT quad cab long bed with a 12 valve Cummins & 5 spd standard trans. It has new: Starter, batteries, front end components, muffler, clutch and TO bearing, 5th gear upgrade (the correct one), radiator, AC condenser & steering box.

    Probably a bit lighter suspension than the Ford with the heavy duty rear, but plenty of engine (215hp, 440lb ft torque. Hopefully it does the job. The truck was clearly well maintained by the PO, so that's a good sign. I was a bit skeptical about a Dodge, but I think it will do just fine.
    If the driveshaft & rear end can handle the Cummins, I bet it'll tow just fine. Had a 99 that had unbelievable torque!

    Hope it's not too rusty. Get it oil undercoated ASAP.
    Last edited by Garret; 06-24-2010 at 04:10 PM. Reason: Egad - had "to" when it shoulda been "too"!

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    9,268

    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    There are a host of good reasons why there's an old saying in the Army that goes, "never tow like with like".
    How does an 18,000 lb Peterbilt tow 80,000lbs all day long day in and day out?
    (It's the configuration of the hitch and the ability to brake the trailer. These can be overcome with a simple fifth wheel arrangement and proper brakes on the trailer, and even with a ball hitch a similar disparity can be succesfull).

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    We have a 2001 K2500 4x4 Suburban with the then available 8.1L big block(gas)- IIRC it's rated to 13,000 lbs. I've towed some heavy stuff and never came close to maxing out the drive train.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Seabeck, WA
    Posts
    9,982

    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    How does an 18,000 lb Peterbilt tow 80,000lbs all day long day in and day out?
    (It's the configuration of the hitch and the ability to brake the trailer. These can be overcome with a simple fifth wheel arrangement and proper brakes on the trailer, and even with a ball hitch a similar disparity can be succesfull).
    In theory perhaps.

    In practice, there is absolutely zero comparison between the safety features of air brake cans on a tractor engineered to handle an 80k lb load and the combination of electric boat trailer brakes and a light-duty pickup, where something as simple as a bad trailer ground (think corrosion) can run you off the road.
    Last edited by Bob Smalser; 06-24-2010 at 05:05 PM.

  41. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    12,325

    Default Re: Let's talk trucks for towing - 10,000lb trailer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Smalser View Post
    In theory perhaps.

    In practice, there is absolutely zero comparison between the safety features of air brake cans on a tractor engineered to handle an 80k lb load and the combination of electric boat trailer brakes and a light-duty pickup, where something as simple as a bad trailer ground (think corrosion) can run you off the road.
    No argument, but...

    1) this isn't a boat trailer - it's a flatbed - so it won't be getting immersed in water

    2) I know I, when first taking off with my electric braked trailer, use the brake controller to apply just the trailer brakes. It they won't stop the truck, I stop & find out why before leaving my driveway. Anyone using a trailer should do something like this, as well as (one of my big pet peeves) do a walkaround with the taillights & 4 ways on to make sure all lights are working.

    3) Repeat # 2 as needed (at least every time things are hooked up again & preferably more often). I'll even apply the trailer brakes every 1/2 hour or so while driving, just so I know.

    Finally, a truck should never have it's towing capacity exceeded - just the same as load capacity.

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