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Thread: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

  1. #1201
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    I suggest a dinghy.

    Rick
    That'd be nice but the one I'd like to build would need a few more tools than I plan to have available here, with the need to cut and thickness longer lengths of timber than I could carry on an aircraft back here.

    Mind you though, a simple ply one could be achievable with a handsaw and my new Japanese saws....(if I dare ever take them near a piece of ply.....???)....... never say never eh!
    Larks

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  2. #1202
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post

    Mind you though, a simple ply one could be achievable with a handsaw and my new Japanese saws....(if I dare ever take them near a piece of ply.....???)....... never say never eh!
    I don't know which saws you got that are so gold plated, but one of the many benefits of the Japanese saws I use is that the blades are replaceable. I cut all sorts with them, including plywood, and they don't seem to have any issues regarding blade damage or wear. The only thing that has stopped one has been a tube of carbon fibre and I shouldn't have taken any normal saw near it. Never mind, all fixed with a quick trip to Carbatec.

  3. #1203
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Not gold plated Bruce, that'd be just silly.....just a bit special from the WBF in Tassie. They do have replaceable blades as yours does but I have enough other handsaws for cutting ply that I wouldn't waste the Japanese blade on it....just too bloody expensive.

    But Rick the quick did get me looking and the bateau D5 looks like something that might be achievable in my apartment garage here in WA with limited tools, and which I could easily throw on the ute to take home at the end of the year.....I've started a thread to see if anyone here has built one recently or has opinions on it: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...teau-D5-dinghy
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  4. #1204
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    For the sake of bumping the thread: I'm hoping to get a few small projects done while I'm working away from home in the West, to keep me busy and to know that there is at least some small progress happening on the H28.

    So at a recent woodworking show in Perth I went looking for some suitable tiller timber. It was a complete bloody rip off but at the last minute as I was leaving I was talked into saving a saw mill operator/seller (sawyer?) from having to drag this bit of osage orange home with him, for $10.00.



    I'd been led to believe that it was a bugger to cut, both from the miller describing what a challenge he'd had to cut it, and from what I'd read on the web.

    So I grabbed a couple of wedges to split it, expecting to have to split and shape in small and laborious increments:










    But when I pulled out the hand saw to square the ends off and clean them for sealing, I found to my delight that it actually cut quite nicely (for someone used to cutting hardwoods like jarrah), and the following seemed to just happen in no time at all:



    So I have a nice shape ready to carve the tiller from and a couple of nice staves ready to try shaping some bows from. I've sealed the ends will put them aside to dry for a while and see how they hold up.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  5. #1205
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    There's enough left for a longbow Greg .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  6. #1206
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    There's enough left for a longbow Greg .
    yes, that's the two staves that I mentioned (on the right on the bench in the pic). The bit on the left that looks the right shape for a bow but is cut around a knot so if I do anything with that it will have to be composite.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  7. #1207
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    I don't know about the bow business but the tiller blank looks perfect. Good things come to those who wait.

  8. #1208
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Gratuitous bump (because I had trouble finding it myself)


    actually 12 months since those last posts (with the Perth wood show on again tomorrow), and that Osage orange should be dry enough for me to start messing with it now.....something to do while epoxy or paint dries on my Thames skiff build.




    ..................................but I'm still thinking of you "Larrikin"......
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  9. #1209
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Wow Larks, that is one tiller that will never break! Osage gets darker as it ages so that tiller will look even better a couple of years down the line!
    Here is a note on Japanese saws, the ones with the disposible blades are great for general work and I use them a lot. But, I also have a lot of special purpose saws. There are some thirty or more different saws in a top grade Japanese cabinet maker's kit. A special saw that is available through suppliers of such tools is a hardwood saw. These have blades that are toothed very much like our Western hand saws are. Of course they work on the pull rather than on the push. The teeth are refered to as "mouse teeth". The blades are scraped to an hour glass cross section and also are thinner at the tip than at the heel which is nearest the handle. In addition, the line of the teeth is on a curve so that only three or four teeth are in contact with the wood during a stroke. All this reduces friction and allows the saw to cut with amazing speed and accuracy. One of those saws can be seen at the upper edge of the canvas saw case in the picture here. I gotta say that I do take very good care of my saws and oil them with Camelia oil after every use. In addition, they get dusted with a moisture absorbing powder prior to going back in the storage case. The saws in the picture are over thirty years old, get used often but have yet to rust due to the care they get.
    Jay

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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Time for another gratuitous bump as I had a bit of trouble finding this again myself.

    Progress is imminent.........really!!
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  11. #1211
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Have your photos disappeared Greg ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  12. #1212
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Have your photos disappeared Greg ?
    Looks like just the last lot on this page Peter, I must have deleted them off of Photobucket by mistake when I cleared it out a while ago - (had me worried for a minute)
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  13. #1213
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Larks, If you are still talking "Dinghy" I have three designs you can choose from. The first is the Neria Dinghy by LFH this boat can be planked with plywood and has sawn futtock frames. You are probably familiar with it already. Eight feet in length with a fairly flat bottom it can be handy for a combination of work due to its inherent stability. One can stand up and wash down topsides from it or carry a lot of gear. It is designed to fit on the bridge deck of the "Neria" but is too big to be taken aboard the H28. It tows well and can be rigged for sail.
    Then there is the six footer I built for "Red Witch" that fits over her narrow deck house. It will carry two adults to and from shore and also sails pretty well for a six foot pram. Then there is the barrow style boat I use for "Bright Star" it is also planked with plywood and sails very well. A set of wheels slip into the centerboard slot and the oars hang over the transom and are used as handles. So, there you have three boats that are fairly easy to build with a few hand tools. The six foot pram is the simplest to build and can be carried on the deck of the H28. The barrow boat is eight feet but a bit heavy due to the fact she is planked with plywood. Of course the most versatile of the three is the eight foot Neria pram.
    If you are interested I can post some photos for you.
    Jay

  14. #1214
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    2017 is Larrikin’s 50th anniversary and I’d always intended (hoped) to have her back in the water to mark the occasion. Unfortunately work has kept me away from home for much of the time that I’ve owned her so her progress has stalled.

    So the plan, once I finish my contract up here in Darwin at the end of Feb’, is to finish up with the remote contract work for a while and have a crack at setting up a small business at home and to do that I need to make room in the shed, which conveniently means I need to finish Larrikin .

    I may still take on a few contracts to help finances and I do have a somewhat unexpected offer of a job starting in May/June that I’m considering as a fall-back, but my first priority will be to get Larrikin out of the shed and in the water to clear up some needed shed space and to do some sailing. (Actually first priority will be to hug my wife, second to get another dog and then get Larrikin finished and launched)

    I’ve got a bit of a financial cushion but I’ll need to start earning coin again reasonably quickly and so the quicker that I can get the rebuild done the quicker I’ll be able to start doing that.

    So the intention is to run the rebuild ostensibly as a commercial venture, by which I mean treat it as a job for a client rather than a hobby – ie:


    • Get up and go to work each day and put in a full days work;
    • Maintain a “time is money” focus as I would in a commercial world;
    • Not compromise on build standards and finishes;
    • Not waste money on crap that isn’t needed;
    • Not waste money on surplus materials – ie be smart with quantity estimates and purchases;
    • Stick to the budget;
    • Stick to the schedule;
    • Don’t overcapitalise
    • ......and so on


    I’ve got no intention of trying to make any profit out of this activity, but I have a realistic budget for the work and realistic expectations of what I want the value to be when completed.

    This project has always been primarily about what I can learn from it and enjoying the experience along the way with a boat to sail at the end of it and that hasn’t changed.

    So the focus now is not be about rushing a finish, but it is about finishing it to a schedule, getting myself into a “commercial work from home” frame of mind/routine (which will be somewhat new to me), proving to myself that I can do it and being happy with the final product.

    When I first bought her I did so because the hull was sound, the spars and rigging reasonably new and the sails in fair condition. The Volvo Penta engine was also OK but I decided quite a while ago that I’d replace it with a new one and so I sold it a couple of years ago.

    I have pretty much all the timber and most of the gear that I need to complete her, the two big ticket items to purchase now are:

    • Engine and batteries
    • Bronze portholes


    Aside from them I also need to buy


    • Electrical’s – interior lighting, wiring, switchboard
    • New prop’ (potentially - nothing wrong with the old one but am considering a folding prop)
    • Cooker
    • Toilet
    • GPS/plotter
    • VHF
    • Cushions/mattress
    • New flares, fire extinguishers, EPIRB
    • Fresh water tank
    • Possibly a new fuel tank if I decide to relocate it from it’s previous position under the cockpit seats to down under the main cabin bunk.....which has been my intention. (The existing one is shaped to fit the old spot)


    I may put her on the market when completed, on the basis that everything is for sale at the right price and because this has always been somewhat of a “classroom” boat for me, rather than something that I planned to keep long term. I don’t have any real expectations or aims of selling her quickly, but if someone does happen to come along and want her at that right price…..well lets just say that the money from the sale and the savings on mooring/berthing and maintenance will help towards the business that I’d like to establish.

    Ideally I’d like to take her up to the Whitsdundays and also down to Hobart for the Wooden Boat Festival, the next one being Feb 2019, so I aim to keep open minded.
    Last edited by Larks; 01-09-2017 at 09:45 PM.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  15. #1215
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Larks, If you are still talking "Dinghy" I have three designs you can choose from. The first is the Neria Dinghy by LFH this boat can be planked with plywood and has sawn futtock frames. You are probably familiar with it already. Eight feet in length with a fairly flat bottom it can be handy for a combination of work due to its inherent stability. One can stand up and wash down topsides from it or carry a lot of gear. It is designed to fit on the bridge deck of the "Neria" but is too big to be taken aboard the H28. It tows well and can be rigged for sail.
    Then there is the six footer I built for "Red Witch" that fits over her narrow deck house. It will carry two adults to and from shore and also sails pretty well for a six foot pram. Then there is the barrow style boat I use for "Bright Star" it is also planked with plywood and sails very well. A set of wheels slip into the centerboard slot and the oars hang over the transom and are used as handles. So, there you have three boats that are fairly easy to build with a few hand tools. The six foot pram is the simplest to build and can be carried on the deck of the H28. The barrow boat is eight feet but a bit heavy due to the fact she is planked with plywood. Of course the most versatile of the three is the eight foot Neria pram.
    If you are interested I can post some photos for you.
    Jay
    Thanks Jay, the 8’ Neria pram is what I’d had in mind for a while now, since selling the little “Bateau” that I’d built, though I expect it may be a little while now before I have the opportunity to do it justice. Ideally I’d like to build one if I take her down to Hobart for the next Wooden Boat Festival in 2019 and I reckon working full time on it I could complete one in pretty reasonable time, but I’ll see what happens with life between now and then.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  16. #1216
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    I love that "Neria" pram.
    Jay

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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Greg the commercial aspect, explained like that, now makes sense!

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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    As a newbie to all this woody boat stuff, Greg your thread has been a revelation & an a great source of enthusiasm, to see what can be done with simple love & labour is astonishing. A thoroughly interesting & enlightening read.

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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by cptsideways View Post
    As a newbie to all this woody boat stuff, Greg your thread has been a revelation & an a great source of enthusiasm, to see what can be done with simple love & labour is astonishing. A thoroughly interesting & enlightening read.
    Thank you cpt’, that is very generous of you and very much appreciated.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Thank you cpt’, that is very generous of you and very much appreciated.
    So much so this is rather very tempting, I'm certainly planning to have a look at it in the next few days

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/folk-boat-...kAAOSwZQRYb4ZR

  21. #1221
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by cptsideways View Post
    So much so this is rather very tempting, I'm certainly planning to have a look at it in the next few days

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/folk-boat-...kAAOSwZQRYb4ZR
    Looks interesting, though a little scary going on the colour of some of that timber shown in the interior photos. A shame it doesn’t include the spars and sails but post a new thread on it here, there are a few guys on this forum who will be very interested in it and who know folk boats so will have some very useful advice on what to look for when you inspect it - such as where to commonly expect to find rot and so on. Then take plenty of photos and post them here to help your evaluation.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  22. #1222
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    I’m in a bit of a quandary over the timber (and so the eventual appearance) of my cabin sides and deck hatches and am going back and forward between a dark or a light bright finish.

    The timber required for this is pretty much the only timber that I still need to buy to finish off the rebuild aspect of the boat and I’m finding myself in somewhat of a moral quandary (for want of a better term) as well as an aesthetic quandary.

    Since first taking on this rebuild I have had in my mind’s eye a dark or red timber finish after admiring the stunning finish on Bright Star:



    I do have one rather large plank of well-aged mahogany that would be sufficient to complete one side of the cabin, the cabin front and possibly some of the framing for the hatchway and aft cabin bulkhead. But not enough for the full job so I’ll have to source some more mahogany and try and match species and colour.

    The alternative that I’d been considering is to use New Guinea Rosewood for the cabin and use the mahogany for deck hatches and/or the interior joinery.

    However I am now wondering about going for a light timber finish for an appearance similar to Holliday and Lark. I’ve not been such a fan of the lighter topsides in the past, but these two are somewhat changing my thoughts on that:





    Being a Huon pine hull, I’m thinking a Huon pine bright finish would also be more suitable than a mahogany or rosewood finish, however Huon pine is not by any means a common or cheap timber and, whilst available, to source sufficient for the cabin construction and hatches I know would be a significant cost.

    However (and here’s the somewhat “moral” dilemma) I can buy a 5mm Huon pine veneer to lay over a plywood structure at a more affordable price, ie @$50.00 (excluding GST) square metre. By rough estimate I’d need about 7 square metres of timber or 14 square metres of veneer.

    So the cost of veneer would be around $700.00 plus freight from Tasmania. I already have most of the marine ply that I can use for the structure so minimal cost there.

    I am waiting on a price for solid huon pine but, based on what I’ve paid before, I’m guessing somewhere about $2,500 plus freight from Tasmania (???).

    So the veneer is a cheaper option and, whilst the solid Huon pine planks would be quite dimensionally stable, the ply structure would no doubt be even more stable again…..


    Hence the choices as I see them:

    Mahogany
    New Guinea Rosewood
    Huon pine timber
    Huon pine veneers over ply

    Dark or light?

    Solid or veneer?
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  23. #1223
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    It's your choice of course Greg but I can see the logic of huon as long as it's 5mm, giving sufficient wood to sand back to if needed .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Hey Greg whatever you decide on it will look great , personally I do like the Huon Pine colours but to me they say I belong in Tassie . Veneer is good but what happens when you get busy and just don't have the time to look after the varnish in our harsh climate. I also tend to be rough with my equipment spinnaker poles dinghy on and of the deck ect ,which does veneer no favours.
    My choice would be NG Rosewood I like the smell and it is durable and easy to work with, if you shop around you will find enough for your needs at a reasonable price .

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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    I say paint.

  26. #1226
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I say paint.
    Agree but I'm rubbish at maintaining bright work.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  27. #1227
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Paint is ok but I do like a bit of varnish for contrast. In fact, I get a chance do a bit of daydreaming and planning of other projects during varnishing breaks. Varnish, to me, is only a hassle if it is let go too long. I use the best brushes I can afford, good varnish and attitude for the job before it gets too long in the tooth!

    A varnished deck house on the H28 makes a good looking contrast to a well painted hull. My own choice and favorite wood for trim is Honduras Mahogany, Bright Star is African which takes a bit more of a fuss to stain it. but it is durable and gives good service. Plus, it looks great when varnished. We varnish Bright Star once a year which takes roughly a week for two of us to accomplish. Masts are done every two years and take about four days to sand and lay on two coats from a boatswain's chair. Since I grew out of my job, I let my wife Anne enjoy the view from the custom chair I built for her. wear sunglasses in order to see the contrast of the holiday skips and thin spots. Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 02-14-2017 at 03:23 PM.

  28. #1228
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    She looks lovely Jay. Well kept varnish does. On other peoples boats

    Greg, it would be worth giving Rogue Empire a call, in Huonville. They are mostly a furniture and antiques store, but have a back room stacked with slabs of tassie timber. And I think I saw a sign in there saying delivery $60, any amount to anywhere in Australia. Big slabs of Huon which would do a cabin side in one go were about $400. I didn't check the price of celery top, but probably cheaper and a great timber, stable, hard and pretty. As I say worth a phone call.

  29. #1229
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Thanks for the comments all, plenty to think about. However I will definitely be giving her a bright finish, that’s been the plan since the very first day I took her on and with Bright Star as the bench mark I know I’ll have my work cut out to come even close to her finish.

    Thanks for the heads up re Rogue Empire Phil, I’ll definitely give them a call and I’ll also price up the celery top for comparison. I had been considering it but a few bits that I looked at on line seemed to be similar in price to the Huon pine. That freight cost, if they’re fair dinkum, sounds worth taking them up on.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  30. #1230
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Greg my experience from the architectural side is that strong sunlight will degrade the timber colour radically, and no UV inhibitors or anything similar will prevent this, though they might slow it down a bit. I'm completely with you on the varnish, and, as long as the hull is white, I also like the lighter coloured timber for cabin sides. However, if the hull is darker, I think the lighter timbers for cabin sides look s**t (less than attractive). So I think cabin sides choice of timber needs to be done side by side with topsides colours. And lastly, in our climate, I think you need a cover over all brightwork, even the small stuff. But you're probably on top of all this already.
    Flat bottomed boats, you make the rockin' world go round.............

  31. #1231
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by johnno View Post
    Greg my experience from the architectural side is that strong sunlight will degrade the timber colour radically, and no UV inhibitors or anything similar will prevent this, though they might slow it down a bit. I'm completely with you on the varnish, and, as long as the hull is white, I also like the lighter coloured timber for cabin sides. However, if the hull is darker, I think the lighter timbers for cabin sides look s**t (less than attractive). So I think cabin sides choice of timber needs to be done side by side with topsides colours. And lastly, in our climate, I think you need a cover over all brightwork, even the small stuff. But you're probably on top of all this already.
    Yes John, topsides will be an antique white, which I think I’ve now got reasonably formulated from the Thames skiff build. And agreed re the covers over brightwork, I’ve been keeping a bit of a quiet eye out for an industrial sewing machine so that I can make covers up myself, eventually.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  32. #1232
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    For Mahogany the trick of not having the color bleach out is to first use filler stain. I mix Interlux red and brown mahogany half and half to get the color of freshly varnished unstained Mahogony before the sun bleaches it. A coat of clear acrylic lacquer sealer goes on first to prevent the stain from muddying the grain pattern. Once it drys, often ten minutes on a hot day, the stain, which has been thinned to the consistency of buttermilk, is applied and wiped off with terry cloth or burlap just as it hazes off. Let it dry overnight and apply the first coat of varnish thinned out with turpentine to get penetration. A full strength hot coat can be put on as soon as it is tacky. If time permits, lay on a third coat when that tacks.
    Double coating can be done up until the sixth coat. I sand beween the next two. Hot coating gives fast build up. Eight coats is the magic number. More than that and you risk turning the job "Varnish Sick" which can result in blisters that result from heat soak and an overly thick skin. Filler stain is made of earth pigments and will not bleach in the sun.
    Jay

  33. #1233
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Yes John, topsides will be an antique white, which I think I’ve now got reasonably formulated from the Thames skiff build. And agreed re the covers over brightwork, I’ve been keeping a bit of a quiet eye out for an industrial sewing machine so that I can make covers up myself, eventually.
    I've just bought one of these for just that job Greg. A friend has one and says it's capable of sewing 5 layers of canvas.
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Singer-se...YAAOSwhOVXeGB0

    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  34. #1234
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    I've just bought one of these for just that job Greg. A friend has one and says it's capable of sewing 5 layers of canvas.
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Singer-se...YAAOSwhOVXeGB0
    Thanks Peter, what sort of dollars do you think they’re worth? This one says pick up only - any idea on weight if I need to organise a courier?
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
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    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  35. #1235
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    I paid $100 for mine so I'd just keep an eye out for one at a price you like. Courier probably although Oz Post would do it. I'll go weigh mine now .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Greg, 14 kg.with the case.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Thanks Peter - it’s not something that I’m in any great hurry for, got a few other priorities ahead of that. I’m hoping to find one closer to home that I can see running first anyway
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  38. #1238
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    This is the machine .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  39. #1239
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    For Mahogany the trick of not having the color bleach out is to first use filler stain. I mix Interlux red and brown mahogany half and half to get the color of freshly varnished unstained Mahogony before the sun bleaches it. A coat of clear acrylic lacquer sealer goes on first to prevent the stain from muddying the grain pattern. Once it drys, often ten minutes on a hot day, the stain, which has been thinned to the consistency of buttermilk, is applied and wiped off with terry cloth or burlap just as it hazes off. Let it dry overnight and apply the first coat of varnish thinned out with turpentine to get penetration. A full strength hot coat can be put on as soon as it is tacky. If time permits, lay on a third coat when that tacks.
    Double coating can be done up until the sixth coat. I sand beween the next two. Hot coating gives fast build up. Eight coats is the magic number. More than that and you risk turning the job "Varnish Sick" which can result in blisters that result from heat soak and an overly thick skin. Filler stain is made of earth pigments and will not bleach in the sun.
    Jay
    Thank you Jay - I’ll confess here that I have a “Jay” file on my computer, which I started in 2009 and where I tuck away all of these gems of advice. Your experiences are not something that can be found in books or google searches and I value them highly.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  40. #1240
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    She looks lovely Jay. Well kept varnish does. On other peoples boats

    Greg, it would be worth giving Rogue Empire a call, in Huonville. They are mostly a furniture and antiques store, but have a back room stacked with slabs of tassie timber. And I think I saw a sign in there saying delivery $60, any amount to anywhere in Australia. Big slabs of Huon which would do a cabin side in one go were about $400. I didn't check the price of celery top, but probably cheaper and a great timber, stable, hard and pretty. As I say worth a phone call.
    Interesting: I’ve compared a few prices and, if I’m doing my calculations correctly, I’m seeing plane Huon pine planks (i.e. not advertised as highly figured or anything special) for sale at roughly $12,000.00 m3 from one seller, $15,500.00 from another and even $24,444 from one .

    But Celery top is showing around $5,000 m3
    Last edited by Larks; 02-15-2017 at 01:00 AM.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  41. #1241
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    For canvas work you don't need a industrial walking foot machine. Any old all metal domestic with a 4-5mm zig-zag will do. My favorite would be a Necchi BU like this one: http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/kirri...ine/1133869032 It's nowhere near you but the price can't be beaten. Old Necchis are almost always undervalued because people don't know them. They only heard of Singer, Pfaff and maybe Bernina, never of Necchi, Janome, Toyota, and others.
    If you like to spend money buy this one, it's a sailrite: http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/kawun...ine/1138499933

    For the cabin I would go for the plywood option. It gives you a leakfree substrate you can then veneer with your choice of wood. You probably could do everything out of your mahagony plank, maybe even the interior if you can slice it thin enough and reduce waste. All matching of course.

  42. #1242
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    I've been looking at sewing machines too, for sail covers and the like. As far as I can tell industrial machines just go really fast. As suggested above, many older home machines will do the job just fine.

  43. #1243
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Thank you Jay - I’ll confess here that I have a “Jay” file on my computer, which I started in 2009 and where I tuck away all of these gems of advice. Your experiences are not something that can be found in books or google searches and I value them highly.
    Larks, I had to learn the hard way. As a result of all that effort I try to make things easier for my peers. Have you chosen an engine yet? I am still seeking one for "Bright Star" without having made a final choice. I am leaning towards the Kohler as it is light.
    Jay

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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Larks, I had to learn the hard way. As a result of all that effort I try to make things easier for my peers. Have you chosen an engine yet? I am still seeking one for "Bright Star" without having made a final choice. I am leaning towards the Kohler as it is light.
    Jay
    I’m still waiting on a price for the Kohler/Lombardini Jay, so at the moment I’m leaning most heavily towards the Yanmar 3YM20. It is bigger and heavier than the Kohler but similar weight to the old Volvo 2002b that I took out, is actually coming in reasonably competitive on price and the Qld head office is very close to home.

    The owner of the marine engineering company that I used to manage is in the process of taking over the Kohler distribution so I’m expecting to get a pretty good price out of him.
    Greg
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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  45. #1245
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Larks, I had to learn the hard way. As a result of all that effort I try to make things easier for my peers. Have you chosen an engine yet? I am still seeking one for "Bright Star" without having made a final choice. I am leaning towards the Kohler as it is light.
    Jay
    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    I’m still waiting on a price for the Kohler/Lombardini Jay, so at the moment I’m leaning most heavily towards the Yanmar 3YM20. It is bigger and heavier than the Kohler but similar weight to the old Volvo 2002b that I took out, is actually coming in reasonably competitive on price and the Qld head office is very close to home.

    The owner of the marine engineering company that I used to manage is in the process of taking over the Kohler distribution so I’m expecting to get a pretty good price out of him.
    Greg

    Jay, since posting the above I’ve received a revised “boat show” price on the Nanni 3.21 and the price on the Kohler (Lombardini) LDW702 and have gone from getting excited about the Nanni (because of price and inclusions) to getting excited about the Kohler because I can get it at an exceptionally good price compared to normal retail (through my industry contacts).

    So I’m now bouncing between the Nanni and the Kohler, each has different benefits -

    - the Nanni is 3 cylinder so should be smoother running, but the 2 cylinder Lombardini is supposedly more modern technology so possibly as smooth running;
    - there is only 7kg difference in weight
    - the Kohler has a 120amp alt v the Nanni at 70amp, but the Nanni (if I am reading it correctly) has an option for a boiler to be installed using the heat exchanger - (I’m still trying to work that one out - this is the comment in the product blurb: "The latest generation heat exchanger im-proves the temperature regulation, whichquality can particularly be appreciated when aboiler is installed. “)
    Last edited by Larks; 02-16-2017 at 04:38 AM.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  46. #1246
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    We heat water from our Yanmar, works well. Hard to know what mr Kohler is talking about though. You heat from the engine coolant, which should be temperature controlled by a thermostat. And I think you might be talking amps, not hp on the alternators.

  47. #1247
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    We heat water from our Yanmar, works well. Hard to know what mr Kohler is talking about though. You heat from the engine coolant, which should be temperature controlled by a thermostat. And I think you might be talking amps, not hp on the alternators.
    Of course, been a long and challenging day - (was playing on the WBF for a bit of relief)
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  48. #1248
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    The engine in "Bright Star" was Universal Atomic 5416 twin diesel that produced 16hp and weighed in at 365lbs/165.5kg.
    I have always wished the engine were lighter in weight. It was installed in the 1960's and gave good service but, even though it had a head exchanger, it gave up to a perforated water jacket and was unreparable. We considered the Yanmar but, I still want less weight in the stern. It looks like the Kohler/Lombardi will be the one I will take. It produces 18HP, two more HP than the old engine and it weighs in at 99kg/218lbs which is 147lbs lighter than the old engine. That makes an amazing difference to my thinking!
    Thanks for the reference to the Kohler/Lambardini Diesel Larks!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 02-16-2017 at 02:56 PM.

  49. #1249
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    Default Re: H28 "Larrikin" rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Of course, been a long and challenging day - (was playing on the WBF for a bit of relief)
    I can't remember whether I know what work you are doing in Darwin, but if it's one of those top secret Navy jobs you might want to go back over what you did yesterday

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