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Thread: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

  1. #71
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    You can see in this closeup, a simple "dot" was made at the end of each pointed stick... then we "connected the dots" in a fair way which represents the shape we are trying to duplicate as close as possible.



    Heres the line drawing of the panel, and it should be pretty close to the required shape. It will be cut out with my Hypoid saw and cleaned up with a low angle block plane.



    Heres a shot of a previous panel that was fabricated with the same process. A few more bulkheads to go... then all will be glassed before installation. Surfaces that will be exposed to weather etc, will be glassed with 6 oz fiberglass cloth... panels that will never see the light of day, will be triple coated with epoxy at minimum unless glassing is worth considering because of difficult access and possible moisture influx, etc... Note: keeping the weight down is a priority in this build.... many of the bulkheads will be 6mm Okoume, with vertical "stiffeners" (Doug fir 1 X 2's) added at strategic locations to keep the bulkheads as stiff as possible while keeping the weight down.



    More to come the next couple of days...

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 03-27-2010 at 01:44 AM.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Excellent documentation--thanks for taking the time to shoot and write during the build. May I ask two questions?
    1. In attaching the pointers to the pattern frame, do you get started by just sort of "winging it" until you have enough pointers to sort of hold it close to position?

    2. Will there be limbers in the bulkheads?

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Excellent documentation--thanks for taking the time to shoot and write during the build. May I ask two questions?
    1. In attaching the pointers to the pattern frame, do you get started by just sort of "winging it" until you have enough pointers to sort of hold it close to position?

    2. Will there be limbers in the bulkheads?

    Kevin
    On the first pointers on the pattern frame, I staple two of them, on each lower corner to just hold the pattern frame in the correct position resting on them. The position of the pattern frame is arbitrary, as long as you can place pointers on the frame that "touch" the interior hull at all necessary locations. You could use a rough piece of ply wood instead of a frame and use the Compass/circle method, or the spieling block method... I like the "sticker" method here.

    After the two bottom corner sticks are positioned, , I install the two top pointers, using the C-clamp and spring clamp to hold them in place. With those four "stickers", the rest is just a matter of delineating the shape of the hull with more sticks.



    Limber holes will be cut where needed, except for the foremost bow area, (anchor locker )

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 03-28-2010 at 12:08 AM.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Really enjoying this thred. Excellent instructional format. Good work.
    Once you've gone the distance, go the extra mile!
    ---------------------------
    Matthew Trent

  5. #75
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Someone here recently was asking about fitting bulkheads. I forget who (mad cow?) They could prifitably memorize this section of your very interesting thread.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Hope a couple of these pics are not too redundant... Heres some shots in daylight.

    From start of the setup in the previous post... to ready to transfer shape to plywood. This last setup came out very good, shows consistent technique pays off... ie., using the same side of all the sticks to mark dots... If you use sticks of the same thickness and take off your reference point from the "sticks points" all on the same side of the sticks, you will achieve maximum accuracy. The idea is to keep all your reference sticks in the same plane for proper accuracy. This particular bulkhead offered the easiest access because it was at the end of the hull ... perhaps that made it easier to be a bit more precise on this final one.



    Fitting this last bulkhead on the remnants of a sheet of 3/8" ply.



    Outline from pattern....



    And cutting out the panel with my left blade Makita worm drive (Hypoid) circular saw.

    The left blade Hypoid framing saw is great for this because of the "gyro effect" of worm drive saws... which is produced because the motor and the blade spin on different planes. This "Gyro" effect allows amazing control with this saw... ie., you can easily follow a line with one hand... and stay as close to the line as you wish. This saw may be heavier than a sidewinder circular saw, but it allows much more control with less effort. Note: start the saw with the blade a reasonable distance away from the stock, as it is very powerful and does not have soft start. Being easy to control only comes about after it is running, after the "jerk" of power as the motor starts. Additionally, the left blade allows you to watch the blade closely as you cut... thus allowing very accurate work. I almost always use this "left blade" saw in cutting along a line.





    I should not move on without mentioning the table I use for processing panels... the Eurekazone "Smart-table" (www.ekurekazone.com). The Smart-Guide along with this "Smart-Table" are just amazing and easy to use in cutting plywood panels. I also use mine for just about any type of cutting.... and with its sacrificial 2 X3's as a bearing surface, you can replace them easily and have a brand new table whenever needed. I have a normal "sidewinder circular saw" that I keep in the Smartguide saw base... and only use it for cutting plywood panels. I use my Makita Hypoid saw for almost all other cutting because of its control and power.




    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 03-29-2010 at 08:57 AM.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    I also use my "Smart Table" when planing the edges of a panel to the "line"...with my low angle block plane...





    This sternmost bulkhead fits the best yet. Consistent and careful technique seems to make the entire process more accurate... imagine that??

    I should not end this segment without mentioning that no matter how good a frame template you produce, you will still have some final fitting with a low angle block plane... which is a necessary skill to learn for these bulkhead installations. The easiest way for me is to look very closely at the edges of the panel (bulkhead) where it is resting on the interior of the hull... and note the "contact points... mark these with a pencil line right on the surface of your panel, close to the edge you will be planing. Next remove some material with the block plane and try it again... Continue this process until she fits well enough to suit you.



    Glassing of these bulkheads comes next... then installation in the hull.

    Con't


    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 03-28-2010 at 01:23 AM.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    I share thoughts on the practice of proper fitting panels, bulkheads and various pieces in stitch and glue construction. Never did buy into the idea that thickend epoxy will cure ill fitting joinery work in this of type work. Careful craftsmanship makes all the difference in the final product. Nice work....

  9. #79
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    Default Re: John Henry... Glassing panels...

    Thanks Mike...

    Here are the panels ready to be glassed... I actually did the work on the furtherest end and then placed each panel in a good spot... I always try to make for an easy to work setup.



    Panels wetted out as usual procedure...



    And final coat of epoxy.... ready to be installed... I kinda made this process go faster by applying "two coats at once" with the pouring on and rolling quickly to an even thickness... lightly tipping. I made sure the epoxy was warmed to the lower 80 degrees and they looked like glass.



    The transom comes next, and will be quite exotic because the owner wants to incorporate "recessed" trim tabs both in the transom and the sternmost hull below the transom. I will show a pic of this in the transom fabrication process...

    RodB

  10. #80
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    I built several small boats from a " underlaymant that only came in 4' x 4' sheets.
    With a panel that small it's not hard to rig up a 7 fixture from 2 x 4s and ply that allows cutting the scarfs on an ordinary table saw. The trick is to support the panel near it's top so as not to crush the feather edge as it comes off the blade.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: John Henry... transom fabrication

    Continuing...

    So heres the types of trim tab installation we have seen... and we much prefer the "recessed" version... on the Mavericks.



    The basic transom outline, drawn out on both the 3/4" forward panel and the 3/8" aft panel. Note the registration nails in the corners... The transom will be initially built oversized enough to allow for the increased bevel dimension required when the transom sides and bottom angles are cut... to fit the hull.



    This rough drawing shows the basic plan to provide blocking atop the forward 3/4" ply with the 3/8" ply on the aft end. The recessed areas in the hull and on the back of the transom will be fabricated slightly larger than required so that the added thickness resulting from glassing will not change the required dimensions.



    To start, I used the Smartguide (entended length of two sections) to cut the necessary stock pieces from the excess 3/4" Okoume we have. The 3/4" was ordered for the base of the transom, but we decided to use up the rest of the sheet in blocking for the transom interior. Its about the weight of Doug fir and its here and paid for and... everything will be encapsulated in epoxy. My circular saw has a dust collection port, but I must admit I hardly ever use it. The accuracy of this smart guide when cutting ply the long way is really good.



    The "smart clamps" are really cool, and I prefer them to the foam tape they also offer. They slide in the extruded grooves so easily and allow for very quick clamp up for cutting stock.

    .




    Continued....

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 03-29-2010 at 12:43 PM.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Heres the basic perimeter blocking for the transom, note both the 3/4" and 3/8" ply panels are on the bottom in the photos. The blocking thickness is 2 1/4" thick, added to that will be the 3/8" ply end cap. Additionally, material will be added to the center to extend just past the bottom motor mount bolts by approx 2". The material for the trim tab slots is next.



    Another angle, the top cutouts on the 3/4" and 3/8" ply panels are not done yet. The final width of the blocking after the transom shape is cut will be about 1.5 inches on the sides and bottom of the transom. As I said before, the blocking you see here is oversized in width to accomodate the required extra width of the transom when the bevel is cut for the sides and bottom.






    Here the trim tab actuator is layed in place to check the height of the blocking. A bevel piece will be installed at the top of the trim tab to make for a perfect space for the trim tab actuator to connect to the actual trim tab plate at the bottom of the hull. More to come at weeks end.



    RodB

  13. #83
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    In the process of figuring out the final details on how to duplicate a similar type of installation as seen here...

    The transom completion and installation is the next priority ... lots of angle critical cuts to achieve the proper setup.

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 03-31-2010 at 10:38 AM.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Rod.. am really enjoying this post and your expertise, which is far greater than mine. WIth that said, consider this suggestion: the geometry and relatsionship of the tab actuator to the tab itself is complex. (I've installed lots of trim tabs). the tabs are angled to follow the deadrise, and the actuator, mounted to the angled transom, has to allow them to rise and fall without binding. You might want to dry fit or otherwise mock up the tabs and actuators as they will be on the finished boat before you commit to the position and size of your recesses.

    I realize you may well already know all this, but I thought it worth sharing. Please keep posting because I am thoroughly enjoying your build!

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Thanks for the comments... lots of my experience comes from books...
    Excellent idea on the trial setup...Kevin, I was more or less copying the setup on the Maverick and my deadrise is very close to the same and I am installing the actuators just as they do, and as with the Maverick, I'm using a 14 degree shim on the bottom of the actuator where it connects to the trim tab. At the top, there is a 45 degree beveled end piece where the actuator connects and the wire runs through the transom.

    You are right, no matter how close I am trying mimick the setup in the Maverick photo... I will not know for sure exactly how it will move when it lets the tab down without a test setup... which I should probably go ahead and try. I was planning on keeping enough clearance between the actuator and the back of the slot it fits in and then try the actuator.

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 03-31-2010 at 10:29 PM.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Getting closer to glueup on this damn transom... next comes the trim tab cutouts in the hull at the transom... and measuring/fitting the precise connection point for the top of the actuator. You can see here, the beveled stock at the top of the actuator will be the adjustment point for "exact" fitting of the power units. The blocking around the perimeter ) sides and bottom... will end up after cutout at about 1.5" in width.





    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-01-2010 at 11:08 PM.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Transom glueup for approx 60% of blocking...



    Layout lines for trim tabl cutout....



    Trim tab cutout with bevel cut ...



    Con't RodB

  18. #88
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    Default Re: John Henry... transom glueup/ recessed trim tab fabrication

    More glueup of transom blocking... Transom will be cut out after the perimeter interior blocking is completed.



    Last piece before trial fit of Transom and measurement fit for trim tab actuators...



    Six degree cut on the sides of the transom... transom is about 5" thick, so a standard 7 1/4" saw will not cut completely through... so I just cut the right angle and let Mark do the easy part... finishing the cut by hand ... All in all, I much prefer having the right tool like a 10 inch circular saw for such cuts... so you have no complications, just straightforward progress. After messing with this partial cut situation, I'd go rent a larger blade framing saw if doing it again.... just simpler in the long run. I wish I had never sold the 10" Makita I bought in a pawn shop!





    And here the 6 1/4 degree transom side cut...



    Now, to the trim tab recessed pocket fabrication...

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-05-2010 at 06:10 PM.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    The trim tab recess needs to be tapered to fit the shape of the recessed trim tab properly. The back of the trim tab is about 3/4" in height laying on a flat surface, the forward end of the trim tab is only about 3/8" thick... so a tapered housing is required. The hull thickness is 3/8" and I needed about one inch depth max at the stern end of the tab plate.

    Here is one of the tapered Doug Fir wedges that will form a tapered recess for the trim tab plates.



    Here, the wedge glueup and the trim tab recess covers are shown in the center...



    The wedges glued in place... The cover to be glued on top of the wedges will extend past the end of the wedges about 3.5 inches to form a strong recess construction.



    Heres the transom dry fitted to mark the opening in the trim tab recess covers and then the distance from the top connection of the trim tab actuator to the connection at the trim tab plate. Note the aft transom ply panel is removed to achieve these measurements.... and this panel will not be permanently glued on the back of the transom until the the interior of the transom is completed... ie., the length of the large slots the trim tab actuators reside in and connetion points etc must be determined before final bonding of the aft panel.



    Here, the structure more or less that will be the end results... with the trim tab hinges installed at the front of the recess with screws.




    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-04-2010 at 09:02 AM.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    I decided to ditch the three pieces of 3/4" Okoume stacked for the sides of the trim tab recess channel... and to just go with single pieces of Doug Fir. Its just simpler and less work. Here the trim tab recess blocking is dry fitted and a hole was drilled where the mounting bracket has an opening to run the wire through the transom.



    This photo shows the beginning process of fabricating the wire run in two stages.



    Here, the second stage of the drilling connects to the first hole that originates on the forward face of the transom.



    This pic shows the drawing for the installation of the trim tab actuator bracket quite well... the reason for all this systematic work in proper sequence is so that the mounting distance between the actual trim tab plate and the actuator's top mount is "exactly the correct distance". ... not any room for error.



    Note the scrap wire wrapped with polyethylene will avoid any problems with epoxy intruding into the wire run.



    With the final bonding of the transom blocking done, now just some cleanup with a scraper and sander... and shes just about ready to install into the hull. Fitting to the hull is done, so now we just gotta do the cut outs on the transom aft face ply, coat the interior surfaces with epoxy, cut some foam... and then close up the transom by gluing the aft ply panel on. Oh yea, the exterior surfaces of the transom will have to be glassed before installation.



    More to come...

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-09-2010 at 01:49 AM.

  21. #91
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Some progress... transom top angle cut...



    Trim tab recesses completed... just about ready for installaltion of transom to hull... Note, the aft plywood panel has not been glued on yet... The transom interior needs to be coated with epoxy and then some floatation foam needs to be installed into he empty spaces.



    Kinda looking like it should...

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Final check on fit before installation.



    Con't

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-11-2010 at 12:40 AM.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    OUTSTANDING WORK RodB!

    Quote Originally Posted by RodB
    ... lots of my experience comes from books... ]
    For those that are interested, your tick-stick method of spiling is well documented in Walt Simmons book on lapstrake boat building.

    He prolly copied it from you though

    There has been a lot of discussion about circular saws on the Forum these days. Could you tell us more about your Hilti?

    Thanks, your progress is great, a lot faster than mine.
    Steve Martinsen

  23. #93
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    There has been a lot of discussion about circular saws on the Forum these days. Could you tell us more about your Hilti?


    The Hilti 267E was certainly one of the best circular saws on the market when I bought it... and it was damn expensive. Since then, I have found it to be very powerful with its inline gear system, it has lower rpm's with plenty of torque. I have also found it to be everything the Hilti rep told me, powerful, light, lots of solid features like a double lock on the base positioning, etc. keeps up rpms no matter the work load, etc. I also bought it because it is considered the best saw to use with the Eurekazone SmartGuide.... because of its dust collection port, smooth power, etc. Its main selling points for me were its light weight, great handling, and plenty of power.
    I mostly use it now for my Smart Guide because the Smart Guide base is attached to it, I also built a nice scarfing jig and it was built around the Hilti.

    I pretty much use a simple older model Makita Hypoid circular saw for most general cutting simply because of its power, stability and ease of handling when following a line freehand, and great blade visibility when cutting with it. I probably wouldn't buy the Hilti again because I prefer left blade saws now, but it and its successors are extremely well made saws with great handling and power, etc.

    http://products.howstuffworks.com/hi...wer-review.htm

    http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com...ad.php?t=14327

    http://www.testseek.com/house/home/t...8913de18f.html

    http://news.thomasnet.com/fullstory/458624

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-11-2010 at 12:37 AM.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Transom installation will be in the next few days... finally the multi-detailed work is about done. More on that this week.


    Next, here is the bonding for the forward most bulkhead, which will be an integral part of the anchor locker but also abuts the fuel tank from the bow. We really just wanted to get this tabbed in place because we were working on the fuel tank platform and wanted this forward most bulkhead to be fixed in place. We used four such blocks on the forward surface of this bulkhead...and applied small fillets on the aft surface to "tab" her in place. We will complete the filleting process later on.



    Heres a closeup of one of the stabilizing blocks used to hold the bulkhead in place while you bond it in place. A single 1/4" crown staple in a wooden block like this holds its postion well and is easily removed after the bulkhead is tabbed or bonded. Usually I apply a few blocks on one side of the bulkhead and bond the other side completely. The damage the staple does to the hull panel is minimal and easily fixed with a bit of epoxy filler.



    Heres the forward surface where I secured the bulkhead in place...



    Note the small fillets (tabs) on the bulkhead in the background.

    In the foreground note the fuel tank platform supports. I won't go into the pattern process again, but here we have fabricated the two fuel tank shelf supports. We are using strips of scrap wood to hold the suports in place while we measured and planned the shelf that fits here. Note: limber holes will be cut into these platform supports before installation.

    Another way to do this is to install fore and aft stringers, one in the center and another on each side about mid bottom panel. I chose this method of side to side supports because these members will reinforce the shape of the bottom, which had plenty of "torturous shape" involve.



    And heres the pattern template for the fuel tank shelf... same as other pattern methods, only this time I used hot glue instead of air powered crown staples. The hot glue works great in many situations... I think the "pointed sticks" need to be ligher with hot glue, and more robust with 1/4" crown staples. . Note the sticks in the front of the image... ie., those two sicks on each side plus the one in the center pointing backwards delineate the sternmost edge of this shelf.



    Checking out the level-ness of the shelf fit.... Continued...



    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-12-2010 at 08:39 AM.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    The fuel tank positioned for trial. This is a Moeller 18 gallon Polyethylene tank. The simple "j"brackets will be used to hold down the tank on this shelf.



    This fuel tank installation calls for a very short straight fill hose connection to the deck directly above the tank. One of the things I like about a straight in fill hose is that you can use a calibrated wooden dowel stick to check your fuel level as a standard operational procedure... thost damn fuel senders never last anyway. This method was recommended to me by an old retired boat rigger and makes lots of sense. The first time you fill the tank, just stop every 2-3 gallons and mark it on a piece of wooden dowel. Later on, just make some notches with knife so that you can always see your level marks easily. ... wallah! you have a calibrated dip stick.

    BTW, we are following the basic layout we have seen on several "flats boats", and after some analysis we concluded locating the fuel tank in the bow area will work well in maintaining a more or less level floating aspect as fuel burns as with many of the boats we are evaluating as "cutting edge" performance poling skiffs for game fishing.



    This image gives you a different perspective, and the fuel tank plus about 18 inches aft of it will be included as the fuel tank /and storage compartment. The entire front deck will be about 6'6" from the tip of the stem to the back bulkhead of the front deck.



    Later....

    Rodb
    Last edited by RodB; 04-12-2010 at 07:23 AM.

  26. #96
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    I like the dip stick method. Those darn fuel senders never last for me either. I was stranded with the family off a point one night thinking I had 1/4 tank left (more than enough to get the 2 miles back home) and low and behold...cold wet night until the bro in law came 3 hours later....

    Thanks for the update.

  27. #97
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Heres the console from my first flats/skiff, showing the center console with the gas fill also straight down. I have a couple dip sitcks in the boat, tucked away...and can always check my fuel level simply and accurately. This helm setup was my design... partly taken from a couple other craft that I had seen. I actually have the gas gauge installed but mostly use the dip sticks because of their accuracy.



    The fuel fill is the black oval thingy that incorporates both the fill and the vent connections.




    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-12-2010 at 02:20 PM.

  28. #98
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    Default Re: John Henry... transom install...

    The stern wetted out with thickened epoxy ready for the transom. All contact surfaces coated with plain epoxy... then coated again with thickened epoxy (cabosil to wood flour 3:1). I wanted the epoxy mixture to be a strong glue...but also thicker than you get with just cabosil alone. I also wanted lots of squeeze out when the transom is screwed in place.





    Here she is after some filleting on the interior. Several screws were installed into the transom core through the hull sides and bottom to hold the transom in place for bonding. These screws were not tightened too much in order to insure the hull panels were not distorted against the transom... and that plenty of epoxy stayed in the joints.



    closer view of fillet at the port side of the transom...



    Almost done... The retangular ply tops of the trim tab recesses will be edge glued with flush strips of hardwood, then the top surfaces glassed overlapping the hardwood strips. Both the interior and exterior joints of the transom will be taped with biaxial . The exterior surfaces of the tops of the trim tab recesses were already glassed on their hull bottom surfaces.



    Pocket drive enclosure next...


    Con't

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-14-2010 at 12:23 AM.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Great thread, Rod.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: John Henry... pocket drive glue up

    The initial stages of the pocket drive glue up... more later...

    Rod


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    Default Re: John Henry... transom biaxial taped

    Transom and pocket drive biaxial taped... just about done on the stern...



    Hey Pipefitter, thanks for the comments.... still your little blue Simmons is much prettier than this flats skiff....

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-14-2010 at 09:29 PM.

  32. #102
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    Default Re: John Henry... anchor locker and fuel tank platform fabrication

    The anchor locker will drain forward at the stem... it will contain room enough for an anchor, 150 yards of anchor line, some chain, and a large orange ball/float that is used to mark the anchor drop off point when you have to cast off quickly when you hook a tarpon.

    Here is the pattern via hot glue for the anchor locker bottom panel.



    And here she is... with both side panels and the bottom panel. The space outside of the actual anchor locker within this forward area will be used for floatation foam.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    Heres a photo of my fly fishing flats skiff anchor locker and front deck. The hatch has a solid latch and stainless hinges from Accon, the same company that makes the pop up cleat shown... The anchor locker hatch was glassed both sides with wrap around.... etc. The non-skid is ground walnut shells sprinkled in paint... The trolling motor bracket removes easily and leaves a nice clean deck for "no hang up" fly fishing. The anchor locker hatch hinges are from Accon ( http://www.acconmarine.com/ ) , and have a nice corner radius that makes if quite easy to mortise them with a 3/8" router bit.





    Heres the fuel tank support structure bonded... with two floors and the cleat mounted on the anchor locker bulkhead. All these panels will be triple coated with epoxy, with the actual top surface of the fuel tank shelf being glassed.



    Now we need to glass or epoxy coat all and install...



    More to come... we are trying to be done by mid May... the annual Tarpon fishing trip.

    Con't

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-17-2010 at 02:55 AM.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    That's going to be a sweet set up.If I get to build my boat,I was gonna do something like that with my forward anchor locker.How is the walnut shells holding up in the paint?Sounds like another tip I can use for my boat.
    http://bensboatblog.blogspot.com/
    When peeing over the side,remember,one hand for you,and one hand for the ship.
    Proud Member Of The Elite LPBC.

  34. #104
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    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Ben2go...

    The ground walnut shells stand up great as a non-skid and are oh so easy to repair. The decks are glassed completely and that barrier is not disturbed in any way... because primer and paint applied atop the glassed decks is where the non-skid resides. We plan to use this same method with this present build.

    With only "wood particles" imbedded in the paint, its a very simple repair and "redo" procedure. Worse case scenario, if you ever decide to change to another type of non-skid, all you gotta do is sand down the decks (paint and wood particles) to the epoxy glassed surface...



    This closeup shows you the look and texture... I tested several grits of ground walnut shells before deciding on this grit. Heres a link to ground walnut shells: http://www.kramerindustriesonline.co...nut-shells.htm The 15 grit I used is still a bit too rough but smoothes down after some use. I guess a good test for roughness in non-skid is "can you kneel on it with your bare knees without a lot of discomfort"???? The ground walnut shells are only about $20 per 50 lb bag plus shipping.



    Application is easy... just tape off a pattern, roll on unthinned paint liberally to one section at a time with a 3/8" nap roller pad and immediately sprinkle on ground walnut shells until the surface is dry and covered with plenty of particles. I used a large mayonaise jar with the lid punctured about 25 times with holes about the size of a small BB. I had to fill the jar about 10 times to do the boat in these photos.



    Next, let it dry overnight... then blow off all the excess particles... and very lightly go over the surface with a 20 inch sanding board, I mean lightly... only to knock off any high points. Now apply two coats of thinned paint (15% thinned at least) to lock her down... When dry... your all done and can remove the tape. The thinned paint not only locks down the particles but also seals them nicely and does not fill in the textured surface enough to affect the non-skid effect. The areas outside of the taped non-skid areas are painted last with a brush. I also apply the thinned paint with a disposable 2" chip brush, moving along pretty quickly.





    Note the anchor locker filled with the essentials...




    Keel stringer installation is next, as the basis for the cockpit sole.

    RodB
    Last edited by RodB; 04-17-2010 at 02:59 AM.

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Upstate, South Carolina,USA
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    1,097

    Default Re: John Henry... Easy scarfing and glueup

    Thanks a lot for that tip.I appreciate it.I knew it was going to be trial and error,but that helps eliminate a lot of trial and a whole lot of error.
    http://bensboatblog.blogspot.com/
    When peeing over the side,remember,one hand for you,and one hand for the ship.
    Proud Member Of The Elite LPBC.

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