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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #2941
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    After all this time of more than a year, even the shaft zincs are still good.





    The man in charge of the paint shop prefers to not have his picture take on his name mentioned, so I try to be careful that way. But who is he and what does he do?

    Aside from directing the paining projects, he also monitors the boats in the water and pumps them out when needed. Keeping a record of the water levels will obviously show if a boat is leaking, but when you have so many boats to watch, it's easy to not see one that is in trouble. Most boats leak a little, but
    the list shows a trend.

    Emma Berry is one of those that was showing an upward trend.

    After a haul out, a couple of bad pieces were found in need of replacement.





    Meanwhile we paint.

    This is a Whitehall. I don't find anything about in on the Mystic website, but I did on line.



    I was priming the inside.





  2. #2942
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 25, 2021 24th Annual Mystic Car Show.

    Having other obligations this weekend I had Saturday off from my boat. This left time off to go out to see the beautiful antique cars.

    And a tractor.

    This is Scott's new toy.



    Nate brought down the Studebaker engine he had rebuilt a few years ago. It powered a saw mill in northeastern Connecticut when the original dam was destroyed in a storm. It had been water powered until then.



    Radiator cap? He has no idea where it came from, so for now it stays.



    The name of the sawmill was Chamberlin Mill.



    Because it is a non profit museum, the seaport offered it's facilities for the rebuild.

    My coverage of the restoration begins here.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ctive-1/page44


    https://www.chamberlinmill.org/

    Oh yes, the cars.



    Beautiful as always.

    Stanley Steamer







  3. #2943
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    An un-restored barn find.

    Chang the oil, and drive it.





    G.L.P. F.D. stands for Groton Long Point Fire Department, an area of Groton which is near by and across the harbor from New London.



    I got a ride in the Seaport's truck.





    Free rides were being offered.

    The Morgan was already retired when this truck was brand new.



    There were many more cars than I have shown here. Because Covid is still causing trouble, the turnout was smaller than normal, but, "Press on regardless."



  4. #2944
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Thanks for the updates!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  5. #2945
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 30, 2021

    Emma Berry is getting a lot of attention. Caulking, priming, painting, hull work, and others.






    https://www.mysticseaport.org/explor...y-noank-smack/








    I'm not sure what it is, but he was planing it.

    Something on board.





  6. #2946
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The Draken is also getting spruced up.

    Word has it, (As good as the "word" can be) that this is just a maintenance haul out, but the captain is due in next week from Europe, so we'll see.

    My job yesterday was one I always look forward to. Not!

    I Cleaned the bilge on Volunteer, the seaports new aluminum Garvey

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/news/a...-of-volunteer/



    You can't even see the bottom where I reached in to scrub.



    I never met a diesel yet that didn't leak something, somewhere.

    There was some oil on top of the water in the bilge. To help keep the bilge clean, there were "Diapers" under the engine. The diaper material is designed to absorb oil but not the water. The water can be wrung out, but the oil stays put.

    Small boats with small outboards should not usually need this product, but inboards should always have something to absorb oil.

    I'm not trying to pitch a product here, but to understand what it is, look here.

    https://www.amazon.com/New-Pig-Heavy...xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

    Reaching down and grabbing a dirty, oil soaked diaper is just as wonderful as changing a babies diaper. The smell is just as bad, but different.

    Anyway, my gloved hand was covered with oil, so there were no pictures here.

    Under the boat, Brianne (I'm not sure of the spelling) was cleaning up the relatively new four bladed prop.



    It made a big difference in Volunteer's performance moving from the original three blade to this four blade.



    And Ann cleaned.







  7. #2947
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The New Haven sharpie is finally moving along. It's been more than a year sitting in the barn waiting for the work to restart.

    The sharpie is right there in front. Or what's left of it. The keel is original, but not much else will be when it's done.



    https://www.mysticseaport.org/explor...oyster-tonger/

    The holes in the keel were plugged many months ago and now he's shaving them flush.



    The stern.





    Break time.






  8. #2948
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 7, 2021

    Yesterday was tough. I can't remember a day when I was as tired as on the drive home after working on Emma C Berry.

    It was a beautiful day. Warm and bright without a cloud in the sky. And therein lies the problem.

    We were scraping the bulwarks on Emma Berry which are only 18" high. So that means you're on your knees or flat out. Bight and sunny with no breeze made it tough. Laying down or kneeling made it tougher. I took a lot of rests.

    We often kid our selves that we should receive double pay for some jobs. Two times zero still equals zero. (Ha ha) On the other hand when they dock our pay for taking an hour and a half lunch (Lunch is 30 minutes) it's no big deal.

    So, anyway, this is Loring (I think this is the way he spells it.) He is doing what I did all day long. Either on knees or laying down in the hot sun with no breeze.

    I'm glad this wasn't August.



    This is where I started.



    If this were a boat where visitors would coming aboard, just taking off the loose paint and sanding would not be good enough. No matter how much the sanding it was not going to be very pretty. But she sits a few feet of the wharf so the finish will protect the wood. But we did what we could.

    When I was involved with sports cars, we called it a twenty foot finish. Looks great at twenty feet, but....



    My jacket was from when I arrived and it was 55.

    To the lower right is a kevel.

    Merriam Webster says, Kevel, a strong timber, bollard, or cleat (as a cross timber in a bollard or a timber bolted across two stanchions.)

    Who knew. We just call it a clavicle.


    Anyway, that was the hard part of the job. Scraping behind the kevel was tough, sanding was impossible.



    They had to move the anchor.



    Caulking and bottom prep was still going on below.





    She should be going back in the water in about two weeks.

    Here is a book about her.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/news/e...ok-wins-award/






  9. #2949
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wayne had his special job which he seems to love. Any time a window needs work, he's on it. And, he was in the shade.



    A walk through the DuPont Restoration Barn I found more work going on with the New Haven Sharpie. The shipwright was planing the wood added to the keel so I couldn't ask anything about what it is for.



    It almost looks like a worm shoe, but it's not very thick. I'll try to ask next time.

    Up by the second clamp it looks about two inches thick.



    Elsewhere, this will be the next boat out on the ship lift.

    I haven't heard anything about what will be done, but from her overall condition, I'm guessing it will just be a clean up of the hull. it's a beautiful boat.





    And in the machine shop, Scott has a new toy. It dates to about 1932.


  10. #2950
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 14, 2021

    Another beautiful early fall day. The colors here are just starting. I talked with some visitors who had just come from Vermont and they said up there the trees are "On Fire!"

    Checking in with Nate found him boiling another engine part. He started this engine but stopped in May when he had knee work done. Then he went spend the summer in Maine. This was his first time back on this.

    He starts, as always, with rain water and running it through a filter for dirt and then a de-ionizing filter.





    Before he starts to boil the part, he measures the salt content of this (Supposedly) pure rain water. It is about 9 PPM.

    Here is the cylinder. You can see where he has cut away the bad iron that was harmed by the salt.

    After boiling the salt out of the part for days and when the readings on the water are good for salt content, he will take a piece of black iron pipe and reshape it into a patch.

    By heating the section of iron pipe red hot he can duplicate the radius of the cylinder.

    So cnear to the ocean must have something to do with the salt in rainwater.

    Here's the part.



    This is the Crankcase.



    It's a two cylinder, two stroke, semi diesel. It uses a hot bulbs to start using a blowtorch sort of device to heat them. I haven't seen them yet.

    Aside from the injectors, this thing also has a water injection system.

    The block has a repair on the side. The patch is very nicely done, but it's not known by whom or when.



    Nate says it's so well done, he's going to leave it there.

    Here is inside.



  11. #2951
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    It's three main bearing engine. This is the center bearing which he has not taken apart yet.



    It helps to have the manual.



    I never heard of this before. There is a lot of stuff on line about the company.



    Scott is working on a 1950's I/O set up.

    If I remember this correctly, it's a Hercules engine with Norseman Marine parts on each end driving a Volvo out drive.

    Scott knows the block is Hercules because the name is on the face of each valve.



    That's the out drive on the right. Sorry, lousy picture of that.



    Quentin has retired from the shipyard but now works up in the mill building two days a week. He gets a new office and a new desk.

    Anne has been oiling it.

    This is the bottom.




  12. #2952
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Help was given to turn it over.



    The top.



    Her other job was to clean the tar pot.





    I asked her, "Why bother?"

    I bought her a new one during lunch. $6.00

    Loring was paintin Emma Berry. my job was to sweep the decks on the Morgan. After Wayne went home I glazed another paint shop
    window. No pictures of either of those wonderful jobs.

    But one benefit to working some of these jobs is meeting great people.

    Here are two.



    The are from Missouri and some other nearby state which I have forgotten. They have been friends for years. Both have been farmers and one was a Mack truck salesman. They have been traveling all over the northeast and had been at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome the day before.

    I mention this because there is so much to do here. While
    Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome is not truly near, when you come to Connecticut, this is another place to see.

    https://oldrhinebeck.org/

    They took a half hour ride in a vintage biplane and shared this video of flying over the Hudson River.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hpmd4SOU7OA

  13. #2953
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I just received a text from Nate asking for help.



    He wrote,


    Hi Carl

    When you write about the M&W engine in your blog, could you ask if anyone knows of an engine registry for these engines? Ours is # 2906. Any information about these engines would be much appreciated.

    Nate

    Anyone?



  14. #2954
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 21, 2021

    Black Knight had been hauled out and
    moved over to make room for Roseway which is coming out today or Monday. The ship lift and ramp looked like a runway.



    At 8:00 it looked like the above and at 3:00 this had been put together. Each center block is set at a height to match Roseway's keel.



    Roseway needs more work so she's back again. She left us last year in May.

    This is from last May.



    Black Night is reported to be a former New York Yacht Club committee boat used back in the 12 meter Americas Cup Race days.

    All I have heard so far is that she will be getting a bow thruster installed.

    Apparently she was built in 1968 and I am assuming the stabilizers were added later.










  15. #2955
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    ALWAYS enjoy seeing these posts

    MANY THANKS

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  16. #2956
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1





    In the engine shop, Nate showed me a new air compressor. (Old, but new to us.)

    The Atlas engine uses air pressure to start. Through valving, air is used to push down the pistons and get the flywheel turning. The the air is turned off and the inertia of the flywheel starts the diesel.

    The Atlas and Nate.



    We have been using electrically powered air compressors but out at sea, that's not really an option.

    So this is the gasoline powered air compressor made by, and for, the Atlas engine.



    It's two cylinders, one is the cylinder engine, and the other one is the compressor.



    Nate says it seems to have low compression. It will start, but won't keep running.



    He'll fix that.

    He wants to put it out with the Atlas and use it in the display for starting.


  17. #2957
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Loring and I were on the Morgan. Wayne was glazing windows.

    Loring was refinishing the fo'c'sle entryway.



    I pushed a broom.

    I did this last week too. It's amazing how much gets tracked on in a week. I'm not talking about dusty dirt, but small pebbles too.



    Rod painted.



    And Barbara took time off from her regular job to help clean out pumpkins.

    And not just a few pumpkins.










  18. #2958
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1


  19. #2959
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 28, 2021

    Roseway is out of the water.



    Her caulking is being attended to.



    I'm not sure how they know what needs a redo, but the stain to the left might have been a clue.

    Reefing.



    On the starboard side a plank is getting replaced. That's the new one in front.

    Right now they are setting up the clamps to hold it in place while fastening it to the hull.



    Black Knight is supposed to be getting a bow thruster, but nothing appears to have been started yet. In the stern, the rudders are out. The bushings and shafts need attention as do the packing seals.



    It was dropped from inside on a line to lower it slowly.





  20. #2960
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Every one keeps busy.

    Rod and Brianna were reestablishing a waterline.





    Wayne was back at the windows again.



    Anne was painting these panels which will have multiple electric outlets and circuit breakers when done.



    Pooped?



    Back on the Morgan prepping for paint.



  21. #2961
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I had a fun job.

    A problem with a ship like the Morgan is that she is not manned by a full crew. Usually the only person on board is an interpreter who greets visitors.

    So, the aft store room behind the wheel hasn't been attended to for several weeks.

    No big deal, but the mold got out of hand.

    So, my job for the day was to clean it up.



    This is before.



    During.



    And after.



    And I am a happy camper.



    You can see there is more to do.



    The next step will be to rewash the surface with some kind of disinfectant to prevent it from coming back. At least for a while. (We hope.)



  22. #2962
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Up forward, Tom is getting the winch ready to be taken off for rebuilding.

    This was rebuilt in the 1980's and now needs it again. (No kidding.)





    He explained that it sits for months without being turned and water seeps in and finally it starts to rot. In use, as it turns water to run out.

    A crane will be here tomorrow to lift it off. It will also be taking the masts off of Brilliant for the winter.


    In the machine shop, Scott is working on his engine and outdrive.

    It's a Hercules engine with Norseman Marine parts on each end driving a Volvo outdrive.

    Last time I showed this I didn't have a good view of the out-drive.



    He's about to put the head back on with new studs.



    One last picture. When I arrived in the morning I expected to find this cylinder boiling in water in front of the engine shop. But it was in the rear using a different scheme.

    He needs to get the salt out of the iron. Reading more about the process he found that using an electric current can do a much better job.

    He has done this before but only to remove excess rust. It turns out, rust is not the only thing taken out. Every couple of hours he removes the anode/cathode and cleans off the rust from it. But now he also takes a salt reading. Every couple of hours the salt level in the water gets higher and higher.

    When the salt level is stable he will be able to weld the cylinder patch in place and the part will be stable.

    This is the bath.



  23. #2963
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    November 4, 2021

    Last week, Nate was "cooking" the front cylinder of the engine he is rebuilding. Salt plays a terrible trick on iron and after many years the iron absorbs enough salt to do a lot of damage.

    Last week's cylinder is done and now he's going to "cook" some of the parts of the water jacket. It's not very often he has parts like these. He usually has to fabricate new ones out of iron pipe.

    Each part is wired separately to a common positive wire. The negative wire is attached to an iron cathode. (Or is it an anode?) See last week for a picture of it then.



    When done he will weld it all back together again.

    Meanwhile at the other end of the shop is a new donation.

    A 1926 Model T ford "Depot Hack Station Wagon."



    It's in beautiful condition.










  24. #2964
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    It not only looks good, but it runs well too.



    In the far seat is one of the seaport shipwrights, Scott. Scott is a long time owner of a model T. I met his father at a Mystic car show a few years ago and he told me that the day Scott was born, he went down to the DMV and transferred the ownership of his Model T into Scott's name. Neat Dad!

    In the near seat is Chris Gasiorek, Vice President for Watercraft Preservation and Programs.



    Fun ride. They just took a ride around the campus.


    Roseway was launched first thing in the morning.

    At this point the lift is down about six inches. Usually what happens is the boat gets lowered down to wet the bottom and to check for leaks. It was almost break time so I assumed when I got back, they would lower her the rest of the way.

    Not this time. When I got back she was tied up on the dock.






    Oh well, I've reported lots of launches. Next time I'll do better.

    Morgan's davits are getting attention.

    This one is having new spaces carved out for the pulleys. This davit will be a little short, but still usable.







  25. #2965
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Now that Roseway is in the water, the cradle needs to be taken apart.







    I have never heard any figures on what it costs to get a boat like Roseway or Black Knight out of the water, but it must be quite a lot. Look at the setup needed to cradle a wooden hull. Plus add the divers needed to move the stanchions into place and center the hull.

    That's a lot of person power and person hours. Too bad a travel lift won't work.

    Black Knight's rudders are in the paint shop.

    They are all Bronze. But there is a problem. There is salt water inside. They are not solid bronze, but a plug has not been found yet. There is some damage on the rudder where the shaft enters the rudder and the water leaks out from it.



    The stuffing boxes are going to get new seals.

    It's an ugly, messy job. I did it on my boat years ago with the rudders still in place. Yuk!



    Black Knight is supposed to be getting a bow thruster installed. But it has not arrived yet. She may need to go back in the water without it because Mayflower will be back right after Thanks Giving. May Flower will be wintering here.

    Wayne and I glazed the paint shop windows. Hey, we had fun.

  26. #2966
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    November 11, 2021

    A few months ago, I brought a 1965 Century Coronado out to the seaport to see if it could be restored and taken into the seaports collection. For now, it sits. I never covered it up. Now is the time.

    This was when I got it ready for the trip out to the seaport.



    Wayne and I spent all day building a frame and covering it.

    I had to pump it out first. Some tome ago I put a lot of salt in the hull to help keep fresh water from rotting the wood. Seems to have worked, the hull seems in good condition.

    We had put several tons of salt between the frames on the Morgan during its restoration.




    I was too busy to take pictures.



    These tarps are OK, but not a really great way to do the job.



    I hope next week I will have some shrink wrap and can make it more secure.

    For now....


    Wayne said, "Look intelligent."



    I tried.

    It ain't pretty, but it will do for the short haul. We're due a lot of rain today and this weekend so this will help.






  27. #2967
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The boat is located at the north end parking lot behind the mill building. We finished at about 2:30 and it was too late to go back to the shipyard and start another project.

    So I went over to the Schaefer Building to see a new exhibit.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/explor...s/sea-as-muse/

    Most of these silver items are trophies for yacht races from about 1870 to 1900 and on.



    Beautiful things. All sterling silver.











    https://www.mysticseaport.org/press-...nique-objects/


    From the above.



    One of the elegant trophies has a unique background in that it was a very expensive insult! In big regattas during the late 1800s, it was common to give the owners of losing yachts a presentation piece as recognition of their participation. However, the Livonia trophy was awarded by anonymous Americans in London who clearly intended to mock the Livonia’s owner.


    It commemorates the results of a yachting challenge to the New York Yacht Club by James Ashbury of England, who was determined to win the America’s Cup for the Royal Harwich Yacht Club. In a series of 5 races in October 1871, Ashbury’s Livonia competed against 2 American yachts, winning just 1 race against the Columbia. Ashbury contested the result but after an investigation, the New York Yacht Club affirmed its original decision. This trophy was not awarded by the New York Yacht Club however, as the engraving tells us that it was commissioned and presented to Ashbury by “Americans in London” as acknowledgment of Ashbury’s single win. The fact that it only mentions 1 win out of 5 and that both Ashbury’s name and the name of his yacht were misspelled all point towards this trophy being one very expensive insult. The figures on top of the cup further suggest this, as the standing figure is Columbia, representing the United States, and the figure that kneels before her is Britannia, representing Great Britain. These two figures were depicted frequently in art and political cartoons that aimed to show that both nations were equally great, however on this trophy, Britannia shows subservience to Columbia—a subtle but clear suggestion of Britain’s—and Ashbury’s—inferiority.



    Unsurprisingly, Ashbury refused the cup and it was returned to the unknown Americans who gave it to him.

    Nice to have money.






  28. #2968
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    November 18, 2021

    We always go for a quick breakfast first thing in the morning. On this day, we had a guest.

    Peter Armstrong, the new president of Mystic Seaport Museum
    .

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/press-release/mystic-seaport-museum-names-peter-armstrong-president/



    Nice guy.


    Back in the shipyard, Black Knight is getting a bow thruster added.

    This company specializes in installing bow thrusters.

    http://www.newenglandbowthruster.com/home.html




    They arrived later in the day so all they were able to do, before I left, was unpack and get set up for the thruster which is coming in from Europe somewhere by air freight.

    In the morning our crew was painting the bottom.





    The rudders are back in place.



    At the end of the day, the bottom was painted except for where the thruster will go.



  29. #2969
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Black Knight is a great boat. I got invited aboard in Newport many years ago. We had a beer and I think the Hermes bottle opener was worth more than my boat. It was an eye splice - in silver. The captain was telling us about riding out Hurricane Hugo while anchored way up in Narragansett Bay.

  30. #2970
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    I talked with one of the guys and he said it will take about a week to install. So it will be done before I get back to the seaport. Thanks Giving day is next Thursday so Black Knight will most likely be gone by the time I am back.

    Meanwhile, since Black Knight is a paying customer, we volunteers are not able to participate. The seaport won't charge for volunteer time on a paying customers project.

    So, it's back to glazing windows.

    Hey, we still have fun.

    This guy walked up and said he retired from 45 years of glazing windows this week. And now he runs into us doing it.

    He is on a road trip to Maine and will tour the country from there.



    I didn't realize I was also taking a selfie.


    After lunch, Wayne left for the day and I went aboard Firefighter.

    The volunteer office put out a request for volunteers to help with various jobs on Firefighter. If your more or less local, they are looking for people to act as tour guides on the boat and also people to do mechanical repairs.

    You can call or e-mail. Ask for the volunteer office.

    860-572-0711
    860-572-071
    info@mysticseaport.org

    I'm not exactly local. It's a one hour drive on I-95, but I'm not alone in driving an hour. Nate lives in northern Connecticut and is also an hour away. Barbara is about 45 minutes. Wayne is the exception. He can see the seaport from his house. (When the leaves are down and he's in his attic.)

    On board Firefighter, I met Charlie. Right now, it's pretty much a one man show while the boat is in Mystic. He does everything on board Firefighter, "America's fire boat."

    http://americasfireboat.org/

    Charlie.



    The job I helped with was taking the aluminum "launch" and hoisting it aboard.

    Charlie was turning the manual wheel to lift the boat out of the water. There is an electric motor and he was finally able to get it to work. By hand, as he was cranking in the picture above, it raised the boat by 1/4 inch with each crank. The motor made it much better.

    But first things first. The engine needed to be set up for storage. So additive went into the tank and then it had to be started. It only took about 100 pulls. Ugh!








  31. #2971
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Then it was time to crank the hoist over along side of the hull. This one has no working motor.



    Finally on board it was time to tie it down.



    Charlie showed me around.

    His tool chest.



    My grandfather had a sign in his office. "A place for everything, and nothing in it's place." That would be charlies tool box. He has people who "Forget" to put back tools.

    The Coast Guard Cadets show up and do odd jobs. The engines are getting a new paint job.

    The elbows on the engine have been painted.



    The Coasties are also doing work here.



    It will go back on here.





  32. #2972
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    I asked why the flag was at half mast. I don't generally listen to the news very often, so I figured I had missed something.

    Sadly, Charlie had to put down Boo Boo, one of the three cats on board Firefighter. They are three rescues that just showed up and Boo Boo was the oldest that came on board when Charlie did some years ago. Charlie said he was as much of the crew as anyone else.



    So long Boo Boo.


  33. #2973
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    December 2, 2021

    Every year the seaport follows a tradition used by ships in harbors from the 19th century. Perhaps even from time before that.

    Every year, each boat in the water has a tree mounted high on board if it was to be in port over Christmas.

    The supply.



    Mayflower is back.

    I don't know what she needs this time.



    I thought Black Knight would have been done and gone by now, but all there is now is a pair of holes. Probably a lot of work went into those two holes. She needs to be done and gone so Mayflower can come out.



    Morgan's windless is in the shipyard now and stripped of the bad wood.



    Some of the iron and other parts from it are in the paint shop.



    A lot of small boats are getting attention. I haven't heard why.

    Wait and see.



  34. #2974
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Transom work.





    The New Haven Sharpie is finally getting some work done.

    There won't be much of the original left when it's done.



    At this pint you can't even tell what it will look like.



    Since there hasn't been a lot to do for a while now, Wayne and I answered the call to volunteer on Fire Fighter.

    This is the man in charge.

    Charlie.



    Our first job was to put the anchor line below. Charlie had taken it out to inspect it. It's in good shape.

    Wayne fed it to me and I dropped it down below.




  35. #2975
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    Charlie is looking for volunteers too. (So is the seaport) This makes it obvious.





    There is another one inside.



    You get to play with the big toys.

    Inside there is a picture of what it had been. These are water nozzles from some years ago.



    That was then, this is now.

    I'm guessing they are too valuable to leave behind when the boat was retired.





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