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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #2486
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    When I worked in a wheel weight casting shop, the pigs we got the metal in had the ears like shown above. The weight of each was 85 pounds.

  2. #2487
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 18, 2018

    Big day!

    Mayflower II Shutter Plank Day!

    When the last plank goes on a hull it's a turning point that is celebrated by the entire crew. While a lot of work is still needed, this is the final piece of the hull.

    The plank is placed against the frames and clamped down.

    At this point the forward end is in place but not fastened.



    On signal, the entire crew starts bending the plank into place.



    Clamping and wedges drive the plank hard against the frames.



    All along the length of the plank, the crew bends their piece of the plank.



    Even before the rest of the plank is in place, holes are drilled to accept the spikes that will fasten the plank.



    The locations are premarked to follow the frames.




  3. #2488
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Ready?




    Wait a sec.



    A little blessing of the spike. A tradition.



    Drive it home!



    Party time.

    Quentin made a toast thanking the Seaport crew, Plimoth Plantation crew, and even the original people who came to America on Mayflower I.






  4. #2489
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    With months still to go, it was time to go back to work.

    Anne and I scraped off excess bedding compound that squeezed out from under the new decking.



    New decking is going on overhead in the stern.





    Anne approves.



    There are only 15 more futtocks that need to be installed. Here, Chris is trimming for the next one.



    In the bow, the decking is in place and bungs are getting trimmed.



  5. #2490
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    Down on the ground, these will be two new masts.



    They will be painted so only we will know.



    Another neat trick, although probably centuries old, is to reinforce the parts between futtocks with trunnels. The penciled lines show where the futtocks will go. The grain runs along the length so the wood between the futtock locations would be subject to failure.




    Okay, it's time to continue the Shutter Plank party.

    Whit made up the patties.



    Jeff cut up the sausage.





  6. #2491
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The grill was hot.



    The crew was hungry.



    And as always, grilling indoors presents its own set of problems.



    The big doors were opened and the air was cleared.



    Finally, my wife said pack you bag, we're going on a cruise.

    So, I'm off next week going north to Newport, Boston, Bar harbor, and other foreign and exotic ports of the north.

    We won't be seeing any palm trees on this cruise.



    Wayne is still in Florida helping hurricane victims. I texted him and he was too busy to talk. He said he was up to his a... in alligators.

    So I don't know if he'll be back even when I get back the following week.

    We'll see.






  7. #2492
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    November 1, 2018

    Wayne and I are both back. Wayne has a cold, so I worked alone on Kingston II. While I was away, the doors were replaced on the wheelhouse after they were refinished. The white shrink wrap tape used to cover the openings didn't come off completely so that was the first job. Once the tape was off I had to remove the glue that remained. Mineral spirits did the job. A little painting and most of my day was done.

    That was my actual work for the day. The non working part is far more interesting. This day would be watching Nate working on a new engine.

    But more on that in a minute.

    I have my vacation pictures to share.

    We left New York for a week long cruise starting in Brooklyn, NY. The pier is along side Governors Island in New York Harbor. While I'm sure there are other equally beautiful harbors, this is "our harbor!"



    Just up the East River, I can see where this building might be a real problem for marine traffic. It's not one of those buildings that focuses a beam of light to start fires, but you could miss seeing the other guy pretty easily.







    The sundown was beautiful.



    The next day was Newport, Rhode Island. We just walked around a bit.

    We found the Sailing School Vessel Oliver Hazard Perry.



    It wasn't open, nor could we get on the dock for a closer look. I had to come home to read up on it.

    https://www.ohpri.org/ship/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Hazard_Perry





  8. #2493
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We found a shop that sells scrimshaw, real and copies. This model of Morgan was for sale.



    If it is something you can't live without, it's only $15,000. But it's made with whale bone.

    As best I could figure, the mansions are farther to the east, but this will do. It's an inn called Castle Hill Inn.



    The next day was Boston.

    Our ship went out and around Block Island, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and Cape Cod. I imagine the ship is too big for the Cape Cod Canal. Regal Princess draws 28 feet and that's just about the canal's limit. Add to that, the QE-2 hit a rock not far from there that did extensive hull damage in august of 1992. It's not nice to hit rocks. Take my word for it, I know!

    So, rounding Cape Cod I could make out the Province Town Pilgrim Monument.



    Entering Boston Harbor.



    We spent days around Boston in 2014 when we were with the Morgan on the 38th voyage and this is sort of home turf. So I didn't take many pictures. But I did find this building interesting.



    I don't think this would do in San Francisco.

    Next stop, Bar Harbor, Maine. Pronounced Baa Habaaa.

    The ship anchored and we ferried in.






  9. #2494
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Very picturesque but the rest of where we walked was like so many other tourist areas. Tons of shops selling mostly all the same thing.



    Our next stop was supposed to be St. Johns, Canada. The wind was over 40 knots and the tide was not going to cooperate so we had to pass on it.



    This ship gave it up before we did.



    So we went on to our last stop in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

    Halifax is a port with some real history. The largest man made explosion ever (Until the atomic bombs in WW-II) happened in 1917 when a munitions ship blew up.

    The long version.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFg8ANIlOBw

    The short version.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4cJBf2ECKk

    It happened at 9:05 on December 6, 1917 and ever since, the clock on city hall has been stuck at 9:05.

    Another tragedy did not happen in Halifax, but the city was the closest port to it. The Titanic went down in 1911 and Halifax played a role. Many of the unidentified victims are buried in Halifax.

    The Maritime Museum has Titanic artifacts on display.

    The ships that went to recover bodies also picked up some of the debris from the wreck.

    This is an original deck chair.




    This is a replica you can try out. My wife said it was very comfortable.



    Some of the ornate carvings were recovered.

    One is a replica you can touch.





    https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/

  10. #2495
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Model engines and ships.







    First order Fresnel lens.

    I found this.

    https://uslhs.org/fresnel-lens-order...ties-and-costs



    A life preserver from WW-II.



    As you can see, everything is in English and French.


    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #2496
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    It took two days to get home from Halifax and we arrived in New York City before sunup.



    The weather was not perfect but it was warm enough.



    So it was a nice trip. It rained a lot but it wasn't too cold. I would like to get back to St Johns someday.

    The limo driver who dropped us off, dropped a bomb shell at 8:00 that morning. He couldn't make it. Well that's why they rent cars. The bad thing? Now I have to find a new limo company. You know, fool me once.....

    So on to Mystic Seaport.








  12. #2497
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Those chairs are comfortable! here is one I built a few years ago plans were in Handyman magazine I think.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Simmons Sea Skiff build photos here:
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/vxuQDZI0Dz7qjzAx1

  13. #2498
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I took the weekend off from this thread. This is a continuation from last week.

    As I mentioned last week, we finished our cruise to Canada and now are home.

    Wayne had a cold, but is now home from Florida where he worked with the Red Cross.

    As I drove into the yard, I see the Viking ship has returned for the winter.



    This year they have removed the dragon's head from the bow. (Or whatever that thing is.)

    In the engine shop, Nate has a new toy.

    The engine is in pristine condition. All the bare metal parts are rust free and covered with Cosmoline.

    It was donated by one of the engine show attendees who brings a lot of his own engines every year.

    It's two cycle, and two cylinder at 23HP. (I think)







    There is a reason the name may look familiar. If you have ever searched for an air horn for your boat, Kahlenberg shows up.

    https://www.kahlenberg.com/products/...ng-yacht-horns

    The engine is a semi diesel which means it needs extra heat, like a glow plug, to start it. In this case, there is a rod, probably bronze or a copper alloy, that is heated and the heat transfers into the combustion chamber to ignite the fuel.

    To start it, there is a preheat torch mounted on each head.



    In the video, Nate is just warming things up. He spun the engine over before heat was applied. Then he ignited the preheaters. The fire got just a little out of hand and Nate asked for a welding glove. But he got the wrong glove and had to get the other one. Then he was able to fine tune the preheat.

    During this time, Scott noticed that the back side of the preheat chamber wasn't open so you see him pointing to it. This flapper allows the fire to cross the head and exit thorough its own exhaust set up. When running I imagine both flappers (Or gates) will be closed to keep the hot bulb from cooling off.

    Later in the day he tried to start it, but there was a fuel problem. So, next week is another day.






  14. #2499
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Also in the shop, the guys who try to keep the old Ford truck running have found that the gas tank was really messed up inside. Being inventive, they solved the problem with a small cement mixer.

    Well, of course they did!

    The tank was mounted on the front of the mixer and a pile of stones was added.





    After a suitable time of churning, the tank had to be vacuumed out.





    It worked slick!

    In the machine shop, Dean is making new chain plates for Mayflower II. Here he is adding a bevel to the outside.





  15. #2500
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    On board the Mayflower II, the framework that will support a lower forward deck is trued up.





    Checking for flatness.





  16. #2501
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    November 8, 2018

    Dean called me outside to see his handy work. He has finished machining the chain plates for Mayflower II and is bending them. They are heated, bent, and cooled.

    These are still hot.





    He bent them while red on the arbor press.



    Nate tried to get the Kahlenberg engine to start with no luck. He made up an adapter to go into the glow plug hole so he could do a compression test. He got 100 pounds in both cylinders. 100 pounds OK for a low compression gasoline engine, but doesn't come close to what you might expect in a diesel. So he took the heads off to have a look.

    I'm not quite sure how this works, but the injector spays fuel into this cavity in the head where it ignites. The fire then rushes down into the cylinder.





    This is the underside of the head.



  17. #2502
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    Now that's a piston.





    The engine came with spares all laid out in this brand new box.

    Even a tap set.



    In the paint shop, Susan was varnishing a helm chair.



    It goes on this boat. It mounts outside behind the wheel. You can see the dark area where it used to sit behind the wheel.





    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #2503
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    In the barn, the lathe has been cleaned off so the Mayflower II mast can be turned.



    Anne has been sealing up checks in Mayflower II's bowsprit.



    That is a very handy caulking gun. Just pull the trigger.

    It's nice when the Boss pitches in. The Boss is Whit, captain of Mayflower II.







  19. #2504
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1





    During lunch I walked to the volunteer office to turn in my hours. I average about 50 hours a month between getting dirty and this thread.

    Found Morgan looking pristine.



    There is a reason she always looks great. Someone is always working on her.



    Wayne and I were working on Kingston II again. Wayne was glazing the windows and I was painting trim and cleaning the radar.



    If you look closely, you can see we are both clipped to the boat with our harnesses.








  20. #2505
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    November 15, 2018

    A couple of weeks ago I volunteered to have the old dinghy that I donated to the seaport, painted.

    Before.





    After.



    I have known Ted for 25 years and he has done a few other jobs for me in the past. No fender bender damage, rather he does beautiful work on more interesting cars.

    As he finishes up, the car behind him is an early sixties Plymouth Fury.

    Boats are not his normal thing, but he's the only one I know who owns an Amphicar.

    http://www.amphicar.com/

    I had a ride in one years ago. When ted asks if I would like to ride in his, I politely decline the offer. One small wake and you're done.




    Using an old sweatshirt to keep the new sweatshirt clean as he polishes the paint.

    The inside will remain the original unpainted fiberglass.



    The seats and oars have already been refinished.

  21. #2506
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Back to the seaport.



    Quentin wanted a gang
    of us to unload it so the finish would be undamaged. Two can pick it up easily.



    Some of the guys are not keen on having their pictures taken. I try to avoid them, but sometimes I can't.





    So now the hardware needs to go back on. Sometime in the future the seaport is planning on an exhibit documenting the change from wood to fiberglass and aluminum in small boats. Since this is a very early example of fiberglass it will be part of the exhibit.

    More on this when I know more.



    Back in the machine shop, Nate has honed the cylinders on the Kahlenberg engine and is putting it back together.

    He's using the over head crane to lower the piston into bore. You can see the top of the piston on the left.




    Connecting the connecting rod to the crank.



    Yesterday Nate rented an air compressor that
    will put out 175 psi. He needed that much to start the engine in Gerda III.

    Well, he reports, it went very well.

    After a few glitches it started right up and ran very smoothly. He started it three times. Now to complete the job, he needs to install and air cylinder on the boat. They recently had one made, but it still needs certification.




  22. #2507
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Also in the shop, Dean has been making chain plates for Mayflower II. Here is one that he is attaching a chain to.



    In the paint shop, Susan is varnishing Annie, Mystic Seaport Museum's very first boat.





    It would appear that next up for Mayflower II is gun-ports.



    Next week is Thanksgiving.

    We all have a lot to do ahead of this holiday so I'll be back in two weeks.

    I hope yours is wonderful.



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