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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #2311
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    thank you for the updates.keep them coming

  2. #2312
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    December 18, 2017


    Here is some extra reading for you.





    After I posted the picture of the pedal powered boat that had crossed the Atlantic, Nate did some exploring and found this.

    https://www.si.com/vault/1992/12/28/...record-40-days


    And another one with a few more details.

    http://www.chickensoup.com/book-stor...r-the-atlantic

    Now on a different subject,

    "Don't give up the ship!"

    We all know it but I imagine few of us know the origin. Sadly, it's not quite as wonderful as "I have not yet begun to fight."

    "As the mortally wounded Captain James Lawrence of the US frigate Chesapeake lay dying in his cabin, his crew locked in hand-to-hand combat on the quarterdeck above, he is alleged to have uttered the memorable words: “Don’t give up the ship!”"

    Here is the story.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/20...1BP/story.html

    But, as we all know John Paul Jones had a different outcome.

    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/johnpauljones.htm



  3. #2313
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    December 20, 2017

    I had nothing to do this day. Wayne will be home soon and Anne was away too. So I just hung out giving a hand where I could.

    Nate found NOS (new old stock) parts for the Wisconsin engine. An air filter manifold and a somewhat different style of gas tank that works well anyway.





    Later on he played with the levers as it ran.



    Meanwhile Scott was installing a block heater in the new engine in the Clark forklift truck.



    Because the method for holding it in place was so poor, he added a sealant to help secure it in place.



    On the way to morning coffee, I found a couple of guys painting the new doors on the pole barn. This is where we painted all the lead ballast for the Morgan a few years ago.

    No big deal really, but I was just hanging around most of the day.



    On to coffee.


  4. #2314
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    One project I actually got to help on was removing the trailer from under Gramp. The Gramp's bottom needs some work in a couple of places and then it will need bottom paint.

    Step one was to lower the trailer hitch raising the stern. Then raise the supports aft.



    Bring in the forklift with a long boom and pick up the bow.





    Gently lift.



    Carefully roll out the trailer.





    Re-block the hull and you're done.



  5. #2315
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Before I went home, I helped Nate start the Wolverine engine.



    Hook up the air hose to turn over the engine.



    And light the fires.



    Nate had recently made new springs for the fuel injectors. When the engine started it was spitting fire and smoke. Well, it always smokes, but I have never seen the "pop off valves" let go like this. I'm not sure of the proper term, but the purpose is to let off excessive combustion pressure as it's running.

    I asked Nate if it was the new springs that cause it to run this way, and he did not have an answer for it. Once it got going it all settled down somewhat.



    I didn't come out smelling like a rose.


  6. #2316
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    What was the Wolverine engine in originally? Are there plans for it?

  7. #2317
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    December 23, 2017

    The Wolverine came out of a local boat called Flora.

    I wrote to Nate and he just replied:

    "The boat was called "Flora". It was built in 1905 with a steam engine. We believe it was re-powered in 1926 with the Wolverine engine. It was an oyster-dagger.

    The picture was taken in the 1999 Antique Boat Parade at Mystic Seaport."



    Our man Jim took this picture. Jim owned an auto electric business in New London so he knew "Everybody." He will be 90 in March, so he has a lot of people he's known and worked with over the decades. All the local boats needed him at one time or another.



    The wolverine will probably go in place of the
    Wichmann engine. The Wichmann was built in Norway and is a beautiful engine. It's also a real crowd pleaser when running. But, there is limited space available to display running engines in the shipyard. So considering that Mystic Seaport is the "The Museum of America and the Sea," Wichmann will go into storage and Wolverine will go here. Or at least that's the current plan.

    Here is John getting ready to start the Wichmann during an engine show a couple of years ago.

    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 12-24-2017 at 01:31 PM.

  8. #2318
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    December 26, 2017

    Wayne is home from California. It's good to see him again.

    Because of the holidays, there was nothing for us to work on, so we hung around. We were there if needed, but....

    Harry on the right is retiring on Friday. He has worked in the paint shop for almost twenty years. We're going to miss him.



    Just keeping warm and watching Walt work on Gramp.



    He said he pulled out some putty and decided the rest of the caulking needed attention.





    Outside, Frank is still working on Mayflower II's knight heads.

    This is one being replaced.



    Here he's drilling from both sides for the pin the sheaves will run on.





  9. #2319
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I didn't see how he started this, but I saw him later using a magnetic drill press on a steel plate clamped to the top. With a good surface to work from he drilled with a pilot from both sides and had an almost perfect match up.

    Here he is counter boring a one inch hole to match the shaft diameter.



    Now onto the other side.



    I looked through the hole. The alignment was perfect.

    Being so cold, we went back into the paint shop where Roger is adding plumbing to a work boat.






    I took a walk to Mayflower II. Not much changed since two weeks ago down here.

    Looking forward.



    Looking aft.



  10. #2320
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Two decks up, there are new deck beams.



    They are dripping with shellac to protect the wood.



    This white beam is upside down right now. Louie is outside on a scaffold working on the end.





    Looking aft on the main deck.



    Looking forward.





  11. #2321
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I'm not sure whether Anne or her husband sent this. I am also not sure if it's sunrise or sunset. But it's cold and beautiful. They are living very near the water and just east of Mystic. They often walk their dogs on the beach.



    So, one last thing to share for 2017, I received this card from Barbara.

    However to fully understand it, read this.

    https://educators.mysticseaport.org/.../dazzle_ships/

    In the new Thompson building there was a display that demonstrated and explained "Dazzle." However, museum displays are ever changing and this one is coming down now.

    Also, Barbara went out west to see the eclipse of the sun earlier this year. This, along with her dazzle, is Barbra watching the eclipse.

    The card.

    Inside the card opened up.



    On the left is Barbara standing in front of part of the dazzle display.

    Can you see why we love her?

    Happy New Year.

  12. #2322
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 3, 2018

    By some standards it's not so bad. But around here, it's cold. Really cold. The wind doesn't help. At my house it was 7 degrees. (-14C)
    The outside temperature showing on my trucks screen showed 2 degrees at one point during the commute. (-17C) I called Tampa Florida this morning and was told it's 35 there. Jeez! I go to Florida to get warm.

    Then there's our friends who take a dip on New Years Day! ???

    At the seaport no one is working outside for very long. The river is not completely iced over, but in a few more days like this, it will be.



    The old Garvey needed to come out. I think there's a leak. So one of the few things done outside was a haul out.



    The other thing was to shovel snow off the dock. This was our job.







    Thankfully, this job didn't take very long.


  13. #2323
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A new part of Mayflower II's stem is going in. I took these two pictures and headed inside.





    In the shop, Frank continues making a knighthead.



    Another knee blank.



    And lastly, on this abbreviated work day, we went to the paint shop and found Anne cleaning the prop shaft on Gramp. The bottom was supposed to get painted in the afternoon.





    It was a short day. Wayne and I met Barbara and Steve at McQuade's for two hour lunch and then we went home.

    I pitch Mystic Seaport all the time, but there is so much more in the immediate area. One is McQuade's.
    McQuade's is a grocery store where we sometimes go for lunch during the winter. They have a cafeteria with a fireplace and many tables for "Fine Dining."

    I offer this as an inexpensive way to have lunch if you're on a budget when you visit. Shoot, just sitting in front of a fireplace in the cold of winter is special.

    They have three locations but I believe Mystic is the only one with a galley.

    http://www.mcquadesmarket.com/galley-mystic.php

    Enjoy!





  14. #2324
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 9, 2018

    It snowed last week. It was very cold too with temperatures over the weekend in negative territory. Nate, who lives up near Massachusetts saw -12 degrees.

    Work may slow, but it doesn't stop. Those who can't be inside plod on.







    The dust collects in this hopper and times it needs to be emptied. This is the end of the duct work for the shop.

    They strap onto the whole box and carry it over to the dumpster.



    But the dust settles and Dylan driving the fork lift had to give it a shake.



    Our job for the day was shoveling. Not too much though.



    We're just opening up a pathway.

  15. #2325
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We also helped reset an ice eater. If the lines are not set far enough apart, the torque of the prop will tie the lines up and raise it high enough to become ineffective. It needs to be deep where there is warmer water to keep the area ice free. Someone was inside loosening the lines so Doug could haul it out. Later he added a third line to secure it.



    Back to shoveling. We helped John make a path for the lift truck. The pile behind him is live oak for Mayflower II knees. He told us that some of the knees that looked sort of OK for reuse are now going to be replaced.



    In the barn, the knee department.



    Frank is still working on the night head, the weather has slowed things down a lot.



    This is a beautiful pile of wood. It came from an old pier in Groton. Not sure what it will be used for right now. My uneducated guess is it's long leaf yellow pine and perfectly clear.



    I believe this will will be a waterway on Mayflower II's deck.

    It's about to go outside into the steam box.



  16. #2326
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The steam was on for a while before the came out with the waterway.





    A four inch thickness requires four hours of steam.



    There are two lifeboats from the Conrad. A couple of years ago we stripped and repainted the other one. For now, Gramp is in our way. The bottom is repaired, re-calked, and has a coat of bottom paint. The guys are now refinishing her topsides. Once done we'll have a winter project to keep us going.

    Gramp.



    Conrad's other lifeboat.

    Looks kind of sad, doesn't it? Not the boat, where she sits in the snow.




  17. #2327
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Been a very cold stretch of weather for sure here in New England, the longest cold snap I can remember in my 40 odd years. Are those work areas heated at all?

    My family and I spent last weekend in Ludlow, VT. and temps were in the negatives Saturday and Sunday morning. The hardcore skiers made due and hit the slopes. Myself, I volunteered stay on the couch, read a book and tend the fireplace while they were gone.

  18. #2328
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Quote Originally Posted by 80OldCS View Post
    Been a very cold stretch of weather for sure here in New England, the longest cold snap I can remember in my 40 odd years. Are those work areas heated at all?

    My family and I spent last weekend in Ludlow, VT. and temps were in the negatives Saturday and Sunday morning. The hardcore skiers made due and hit the slopes. Myself, I volunteered stay on the couch, read a book and tend the fireplace while they were gone.
    I live nine miles from Ludlow and was skiing at Okemo today. Great weather. No way would I have skied last week with temps at -16!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  19. #2329
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 16, 2018

    The yard actually had some work for us to do yesterday. It's been a bit light for us lately as winter drags on. However, Tom, one of the shipwrights, asked us to take one of Mayflower II's crosstrees apart and strip off the paint. So that's what we did.



    I believe he said this if off the foremast and the mainmast crosstrees will be all new. The top (The guys in the ship yard call it the hot tub) sits on top of this.

    So we took it apart and started to strip.





    It actually felt good to get our hands back into the paint stripper, aka Goop.





    Time for lunch. Actually this time gave the goop time to work on the paint. There was only one coat so it came off quite easily.





  20. #2330
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We finished up with30 minutes to spare so Tom asked us to take the knees that came off Mayflower II's tops and put them into the shed. The knees while not perfect, are still solid enough to be re-purposed. There are no plans for now, but the grain structure of a knee is unique so that someday they may be very valuable to another project.

    These are all old yet pretty solid knees.

    Wayne has one of Mayflower II's knees in his hand. They are small compared to those in the pile he's standing on.





    During the day, Tango was unwrapped so I got to see inside.



    Not too luxurious.

    Forward



    Aft



    Anne was missing for a while and I finally found her in the paint shop cleaning Gramp"s prop.



    Gramp has been primed and is ready for a top coat. The bright work is also mostly done. However most of the paint crew prefers to not have their picture taken so there are no shots of Gramp's topsides today. They were all hard at work on her.

  21. #2331
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    First thing I noticed when I walked in this morning was a planer sitting in the yard. The shipyard has a new one. Well, not new, 1980's new.



    Here's the new one.



    It had just been taken off the skid.



    Outside, the old one was set up on the skid so it can be transported up to the Rossie Mill building and go into storage.





    The old Garvey was supposed to have a muffler installed by now, but minds have changed as to how and what will work best.



    There are three mufflers on the transom and one in place. Each one offers a solution and a problem. Roger awaits a decision on which one should go in. Apparently the original is shot and an exact replacement can't be found.




    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #2332
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 23, 2018

    As usual I start out with Nate to see what he's up to in the engine shop.

    He is making piston rings for the
    1909 Norfolk Naval Shipyard built engine.

    This picture is from April of 2016 when it was taken out of storage. It has been on a back burner since that time for when there are no other pressing matters. (Like now)




    Nate bought a piece of cast iron and bored it to size on the ID. The original rings are wider by .056" (1.47mm) on the side opposite of the ring gap. So in a four jaw chuck he offset the finished ID by the .056".





    Then he turned it to size to match the bore.



    Just before lunch he had it set up to part off all the rings he needed. There is enough here for a complete set. Using an air grinder clamped onto the tool post, this should be easy.



    To finish the rings he will hang them on a metal bar at the gap. Then using the torch he'll heat them red hot. With luck, they will fall off and expand enough to fit the bore properly. The expanded diameter will be compressed during installation to create pressure on the cylinder wall. Or that's the plan anyway.



  23. #2333
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wayne is on vacation for the next two weeks, so it's just Anne and me doing what we can.

    On the mast turning lathe, Tom is building a new mizzen mast for Mayflower II.



    He has to create an octagon out of the square and he is creating a space to start the circular saw.



    When he saws, he'll follow the line already laid out.



    Turning it to get to another corner.





    The saw only goes so deep, but at this point the finish is not important. He is prying off more wood.



    My guess is that he will not turn this using the lathe. Rather he will make it an octagon then a 16 sided figure. From there, smoothing it out is a relatively easy. Well, sort of. I don't see me doing it any time soon.

    But I have seen this method used a few times before and the work always came out beautiful.



  24. #2334
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    On the big band saw a Mayflower II futtock is taking shape.

    A variety of curves and angles makes this a complicated sawing.

    The back end of the piece is supported by an overhead crane.







    One side is done and onto the next.

    The wheel on the right adjusts the angle of the saw. As the wood progresses Greg calls out the angle changes and the wheel gets turned.



    This all matches templates made from the original.





  25. #2335
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    What was the Norfolk engine used for? Making piston rings from scratch, turning a mast, some very interesting projects going on in Mystic.

  26. #2336
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The saw needed to be reset for the next user.

    The wheel turns hard.



    There is a home made counter balance to help. I guess it's not enough.

    Look at the line going over to the counter weight.



    The weight. Not a very clear picture.



    Now the planing starts.



    Outside in the yard, Mayflower II is close to getting new planking.



    The strips guide the sizing of the planks. Not exactly a template, but does the same job.




  27. #2337
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    After lunch, I went into the Thompson building to look at the new Murmur: Arctic Realities and Pingo Exhibit

    This will explain it all.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/locati...tic-realities/

    Unless you wear the "Device" you only see nothing much at all. The "device" is a special head piece that is electronic and optical and mysterious. Take this thing back 400 years ago and you'd be burned at the stake for witchcraft.

    Hey, maybe it is witchcraft.



    Put it on and things pop out of the floor and bugs buzz. Birds chirp and no one else hears it.

    Steve gets fitted. You have to stand on special grounded mat because the electronics are very sensitive.



    I can't take any pictures of what I see, so look at the videos. I did take some pictures of the monitors in the room.



    Steve is listening to the recording. You can also read it.



    This is a pingo. The artist is standing on top of it. This is as much an art exhibit as it is a science exhibit.








  28. #2338
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1


  29. #2339
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 1, 2018

    Last week, Tom was making cuts on Mayflower II's mizzen that would make into an octagon. I assumed he was going to make it to 16 sides and then round it from there. This week it appears he turned it on the lathe.



    This is the cutter.



    It makes a lot of waste.

    Here is a good reason to where safety gear when working with power tools. The plastic sheet behind the lathe was full of these sharp little darts. One of those in the eye would not be a good thing.



    Our job was to clean it up for him. There was a significant volume!

    All of this had been behind the lathe.





    As we cleaned Tom continued to work.

    It's a simple device. He took a role of wide abrasive and cut it to about eight feet or so long. Then using glass backed tape he bonded both ends to each other. Using a electric drill he rotated the drum to drive the abrasive. The drum was lined with a rubber mat for traction.



    Worked slick.

  30. #2340
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    High tech gauging.



    The mast is tapered along its entire length and he has a gauge for each point along the length.



    Over in the paint shop Anne has started on the Conrad's life boat. She took out a couple of the floor boards and started to take off the paint.



    Susan is varnishing the two bases for Conrad's signal cannons.



    Across the way in the pole barn this boat is getting a major overhaul. It's a "Livery boat." You can rent it along with many others at the seaport. They rent these by the half hour or an hour for up to five people, depending on the boat of course.



    https://www.mysticseaport.org/explore/on-the-water/



  31. #2341
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Well folks, it's that time of the year and I'm out of here for two weeks.

    We have done a cruise during the winter for 14 years. We always have a good time. I'm not one to sit by the pool with a thousand other people, but you can be as alone as you want to be on a cruise ship. There is always something to do, or not do, to suit your fancy.

    Last year I saw one of the best airshows ever, right in front of our balcony.

    My wife and I were enjoying each other's company and a glass of wine when there was this unbelievably loud roar from the bow of the ship. Within a millisecond, an F- What ever (Who Knows) flew right
    by our balcony. He was so close, I could clearly see him inside. And we were looking down at him!

    I spoke to people who had been on the stern at the time and they said he did a wing wave as he flew out of sight.





    We have done this twice. It's a cooking class. Four people stand at a cooking station and prepare a meal of grouper and the fixens. (sp?)

    You start out with a
    toque (the hat) that they give you. Then they ask you what you want to drink. Having done this before, I was on to them. When ever you put your glass down they refill it. The first time we did this I don't remember the ride back to the ship. However I do remember having a great time.



    This was desert.



    On the way out of port I wondered if the captain had been on the same tour.



    This would have been me if I was driving.

    See you is a couple of weeks.



  32. #2342
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 9, 2018, Somewhere in the EasternCaribbean.


    On this cruise I have an internet connection so I can show you my vacation pictures. (Not!)

    Well, sort of. Here we are on the beach.





    We are back in Ft Lauderdale in a couple of days and then on to the Western Caribbean for another week.

    Scrape paint? Go to the beach? Life presents tough choices sometimes.


  33. #2343
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Thanks MVolunteer for your in depth visual and journalistic coverage of a true wood boat institution. I've been following this thread for some time and need to let you know how much I enjoy it!

    Time to turn off the laptop and enjoy!
    Please don't dominate the rap Jack, if you've got nothing new to say.

    Robert Hunter

  34. #2344
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 21, 2018

    Turn off the lap top and go have fun?

    Okay!

    Actually, there was so much to do and so little of me to do it, a few minutes on the lap top was very restful.

    When you cruise with 2,000 to 4,000 of your closest friends, you can do as much as you could ever want, or believe it or not, be completely alone.

    My wife and I have done this something like fourteen times now.

    We started out in Fort Lauderdale and were at sea for a whole day and night, getting to our first island stop in the Eastern Caribbean. Where was it? I'm wasn't sure while I was there and don't really care. It was warm and sunny. That's all that mattered. The next day, another island. More warm and sunny.

    After a week we returned to Fort Lauderdale where we got off and took a tour of the Fort Lauderdale canals and river. Back on board that night, and we sailed to the western Caribbean.

    Each port offers excursions that you can take at an extra cost. From as little as $49 per person to usually not more than $149 per person.

    We took a few.

    This is what they call a semi submarine. It's a fancy glass bottom boat. This was in Grand Cayman. (I think)

    All the mechanicals are fake, but they remind me of Captain Nemo's Nautilus.



    The guy driving the boat went over to feed the fish. He's in there somewhere.



    We passed over a wreck and this is the two engines.

    Nate needs this.

    According to the tour guide, a storm was coming and the captain did not heed the advice to anchor more off shore.



    It was a good sized boat.



    Not as big as our boat, however.





  35. #2345
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    1,928

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    When we go on these cruises, my wife sets it all up and tells me when it's time to pack my bag. She always asks me for my opinion on these things, but as long as it's warm and sunny, I'm a happy camper.

    This was Jamaica. We took a raft ride down this river, the Martha Brae.
    Two people and a man to steer per boat.



    The rafts are all bamboo and are held together with a single stranded wire. It looked galvanized. They last about six months, but they can be built for almost nothing.



    There is always someone trying to sell things where ever you go in the Caribbean. This was no exception.

    This guy, on the side of the river, was selling bamboo models of the raft we were on. He called out and my wife was hooked. But she couldn't find the pocket in her back pack where she had her cash. "No problem Mon." He jumped in the water and swam after us.

    It was an embarrassingly long time. When she finally gave him the money she asked how he would get back. "No problem Mon, I'll walk back on the road."



    You can just make out the raft in his hand.

    Our last stop Cozumel. We took a ferry over to the mainland and went to a place called Xcaret. To pronounce Xcaret I looked on line and found this.

    "The proper pronunciation of Xcaret sounds something like SHCA-ret, but ESH-cah-ret is most commonly heard."




    Xcaret is what I believe would be called and Eco-Park.

    If Mystic Seaport is a National Treasure, so is Xcaret for Mexico.



    These birds are not in cages. I'm not sure you should, but they are right there to touch. Life is good for them there so they just stay.



    I only get six picture per page on the forum so I'll stop here.

    See the video.

    Looking at this video, I see we missed a lot.

    Well, we can go back. This was our second time.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=U...&v=A-2w7_qTSVQ





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