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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #2241
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1





    The whaler on the opposite side of the river is docked where the S&P Oyster House is now.









  2. #2242
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    This is the only one I don't understand. The keel is supported on basically a monorail. I get the building of the ship, but how can it be launched without falling over?





    This makes a full circuit around the scale model. The sign says I am standing where the white horse is along side the ship about to be launched. The ship? The David Crockett.



    Back to the real world. I took a look at Mayflower II.

    The holes are drilled through the old planking to hold the new futtock in place until the ceiling is installed. Then the outer planking can be replaced.

    He will use lag screws to hold it up. You can see the screws already installed on the left.



    Inside, the keelson is almost in place. It's not yet fastened.



    In the barn, another keelson section is ready to go.





  3. #2243
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Work continues above.







    Next week we have a date on Thursday to do our thing. Anne will be back but Wayne's work in Texas will be long and hard. He said he'll be back mid month. We'll see.





  4. #2244
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Quote Originally Posted by Morgan Volunteer View Post
    This is the only one I don't understand. The keel is supported on basically a monorail. I get the building of the ship, but how can it be launched without falling over?





    This makes a full circuit around the scale model. The sign says I am standing where the white horse is along side the ship about to be launched. The ship? The David Crockett.





    Having finished the hull, caulked and painted her they build launching ways underneath her.
    If you look closely at the last Davy Crockett model you can see the launch cradle sitting on the launch ways going into the water.
    Smaller boats are bilged over so that the bilge sits on a launch way and the keel sits in a way with a hollow channel in its top.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #2245
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 13, 2017

    Yesterday I chipped paint on the Joseph Conrad. At 135 years old, the iron hull still needs chipping and painting as she did the day she was launched in 1882. Since Wayne is still away, I was working alone. It's fun though because visitors always stop and talk.

    This is the worst of it.



    Located under a stairway it was tough to get to.

    But by the time I was done, I had about four times as much done as shown here. Anywhere rust showed through the paint was my target. When done I sprayed on Ospho. It coverts the rust to a black and hard surface.

    West Marine says this about it.

    A metal treatment that, when applied to rusted surfaces, causes iron oxide (rust) to chemically change to iron phosphate—an inert, hard substance that appears black. Once dry, the treated surface can be overcoated with whatever paint system is desired. (Best results have been achieved with oil-base primers and topcoats. Test a trial sample before overcoating with epoxy or latex-based paint.) Application does not require the removal of light rust, however loose paint, rust scale, dirt, oil, grease and other accumulations should be removed first with a wire brush.



    After lunch I noticed Ryan working on one of the buildings in the village. It was just a routine repair.



    But what this did was, draw my attention to something new. I have walked past the building for eight years now and never looked inside.



    It's a model shop. There was no one there to talk to, but what I found made it obvious what was going on.



    They make the models for the Mystic River Scale Model Exhibit.

    http://stories.mysticseaport.org/mys...model-exhibit/




  6. #2246
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    This house is on the river opposite the seaport.





    The building is small with just about enough room for two or three people to work.



    Also on my way back to work, I spotted a visiting yacht.



    No big deal, right? We get lots of boats like this during the year.

    But this is my first helicopter on a boat.





  7. #2247
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 21, 2017

    I walked in and found Dean working on the older forklift rear/steering axle. I believe it dates back to the 1950's so it's had a lot of use.



    A bit later, Scott was burning off what remained of a roller bearing the had almost completely disintegrated. All the was left was no more that a thick film. The torch got it off.



    Anne and I worked on the Mayflower II most of the day, but when done we were asked to clean up the forklift as best we could.



    I'm not quite sure what this is, but the inner surface is rubber. It looks like it holds the upper pin in place in the top picture. It's very greasy.



    As always, Anne is really working hard.



    Wayne is still in Texas working with the Red Cross after the hurricane, but he's home late Sunday. I hope he'll be at the seaport on Tuesday. He told me he's going to take a two week break from the Red Cross and then go back in mid October. There are certainly plenty of disasters for him to attend to.


  8. #2248
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    As I mentioned above, Anne and I worked on Mayflower II. We did what we do, scrape paint. The keel has many, many layers of bottom paint so what ever was lose, we took off. For the most part the paint held tight, but a lot still came off. It doesn't have to be pretty, it just has to be ready for yet another coat of bottom paint.



    Looking forward.







    Just next to Anne's right hand is a segment of the worm shoe. The supports prevent the removal of the whole worm shoe, so segments were removed between the supports. Later, the keel will be lifted just enough to remove this smaller section. Then it will be replaced using a similar lifting method across several sections.

    So, what's a worm shoe? It's sacrificial piece of wood attached to the bottom of the keel to keep the worms away from the keel. Between the worm shoe and the keel is a layer of Irish felt soaked in pine tar. At least that's the way I remember it from the Morgan project. It prevents worm from boring into the keel.

    And it works too.

    Morgan's worm shoe looked worse than this.



    I don't know how the worm shoe was held in place, whether by lags or trunnels, but the hole left behind needs to be plugged. After drilling the hole larger, a trunnel was driven in and held with Gorilla Glue.







  9. #2249
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Crit is sawing off the trunnel. I think I have his name spelled correctly. Hope so anyway.



    Our gang did a lot of this sort of thing on Morgan. When a futtock is installed it has to be secured to the original planking to maintain the shape of the hull. When it's time to replace the planking, the lag screw hole in the futtock needs to be drilled out and plugged with wood. Usually we used white oak trunnels.

    On the port side, Chris is using a hole saw on an extension trying to remove an iron spike. He's cutting around the head so he could grab the head with vise grips.





    I didn't see it come out.

    Nathan is about to jack this timber into place using this jack. If there's a special name for this jack, I don't have it. He was in and out of the ship a few times planing part to make it fit.



    later, I poked my head up through the hull and he was still at it. The fit of these massive pieces is much tighter than you might think.



    Amidships, Tucker is vacuuming up. Note the keelson going into the stern.



  10. #2250
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The bow section of the keelson is in as well, and in the barn the last section is almost ready.



    In the barn, Jamie is make some final adjustments to the center section of the keelson.





    A lot of noise at the other end of the barn was coming form the planer.



    They are planing some of the covering boards for Mayflower II. It took me a while to find out what they meant by covering board.

    Covering Board - the outermost, wide, fore-and-aft running deck plank on either side of a vessel; covering much of the length of the top edge of the hull, the ends of the frames, and the top edge of the sheer clamp.


    I found it here.

    http://www.photographers1.com/Sailin...enclature.html

    We were all done cleaning the forklift with a few minutes to spare so I went exploring. In the attic of the paint shop is a treasure trove of good stuff. Some treasure, some junk. Mostly it depends on your needs.

    These lines wait for a need.



    In the eaves are leftover bronze spikes from the Morgan project.




  11. #2251
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A close up of one of the boxes of bronze spikes. I couldn't really get close to it.









    I think this is a sewing machine but.....



    A box of harpoon parts and whaleboat oarlocks.




    Americas attic is alive and well at Mystic Seaport.



  12. #2252
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Just before I left for home, I took a walk through the Shipyard Gallery located over the main floor of the DuPont Restoration shop.

    It has been closed for a few weeks while a new exhibit is installed for visitors.

    As of yesterday, not much appears to be ready.











    This exhibit opens today. I took this picture at 3:15 yesterday. I'm thinking they pulled an all-nighter to get it done.


    So, as I drove out to the street to go home, Stonington High School was just getting started. They are one of the few public high schools in the country to have a rowing team.



    http://stoningtoncrew.org/about



  13. #2253
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Quote Originally Posted by Morgan Volunteer View Post





    I think this is a sewing machine but.....




    The top one is for leather work.

    The bottom one is a heavy duty industrial unit. The chain and lever affair goes to a foot treadle so that you can lift the machines foot wilst keeping both hands on the work piece..
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #2254
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    First let me say thank you for this absoulty awsome thread, I am reading every page, currently on page 39. I just wanted to post an observation. I noticed that a lot of the lead you were cleaning and painting is stamped DOE RUN. The doe Run lead smelter is / was about 30 miles South of me in Herculanium Missouri. It was started in the mid 1800's as St. Joseph lead.
    I just thought it interesting that a good bit of the ballest in the Morgan came from Missouri, It takes a village.
    Simmons Sea Skiff build photos here:
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/vxuQDZI0Dz7qjzAx1

  15. #2255
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Incredible documentation, I too am lapping this up! Thanks!

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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 26, 2017

    Thank you for your comments and "Atta-Boys." I enjoy doing this but a pat on the back goes a long way.

    I looked up Doe Run Lead and found this.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doe_Run_Company

    There was a lot more but this covers it pretty well.

    Yesterday I pounded paint on the Conrad. I didn't take any pictures, but look at two weeks ago and yesterday looks pretty much the same.

    So I chipped until lunch when I met Nate and Barbara for lunch. We had guests for lunch. Jake has not been able to work with us for a while, but we have always kept in touch. Jake, his wife Ann, and their friend Sheree ate with us.

    Sheree is visiting from New Zealand. She came here as an exchange student when she met Ann. This was sometime in the 70's, I believe. She, Ann, and Jake have been life long friends.

    Jake (Center) appears in many posts here during and after the Morgan project. His wife is trying to get him to come back. Most of his big projects at home are done so we all hope he'll be back soon.

    I took this picture yesterday to send to Wayne. We all miss him and he's in Florida now aiding hurricane victims.



    So, after a hard morning of pounding paint I took the afternoon off so we could give Sheree the two hour tour. Sheree told me she reads this thread, so, a note to Sheree.

    Sheree, I've been at the seaport for eight years and haven't seen it all. Come back and spend more time. Two hours doesn't cut it.

    If two hours is all you have, the Morgan is a must see.

    We started on deck and found Hank on duty. He is one of the people you really want to find when you want to hear about the Morgan. Or any other place he's interpreting at Mystic Seaport.

    Look for the red suspenders.

    Here he is telling Sheree about the whaling industry and how it helped the American economy. To hear him tell it you might think that without whale oil the industrial age would not have happened. He may be right.



    Note the harpoon between them. Hank is explaining about Lewis Temple and his improved harpoon that revolutionized the whaling industry.

    http://educators.mysticseaport.org/a...e_toggle_iron/

    Anne was working on the Morgan. She says hi.





    After four years the Morgan is getting a bit of a touch up.



    I don't think Anne has ever goofed off in her life.



  17. #2257
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    From the Morgan we went up to the machine shop where Nate was going to show Jake, Ann, and Sheree the Wolverine engine.

    The seaport is still a place to have a nice lunch with a view.



    So, Nate demonstrated the Wolverine.



    Lastly, we went up to the new display in the loft of the DuPont Restoration Building.









    It's amazing the amount of detail these displays contain.


  18. #2258
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A few of those details.



















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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    I never knew it was a tree.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crataegus_laevigata

    You never can know what might turn up in a museum.







    As best I can read the note, it says, Mayflower crosses the Atlantic, spring 1957.



    It's hard to know what may be of value some day.



  20. #2260
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 28, 2017

    Nice things happen when you volunteer or do favors.

    Sometime back I got a call from this guy who needed a small part made. Generally what we do in my shop is drill very deep holes in metal for customers. We take the customers part, drill the hole, and send it back. Very specialized. It's called gundrilling or deep hole drilling. Same thing, different name. It's how you drill a hole through a gun barrel. We don't drill gun barrels, but what ever needs a deep hole, we can do. Most of the parts that I drill, that I know
    about, are for tools used in orthopedic surgery. However mostly I have no idea what the part will be. It's a part and I drill a hole.

    So, this guy came by and asked George, the foreman, to make a part for his car. We're not set up to do other things, but sometimes we can help.

    Today he brought the car around to show us.

    It's a 1964 Dodge.

    Being a retired Greenwich cop, he built it into a 1964 police cruiser.

    Of course, this has absolutely nothing to do with Mystic Seaport or wooden boats, but most people can admire a job well done.



    The tires are radials, made to look like bias ply tires.

    The battery looks like an old style lead acid battery, but it's a fake cover on top of a Die Hard. The kit even comes with a decal to make it look authentic.



    Naturally he has pictures.



    It looks like he's prepared. The spare is an original bias ply tire.





    Oh, one other part we drilled was for the US Olympic Bobsled Team. We drilled the axles for the runners. Just like NASCAR, the suspension needs to be light. Naturally we did it for free.

    Volunteering can be fun, and it pays you back in ways you'll never expect.

  21. #2261
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 4, 2017.

    Happy Broderick Crawford day.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broderick_Crawford

    If you're old enough, you know what this is about. If not, well,
    Broderick Crawford was a detective on a 1955 TV show called Highway Patrol. And it is he that we can thank for making the term 10-4 common in the American/English language.

    Got that? 10-4 good buddy.

    So enough silliness.

    Anne was going to the Morgan to work and this is the last time I saw her all day.



    The work boat behind her will most likely be a fall/winter project. But for now we work out side.

    I was back on the Joseph Conrad. Instead of chipping, we were painting.

    My painting partner is not comfortable with having her picture used so I asked if this one would be OK. It is.

    Wayne is still in Florida helping hurricane victims.



    On the way back to Conrad after lunch I walked in back of the life saving station.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/locati...aving-station/

    There, I found a small building getting a new roof.

    When men patrolled the beaches watching for ships in distress, this small building was where the man would would end his tour before heading back. Read about it here.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/locations/halfway-house/



    Right next door, there were a few of the volunteers from the boathouse.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/explore/on-the-water/

    They maintain the fleet of boats available for rent during the season.

    Here they are working on one of several boats in the fleet.





    Further on, is a marine railway. I have never seen it used and I'm not sure it ever is anymore. It is powered by a building behind me called Fire Fly. But a search of the Mystic Seaport website comes up with nothing on it. So some day I'll ask.

    I don't have a picture but perhaps this will work.

    https://www.google.com/maps/@41.3613...7i13312!8i6656




  22. #2262
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The rest of the Conrad painting was over very soon, so I took a walk to Mayflower II.



    I was not aware of this until yesterday. Some, if not all, of the futtocks have tar between them.



    It's hard to see here, but he is planing the butt end of a futtock so the next one will fit better.



    Chris is sawing off the long end of a bolt. Morgan used trunnels to hold the futtocks together.





    This is in the bow on top.




  23. #2263
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    This piece is coming out for a better fit.








    I'm not sure, but it looks like he's cutting the board away from the frame. It is too hard to get to him and ask.



    Down in the shop, a covering board is taking shape.





    The workmanship if phenomenal.


  24. #2264
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Jamie is making another futtock.



    I walked over to take a look at the aluminum, Garvey. It has been going slow, but now has a helm.



    As I was about to go home, I found Scott unloading a new engine for the collection. It was just donated.



    It's a single cylinder Lathrop, built just down the street in Mystic. I believe I heard, 1919.



    Salt has made a mess of it, but Scott and crew will make it new again. It may not happen soon, but it will eventually. With Mayflower II, everyone is very busy.



    When I say it was built just down the street, it really was. The restaurant that uses the building now is called the Engine Room. Walk out the back gate of the seaport and turn right at the end of the block.

    This address seems to work. I wonder if it will always work. Anyway, here is the J. W. Lathrop Engine company home. (AKA, The engine Room.) It's the red brick building in the back.

    https://www.bing.com/maps?osid=475cd...=2&form=S00027









  25. #2265
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    It is always great following your updates Carl! The last time I remember the Firefly railway used was the very early 1970's, (about the same time the Dupont shipyard was built). I think I might remember Ema C. Berry on the railway.

  26. #2266
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 10, 2017

    During the morning break time I like to wander around and just look at what projects are going on.

    The Mayflower II's round top is getting a rebuild.



    Some of the knees are replace and there's more to go.



    I love to look at the benches. Lots of good stuff.



    I believe this is the bottom end of a part of the stern. Before and after. I think the rudder attaches to this.



    With no one around I didn't find where this is going, but last week a covering board was here and it had the same cutouts for the framing. So, I'm pretty sure it to is a covering board.



    I'm not sure if this needs work other than painting. It's been sitting here for quite a while.



  27. #2267
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I was going to paint the Conrad again today. So naturally I will need paint.

    This is neat. No trouble straining the paint, just pour and wait.



    I am working pretty much alone and pictures of me painting are, well.....

    So here's the Conrad on the out side.



    If you send your kid to sail camp, this is where they spend their nights. They now sleep in bunks with real mattresses. When she was built as a school ship, they used hammocks.

    She is a training ship and somewhat small by comparison to other ships of the day. She was built to train young boys and men about sailing a ship so the places where lines attach are labeled. For an old salt, no labels are needed, but for a 14 year old, they help.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/locations/conrad/



    Still used for education and one small school group after another came on board.



    The brown cabin above was the galley back in the day. Now it's used as quarters for an adult during the sail camps.



    I made my way over to the Morgan and found a whale boat demonstration.



    These demonstrations go on all day long. When you come through the visitors centers you will get a guide telling you when and where different demonstrations will be held.

  28. #2268
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    On board Morgan I found Anne painting the "winter doors." This half door goes on the entrance to the fo'c'sle. The "Summer doors" are louvered for air circulation.



    The rest of the paint crew were working on the boat deck further aft.







    Back in the shipyard I asked what he was up to. He was peeling off the bark where this piece of ash was sitting in the dirt.



    Louie was making a part for the stem.



    Don't forget, you can watch Mayflower II live. But do it before 3:30 before they go home.

    http://plimoth.org/mayflowerLive


  29. #2269
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 17, 2017

    Wayne is back. Between Texas and Florida he was gone 43 days. As Mental health volunteer, he was in charge of a Red Cross group of volunteers who worked with hurricane victims. He even helped a helicopter pilot who had rescued dozens of people off roof tops. The suffering of those he rescued finally got to him and he needed to talk.

    After 43 days, he has to give it a break. Others will help in California and Las Vegas.

    He got in late Monday night so we only met for lunch.

    My job for the day was to paint this trailer.



    It will, and can, only be used for storage. Paint makes most things look new, but the holes rusted into the frame says, be careful. In a perfect world there would be tons of money and a brand new trailer could be purchased. Well, as you know, the world isn't perfect.

    So this trailer will support Gramps in storage.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/news/2...he-collection/



    It will look very nice if you don't poke around. And Gramps doesn't weigh very much.



    The whole time I was painting a forklift truck back up alarm was beeping. After a while I had to find out what they were doing. The beeping never stopped and it was getting annoying.

    Well, it was the annual driving test for all the people who need to use the trucks. The lady with the clipboard was giving the test.





    In the machine shop Jim was building a clamp that will be used on Mayflower II. It will aid in removing old steel bolts from the hull. I have a picture of it in use later on.





  30. #2270
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Also in the machine shop, Dean was making rings that will attach to Mayflower II's cannons.





    The original.



    Also in the shop, Scott was oiling up a seized Palmer engine. This one should be easy. It's all there and the water jacket is not rusted through.





    Lastly on this page, Nate has a new tachometer for the Wolverine.



    It's the same tach he tried before, except this time he mounted the pickup on the inside of the flywheel. The last time, the magnet was on the outside and even though it's one of those really strong neodymium magnets
    , it fell off.

  31. #2271
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Almost time to go home, I took a tour of Mayflower II.

    Chris is removing a bolt that appears to have been through the keel, keelson, and a knee. They were using a clamp like the one Jim was making earlier. It might have been the same clamp. A bottle jack on one side and Porta Power on the other.



    While setting up more risers you can see the bolt they are removing.

    There's another one just aft of this one.



    This new timber is getting a coating of shellac. (I think)



    I'm not sure if this is truly a futtock or perhaps a timber. But the upper futtock will also be replaced. So right now the new piece with the clamp on it looks too short for where it's going.



    Up on deck, the frame work for the bow appears to be almost done. Again, a coat of shellac (I think) is going on.



    In the stern, this piece needs a Dutchman. After the part was roughed out, there was some bad wood that needed a patch. Overall, it's too big and too good to start over.



    So now it's time to go home.

  32. #2272
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 24, 2017

    The engine collection has a new (old) toy. It's a pile driver for putting in dock pilings.



    Nate took the head off and all looks well inside. He pulled and lapped the valves and found it had good compression when he cranked it over. Dean hopes to be able to demonstrate it at nest years engine show.



    The ignition is dead and will be replaced or rebuilt.

    70 Years in the auto/electric business, Jim will probably be the one to take care of that part.



    He'll be 90 in March.

    The blur of Nate's hand is the cranking of the engine to see how the compression feels.

    It's good.



    This is the weight to drive the pilings.



    In the room next door is the steam shop. Anne is taking the paint off a part of Sabino's cooling system.





  33. #2273
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The Sabino developed a slow leak late in the summer. It was located behind a flange in the steam/water recovery system.



    The flange was located at the end of this plank so the plank is being replaced.



    Right now he is shaping the forward plank to create a scarf joint with the new replacement.



    Moving into the paint shop.

    This coming weekend is the annual half hull carving class.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/event/...-construction/

    Rather than have the student start from scratch, to save time and send everyone home with a semi-finished half hull, the hulls are assembled ahead of time. This might be too short of a notice, but watch for it next year.

    Here are the hulls getting glued up. The blanks have been sawn into shape and fitted into this jig for gluing.



    This looks like it will be a half hull of Brilliant.



    I took this course a few years ago. Here's mine.



    If you want to see this process, go back in this thread to to April 1, 2012.



  34. #2274
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    In the paint shop is one of the two round tops from Mayflower II. The other one is still in the DuPont barn undergoing a rebuild.

    The Pilots painted the primer and someone of the paid staff will make it pretty.



    Here is an article about pilots.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/join/communities/pilots/

    It sounds like a lot of fun. Of course we do the same thing, but don't get a meal.

    Also in the paint shop are winter buoys for the moorings out in the river. The ice doesn't seem to pull on them much.



    "Hey Wayne, it's time to get something done."



    We headed off to the small boat shed to clean up the cat boats, Again.

    Not exactly an airtight building, the dust blows in and takes up residence. So dusting is done several times ever year.



    As you may remember, we've been here before.

    However, as it turns out, Wayne had never been in this building before.



    After lunch we took a tour of the art gallery.



    I sprang for a piece of scrimshaw done by our own, Quentin, shipyard director.

    I'll take a picture of it and post it next week.

  35. #2275
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    October 31, 2017

    We met Nate in the machine shop where he was trying to make springs for the Wolverine engine. The fuel injectors are held shut by springs until just the right time when they open to inject fuel. The springs that came with the engine are each different. This makes it difficult to adjust the engine.

    Spring making is simple. Just bend a wire into a spring shape. It gets complicated when you need one just the right size and strength. So this will be by trial and effort.

    Nate started off by using a 1/2" piece of steel and drilling a hole in the side.



    He also made a tool to hold the wire and keep it under tension while the lathe turns.

    Using the gear settings on the lathe he was able to get the desired number of turns per inch. Again, this is all trial and error for now. He's not even sure how strong a spring is needed.





    Wayne and I left him to ponder his job as we started ours.

    This is a crane that mounts on the forks of the lift truck. The old one needed repairs, now we get to paint it.



    All done.



    Nate is reading a book about spring making.





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