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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #1786
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 5, 2016

    Happy New Year.

    Since it was 15 degrees (-9C) outside, John decided not to work on the Atlas engine. That big boy will have to wait.

    Meanwhile he had little to do so he painted the Palmer engine that Nate has been working on. Nate has been away for a couple of weeks. There is so little room available in the engine shop due to the Sabino rebuild, no new projects are on tap right now.

    This is in primer right now. Later, I heard he painted it red.



    The bore is shot so Nate bought a sleeve to reline it. Before he left he was making a boring bar to turn the bore in the lathe. The new sleeve sitting on top.



    I think it cost in the $20.00 range. Counting labor, it's the cheapest part of the rebuild. (Of course in this case the labor is free)

    This is the fixture he will mount in the four jaw chuck on the lathe. Once trued up it should be easy to bore it to size. The bore will be cut leaving a step on the bottom so the sleeve won't fall through. Then the top will be trimmed and the cylinder head and gasket will hold it in place. I don't know about now, but a lot of aluminum engines used this system years ago so the piston rode on an iron surface.



    Walking down to the paint shop I noticed Mayflower II has a cover.

    That is a huge improvement for winter conditions.



    It was too cold to explore so my next stop was the paint shop.

    Our task for the day was to scrape off the loose paint on the two ramps used on the Conrad. Conrad is still out of the water and can almost be seen above next to Mayflower II.




  2. #1787
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    Barbara is a bit short so she makes do.



    It had warmed up just enough for Dollar Dogs.







    Then back to work.



    This is the other ramp.



  3. #1788
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    After lunch Wane and I went up to the mill building to talk with Carol, the woman who does the framing of pictures. If you didn't know about this place you would never find it. Her shop is tucked into the middle of the building somewhere between the shipping department and the engine collection. This building is huge.

    Both of us want to get a picture framed. I was picking up one and dropping off another to be done.



    It's a print of the whale ship Sunbeam. There was a vender selling the blue prints at the Wooden Boat Show so I had one framed and was now getting the deck plan framed as well.

    I found this on line. The original Sunbeam.



    http://www.sunbeamship.com/

    Wayne, being at the right place and time, found a set of prints in the trash just as the shipyard was getting rid of them. They were of the Morgan and had been used in the rebuild. They are all marked up with notes and details. For us, they are a treasure.

    Now he is having at least one framed.








    http://www.fullcircleframing.com/



  4. #1789
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 12, 2016

    I started out in the engine shop where Nate was preparing to bore out the Palmer engine for a new sleeve in the bore.





    I left and went to work scraping paint while Nate pressed on. He sent me his pictures this morning.

    There was a lot missing due to the rust but he took out around .100" so breaking through was no big surprise.



    Then he installed the sleeve. A very light press was used so it didn't damage the block.





    Now it was time to bore it out to fit the piston.



    You might ask why he is going to all this trouble to restore what looks like a very minor piece of maritime history. The answer is that it's the only one we have. There must be others out there, but this one is ours, and all our children are special aren't they?





  5. #1790
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    There are a variety of jobs for us this day.

    Susan was cleaning the bottom of the Conrad.



    Karl was
    working on the other side.







    From here I walked down past where Jim and Roger working on Blue Boat. I'm not sure that is the name that will be used forever, but that's it for now.

    Blue Boat was a donation. No one is sure who the builder is, but it has two diesels so it will be great for towing and tugging. On that note, Jim is installing the base for a Sampson post. It's made of welded aluminum.



    Roger was working on the instrument cluster but leaned out to say hello.






  6. #1791
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    As always, were scrape. All of these pieces are for LA Dunton.

    This is the bowsprit.



    I'm not sure but I think Anne is working on a top mast.



    Barbara and I worked in the mid section of the bowsprit. We only got about half done on the top. When the top is done we'll have to roll it over for the bottom side.

    That is the LA Dunton in the background on the left.



    We started out in the shade so it was cold, but doable. Later after lunch the clouds covered the sun and the wind started to blow and we got really cold. That was it for me that day and I went home.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/locations/l-a-dunton/


  7. #1792
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 15, 2016

    I just found this on the seaports website. It makes for some interesting reading.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/maritim...whaling-fleet/

    http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/shipwrec...whaling-fleet/

    Now here is an interesting project you can personally get involved with. NOAA is trying to transcribe old logs to determine the weather that was recorded in the logs during there voyages. Listen to the NPR article about this project.

    Click on "Listen to Story.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/09/03/341697...-about-climate

    http://www.whalingmuseum.org/explore...aa-old-weather

    http://whaling.oldweather.org/#/



  8. #1793
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    January 19, 2016

    Yesterday was a very busy day where I did nothing, at least not for the seaport. John was not going in with me so I contacted Wayne to see if he would like a ride. I can squeeze three in my truck, but it's tight. Wayne sometimes will walk to the seaport so a ride was only important because it was way too cold. He texted back that his wife took his truck because her battery was dead and asked if I would get a battery with him.

    "Sure." I said.

    So we started off to the battery store. But first we stopped at a small market/deli/coffee shop for a coffee and a donut. Great little place. Looks like it's in some small back woods town way up in the mountains. Wooden floors, a couple of small tables for a snacks and coffee, need some spaghetti sauce? The only thing missing was a mongrel dog out on the front porch.

    Next stop, Battery store.

    From there we drove back to Wayne's to put the battery in. Actually, we did not put the battery in. Wayne lives in one of those great neighborhoods where your neighbors really do care. His neighbor told us to leave the keys and he would pull into his garage and install it. So we left the battery at the neighbor's and drove over to the seaport.

    On the way over Wayne told me about a call he received from a friend of his daughter's a couple of nights before. He is a captain making a boat delivery from Plymouth, Massachusetts to Florida. He, the captain, was in the Mystic River and asked if Wayne could make arrangements for a slip for the night at the seaport.

    Wayne called security about it and was told, "No, the seaport is closed."

    Wayne explained that they were in the river, it was getting dark and beginning to snow, and the boat is a Chesapeake Bay Bug Eye, not just a lost boater looking for a slip. Security put him on hold and came back to say that "management" said ok.

    Wayne went over to the seaport just in time to see them tossing lines. The "Dock boy" was Mystic Seaport Shipyard Directer, Quentin Snediker. Turns out the boat is well know to a lot of the seaport staff.

    So we were driving over to the seaport and Wayne texted the captain to see if they were aboard. They were and we got the tour.

    Not the best view.





    We went below to a smokey cabin heated with a wood burning stove. Every couple of minutes, the very strong wind would blow down the chimney and fill the cabin with smoke. They were hoping to get to a hardware store to buy an elbow to aim away from the wind.

    The smoke, the captain, and Wayne.





    One of the crew had a book about the Chesapeake Bay boats. He opened to this page showing a similar boat under sail.



    There were many variations of the Bugeye shown in the book. Some were gaff rigged. Here is what Wikipedia has to say about it.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugeye

  9. #1794
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1







    Finally we made our way over to the paint shop and found Anne and Barbara hard at work.





    However now it was 11:00 and I had to go get the grill set up for Dollar Dogs. This was my last day. Dean was coming back from an extended time off. He is the one who started Dollar Dogs in the first place. Naturally nothing goes as planned. There was no propane and I had to go find a bottle. That problem solved I had to get it started. It would not stay started. The wind kept blowing out the flame. Finally after it warmed a bit it would stay lit.

    It was a light crowd because of the cold and wind. But like the Post Office, through rain and sleet, blah, blah, blah, I had plenty of dogs for those that braved the weather. It was so windy the even the grill blew over. I managed to grab it just in time. We moved the grill into the engine shop. So my duty is done. I turned the money and extra dogs over to Dean.

    After lunch the crew from Lucky Finn (Wayne's friend's boat) showed up. We took them on a tour.






  10. #1795
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A quick look at Necessity and then we went over to the DuPont barn.



    The first work I could see being done on Sabino was the guy touching up the carving on the bow.





    Ed is preparing a boring bar to bore out the new shaft log.



    Up in the rigging loft, Matt was showing a technique he uses in rigging. The crew from the Mayflower II was getting some help with their rigging.





    As soon as he was done, he took a knife and cut it apart again. It was just a demonstration.




  11. #1796
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    As we left the rigging loft they guys examined the work being done on Mayflower II. These are called clamps. They attach to the frames and will support the deck above.



    From here the guys were walking to the hardware store and I was going home.

    Tough day? I didn't do a thing other than cook hot dogs.

    So for the next two weeks I will be away. We have been going on cruises since 2004 and always have a good time. If you like a party, a cruise is a good place to go. If you'd rather not be in a crowd, a cruise is a good place to go. It always amazes me how there can be so many people on board and so many places are quiet. Case in point, I always take a book along. Often I will go to one of the night clubs and there will be no one there at 3:00 in the afternoon. On the other hand, the pool area is "Rockin'." However most ships have two pools. The other one will be quiet.

    So, I'll say hi to the locals for you.





    Time for dinner. This was one of the formal nights.



    The next day on the beach.





  12. #1797
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 10, 2016

    Two weeks ago we were able to reschedule our flight to Fort Lauderdale to a day earlier due to the east coast blizzard expected on Saturday. The flight was overbooked and they offered up to $1,300 per passenger to reschedule to Detroit, stay in a hotel there, and then a flight to Fort Lauderdale the next day. They needed eight people and only two took them up on it. I was not about to mess up a cruise with that offer so we declined. Eventually everyone made it on board through some sort of magic.

    My wife and I went on a two week cruise to a bunch of different islands including Key West where we went to Mel Fishers shipwreck museum. That's worth a trip to Florida.

    http://melfisher.com/default.html

    Ever wonder what a real treasure chest looks like? Well here it is. It was filled to the top with pieces of eight.



    Each of the twenty four bars behind weighs 85 pounds.



    Our last day was on the cruise ships private beach.

    Blizzard?



    We found a ship wreck. Sort of.

    Captain Morgan's On The Rocks.





    Cute place.





    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 02-12-2016 at 06:16 AM.

  13. #1798
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Back to reality.



    Anne and Joe have been busy cleaning the winch form the Dunton.



    Wayne and I were going to start on the wheel house off the Sabino. It was too cold in the pole barn to use any "Goop". (our name for the stripper.) All we were able to do was remove some hardware.



    I can't imagine why any one would design a product where the screw is hidden behind a part. It happens all the time. Perhaps there's a trick to it. Wayne got it off, but...





    I took the doors off.





  14. #1799
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Huston, we have a problem.

    I hate when things like this happen.

    I think it's a case of two pounds of stuff in a one pound box.

    The Palmer engine Nate has been working on has been on a cart and unknown to anyone, it was just delicately balanced. One of the guys just touched it and it ended up on the floor.



    It broke a cover plate and the carburetor. No parts were available so Scott is welding it back together.



    I think the carburetor flange will be an easy fix with a couple of dowels and some sort of cement. Or perhaps a couple of small screws.



    Considering how it looked when Nate started working on it, this was a minor setback.

    The guys were working on a Lehman diesel engine. Supposedly a good engine but it would not turn over. The head came off and all that looked very good. They finally found that the starter motor was probably not original. It fit, but not quite.



    As the engine turned, it would stop hard in one place. The starter motor bearing carrier bound up on the flywheel in one spot.



    Jack polished off the high spot and now it works.



    John talked to Scott about taking it down further to check the cam and bearings. This engine will be used in a new aluminum boat being built to replace the Garvey. Since it is not just for display, it needs to work reliably.

    So far it looks very good. The bores are not scored and there is no ridge where the pistons ring stop at the top of the stroke.

    Now if no one drops it....

  15. #1800
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    There is a grocery store not too far from the seaport called McQuades Marketplace. During the winter we when the galley is closed we will often go there for lunch. As we were walking out, Rob, (Lead shipwright on the Morgan project) had just returned. He said there was a ham and turkey there that looked like it came off a table in Henry VIII's table.

    He was right on.



    They have a nice cafeteria with a fireplace. Sadly, the fireplace was out of order.



    When we got back, the crew was trying to push the Conrad back onto the ship lift. The green forklift broke a kingpin so while it's in the shop, the seaport rented this one. Scott was trying to push it but there wasn't enough traction. The rock salt didn't help.



    So they hooked up a block and tackle.

    I have never seen this done before. Rather than tying the line directly to the fork lift and chance damaging it, Dean made a Kellem's grip from another line that is attached to the truck.



    It worked beautifully.







  16. #1801
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The goal is to get the Conrad onto the ship lift and lower it at high tide the next day.





    The Amistad is getting new caulking.





    Here are her mufflers and stainless exhaust pipes.





    Wayne and I went onto Mayflower II for a look around. I'll cover that on the Mayflower II thread tomorrow.

  17. #1802
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Great updates , thank you !!!

  18. #1803
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 16, 2016

    Last week it was too cold to do anything productive. This week it was considerably warmer and we were playing catch up all day.

    When John and I arrived we went to the machine shop so he could get going on his project.

    The winch off of LA Dunton needs a new gear. Dean made a wooden pattern so he could have it cast but the foundry said the shape was much too complicated to be economical. So Dean welded one together.

    Here he is cutting a key way. Last time I did this was in high school.





    It will engage the large gear below.



    Wayne spent a part of his day cleaning off the (for lack of a better word) bearing retainers. The metal bearings are held in place by these two parts. The shaft runs on two much smaller surfaces (above) to the left.



    You can see the bearing cavity on the left side of the block he's working on.

    Anne is working on Sabino's wheel house doors.



    I will be bringing home the hardware to put in a tumbler to clean them up. I did this on a lot of Morgan hardware too.


  19. #1804
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I was asked to take this hardware from Amistad and clean it up. First step was to use a needle gun to get off the heavy rust. Finding most of the good metal still there I went on to the sand blast cabinet to finish it up.



    If the rust was too bad and the integrity of the part had been compromised, a new one would be made. But this looked quite good.



    This was not done yet but I found out the plan is to have them galvanized. It will need to be much better than this.



    So with permission, I brought them home and took them to a local shop where they will be much better. It's a lot earier on me and it's an inexpensive donation that I can make.

    I also got an estimate of what the rest of the hardware would cost. I took this so the shop could see the rest of the job.



    I thought there were only six of these straps. I spoke with Quentin this morning and found the are many more. I'll bring them home next week and get a firm quote. We have time. Amistad is not going anywhere soon.

    She's well covered for the winter.



    I love this camera. It was only $400 and I beat it practically to death by dragging it into all sorts of dirty environments And yet I took this from the other side of the yard. I didn't know what he was doing until I opened the picture today. He is reefing out the old caulk.








  20. #1805
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wayne and I moved onto our next project, the Sabino's wheelhouse.

    Last week it was way to cold to work out in the pole barn. It wasn't too cold for us, rather for the "goop" we use to strip paint.

    Yesterday, however, was beautiful balmy 55 degrees. (13C)

    We needed to run a small test to see how much paint we were dealing with. Too much and we'll take it all off. Only a coat or two, we'll sand and repaint.

    Well it was more than a couple.

    The hardest part about stripping bead board is getting into the depth of the bead. On the Morgan, we put coat after coat of goop on and never really got all the way down. We want to get it as clean as we can to show up the detail.



    The Morgan had a lot of lead paint on her and we could only use the "Goop." Here, there is no lead paint so we were able to use heat.



    This unit was bought for the Morgan but wasn't used due to the lead.

    A short comment about lead.

    During the Morgan project some of us took the lead abatement seminar. The most dramatic story told was of a four or five year old girl whose IQ was estimated to be well above 120. She got into the lead paint dust and ended up with an IQ of 80! - And that's for life! It has to do with the development of nerves and young children are very vulnerable.

    So, please don't take chances with lead or lead paint.

    Nuff said?

    Back to scrapin' paint. The real advantage with this fancy heater is the heat softens the paint in the bead. We got the seams cleaner than we ever were able to on the Morgan.

    So---Back to the engine shop.

    Two weeks ago, the Palmer engine Nate had been working on ended up crashing onto the floor. Scott took me aside to show be another victim of the fall. He had just finished welding this plate.



    If there was one "Good?" element of the engine falling, it was that they discovered the original color. It was not red, it was green.

    Scott had a can of the green left over from another Palmer rebuild. Bob is wire brushing the old paint to clean up the lettering.



    John and Nate were working on the Lehman engine.

    They decided to take it all the way down. Check the bearings, put in new seals, replace the freeze out plugs. Chances are it is in perfect condition but now is a good time to find out.

    To get the pan off they are mounting it on an engine stand. The problem they were having at this point is the shape of the oil pan.

    The pan also includes the flange where the bell housing bolts on and there is not much to strap to the engine stand. It splits right about where John's finger is pointing.



    When John and I left, Nate was fabricating a couple of right angle brackets to bolt to the rear motor mount holes. (Also where John's finger is pointing)




  21. #1806
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Such a great thread, and isn't the Conrad looking trim after all the work.

  22. #1807
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 23, 2016

    Wayne and I spent a good part of the day working on Sabino's wheel house. Because there is no lead in the paint the seaport says it's OK to burn it off. We are using a device called Silent Paint Remover. It has two glass filled heating elements to heat up the paint.

    We had to use a chemical strip on other projects due to the lead content of the paint. The section we are doing here took the best part of the day to do. Well, not exactly. We don't really have to answer to any one so our time is our own. But if we were using the chemical strip we would be on this job for several days. Put on the goop, let it stand for a few hours, scrape it off, reapply the goop, wait a couple of hours..... Or days...

    So we were down to the last board for the day and the on/off rocker switch gave it up. I brought it home with me to replace the switch.



    With nothing more pressing to do, we took a walk. I wanted to find Doug who is in charge of the paint department, to ask permission to take the tool home so I can fix it. We were told he was on the Morgan, so...



    She looks good. Real good.

    The try works are covered for the winter.



    As is the skylight.



    But the ship was locked up. No Doug.

    So we walked on the wharf.



    The place gets a bit lonely during the off season.



    Wayne spotted something on the dock.

  23. #1808
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The seagulls find a clam, take it high, and bombs away. The shell breaks and the gull eats.



    We knew Anne was working on the Conrad so we stopped by. I am posting this older picture so anyone who is unfamiliar with her can take a look.



    http://www.mysticseaport.org/locations/conrad/

    She too is wrapped up for the winter.





    We found Anne painting in the aft cabin.







  24. #1809
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    Conrad is used as a dormitory during the summer sailing camps. Walking forward for a look at the living quarters for the kids.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/learn/summer-camps/conrad/





    The construction is interesting.



    We walked back to the shipyard with her.



    A cold winter day.



  25. #1810
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 1, 2016

    I was speaking with Dana Hewson,
    Vice President for Watercraft Preservation & Programs, (The Big Boss in the ship yard) about work on the Amistad. I had had some parts sandblasted at a local company where I live and we talked about any volunteer time I might put in. He commented that he can not charge for volunteer hours on boats that are not owned by the seaport.

    Bottom line, so to speak, the seaport isn't going to have us work on Amistad or Mayflower II. Sounds very reasonable to me. Why give away what you can charge for.

    So with that in mind, I decided I will no longer add to the Mayflower II thread and whenever I can, I will show her progress here.

    So what's going on with Mayflower II.

    These are cross beams (I don't know a nautical name for them) to support a deck in the stern. While they were sawn and planed with modern tools, the finish will show marks of a 17th century adz.











    The above pictures are from last week. Here they are installed.






  26. #1811
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    When I went aboard they were hauling out a beam that will soon be replaced.



    Using a block and tackle they lifted it up and over the rail.







    Meanwhile, over the starboard rail, a new floating dock is heading north to a new home. I think it's going to the seaport sailing camp.



  27. #1812
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Meanwhile we scrape paint.



    Anne is just about done the Dunton's winch.



    She is taking out Phenoseal that she incorrectly used to seal the cracks and joints the day before.

    Scott is giving his seal of approval and advising what to do next.



    Scott and crew are carving up some more stock.





    Almost looks like cheese being cut.



  28. #1813
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We were working on the Sabino's wheelhouse when a good sized chunk of wood poked through the canvas door.







    Most likely, they are more Mayflower II parts.

    Amistad bottom paint is coming off. Last week they had "gooped" up a large area to scrape off.



    This week it was coming off using a propane torch. I questioned about the safety of that but there is no lead so it's ok. He is wearing the appropriate face mask.






  29. #1814
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Thanks for the update.

  30. #1815
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 8, 2016

    Starting out as usual in the engine shop, I found Nate working on the poor Palmer engine that has so much trauma in its long life.

    First it was used and not cared for to a point where the rust destroyed the water jacket. Then Nate repaired the rust and one of the guys dropped it on the floor doing more damage. Then Nate repaired that too. Most recently, Nate filled the block to look for leaks in the welding he had done. Welding cast iron is not impossible, but there is almost certainly going to be a leak or two and this was no exception. So on to plan B.

    After cleaning out the water jacket as well as possible, he washed out the inside with alcohol to get rid of any oil that might remain. The plan was to install a sealant used normally in old gas tanks. It worked quite well on the Studebaker engine he repaired a while back. The problem then was there was still a little water inside and it created a big mess that had to be removed before a second try was successful.

    This time he planned ahead. Here he has a heat gun warming the block to evaporate any alcohol that might still be inside.



    The other block is another Palmer engine, but a different model. It has the same rust problems. This time the outer walls are broken. You can see the solid clump of rust inside.



    Later I went back in and found that he had cut open the other block.



    Still having some big parts will help.



    There is still rust to be removed using a needle gun.



    The sealant on the first engine seems to have worked.

    It was Jim's 88th birthday last Saturday so we took him to lunch. He's a great guy with a wealth of knowledge on old engines.

    Happy Birthday, Jim.




  31. #1816
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We were asked to get the Conrad's life boat ready for a coat of paint. We had stripped the other life boat down to the bare wood a while ago. This time on this boat we scrape, sand, and paint.



    After we uncovered the gunnel and drained the puddle, we got to work.



    As you can see, just because we drained the puddle, it doesn't mean its all that dry.



    But Barbara is not put off by a little damp.



    In the meantime, Anne was putting the final touches on LA Dunton's winch.



    Then she came out ready to paint Conrad's yards.



  32. #1817
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1






    These things are huge, but...

    The story I heard was the original trainees in the 1800's were teased by sailors on other ships because as a training ship, everything was much smaller by comparison.

    I heard the forklift behind me and found the Garvey as she was hauled out. Something had happened recently. She was leaking fuel on her diesel, leaking water around and through her stuffing box, and something let go in the drive. Not everything was necessarily related, but all the symptoms needed to be tended to.



    Great to have a forklift.







    Note the stands and where they are located.


  33. #1818
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    It has been a couple of years since the last time it was hauled.



    No one in their right mind would stand downwind of the spray, but we were on the other side of the lifeboat and never felt a drop. When I got home my wife ordered me to strip. I couldn't smell a thing, but when I took off my clothes, it hit me. Ho Boy!

    Anyway, Doug was cleaning up the bilge while Dean was removing the prop. You could see where something got in between the prop and the strut that supports the bottom of the rudder.







    Most likely, John will be getting into the engine to see why it's leaking fuel.

    Meanwhile, Amistad is getting primed





  34. #1819
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Mayflower II.

    There is a lot of structural work going on in the stern.

    This entire deck will be replaced. There are a lot of problem areas.



    Several knees are bad.





    Chris has cut out a knee out.





    Here's a new piece going in.



    And I'll have to leave it here. There is just no room for me to get in to take pictures without getting in the way.

  35. #1820
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 15, 2016

    I walked into the paint shop in time to find the new name going onto the freshened up, Necessity.





    This is the same template he used the last time the boat was repainted. All he is doing here is outlining the letters using a centuries old technique.
    The template has a series of holes outlining the letters and a rag with charcoal is dusted on the surface.



    Then it's time to paint.



    Done.



    No skill needed! Anybody can do it. Yeah, right.

    Spring is coming. This is outside of the bakery.



    Of course it's only March and there is snow predicted for the weekend. We'll see on that one.


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