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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    For me, every day I am able to work at Mystic is a great day. Even when it's raining.



    Painting still went on.



    It was a raw day, but visitors still came.



    At times it was crowded.



    They were mostly students and they were taking notes. When they get back to school their assignment is to use their notes and write an essay about their visit to Mystic.



    They were all nice kids and America's future is safe.

  2. #72

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I'm enjoying this thread as much as the great J.Dillon trip thread awhile or so ago... great work, appreciate your (and all the Morgan people's) efforts on this boat and thread.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We all have our little rituals that rule our lives. One of mine is Mystic on Wednesdays. To start off the day I first stop in to the Café and Bake Shop for a muffin and tea. It is located in the rear of the Mystic Seaport Museum Store.

    I asked if I could take her picture and this is how she posed. She's a great person, but next week perhaps she will ask me to use a different picture.



    This week everyone is getting ready for Tugboat Weekend.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=48767F8 A-1E4F-379B-604E0E8C8F816C77

    This Wichmann Engine Co. type 2 AB engine was uncovered and a new bed was built for it to sit on.



    Sometime after lunch it was started up and run for a while. The EPA must love this one.



    More on this engine; http://library.mysticseaport.org/msc...sion=1992%2E65

    And more on the museum marine engine collection; http://library.mysticseaport.org/msca/engineindex.cfm

    The R.J. Schaefer Exhibit Hall, under construction in a previous entry, is now done. It will open for this weekend's "Tugs!" exhibit. There is a wonderful scale model of a walking beam engine on display.







    Taking pictures through the plastic case is a challenge. This model alone is worth the trip.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I have a cousin who, with her husband of almost 70 years, live in Western Massachusetts. They asked me if I wanted an old dinghy that they inherited from her father in the 50's.

    I have a small pond next to my house. I always thought a dinghy with Christmas presents and a small tree on the edge of the pond would make a pretty display for the holidays.

    I drove up to their home to pick it up and then I learned its history.

    My cousin's father bought the boat from General Electric in Pittsfield. The story I was told was that GE developed the fiberglass molding method for building nose cones on radar equipped planes in WW-II. After the war, in trying to decide what else to do with this new product, GE worked with the Beetle Boat Company to build experimental boats using fiberglass. According to my cousin there are still a few of them in the Pittsfield area.

    I decided that this boat was probably a pretty significant piece of history and a display out in the winter snow and ice would not be a good idea. My guess is that it is one of the oldest fiberglass boats in the world as it dates to 1947 or so.

    So for ten years it has hung from the ceiling in my garage with no expectations of ever using it at all.

    Then I met this guy in Mystic. No names, this is the Internet you know. He maintains all the small boats used in the sailing classes.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.c...6FCAC794ECD9D3



    I asked him if he could help me determine if the dinghy was sturdy enough for a small outboard and if it could be restored using the original materials. (Actually, it's in very good condition as it is.) He said advice was always free and sometimes good.

    So yesterday I took the dinghy with me out to Mystic. The good advice was, yes, she can certainly handle a small motor.

    Then I mentioned that perhaps Mystic might like it for the collection. So off we went to see the Man. And the Man came out to see the dinghy.




    He seemed excited about this find. For now, I was asked to take it home so the museum can do some research to substantiate all I have said about it. If all this is correct, it will probably be added to the collection.

    So for now, I'll keep you posted.

    PS; Do any of you know any more about this?

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    All winter long I waited for this picture.



    The saw has been in use all winter, just not when I was around. This is just another step in the roughing out of a futtock.

    It starts out as a tree and is cut into a slab 9" thick.




    Then it is roughed out with a chain saw.



    The template is traced for a line to cut on the band saw.



    The line is cut.



    Then there is more fine tuning.

    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 05-24-2010 at 09:19 AM. Reason: Adding a picture

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Once the futtock is cut to size more fitting is done on board.



    These things are heavy. The one estimate I heard was 500 lbs each.

    The saw can handle the size. It sits in a hole in the ground so the table is at a normal height.



    The table now has roller balls on the surface so the wood can be pushed around with relative ease.

    With that kind of weight I can understand how a ship will hog over time. The hogging is almost entirely gone now. After a year and a half of jacking the job is done.

    This is the head shipwright at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard. He is removing the last of the hydraulic jacks used to raise the stem.



    Meanwhile we paint and pretty soon we will begin scraping again.





    The missing parts are for inspection and will be replaced eventually.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Yesterday I found this note



    .

    After 18 months of a lot of pressure in the right places there is only three inches of hogging left. That may well be less than when she was launched in 1841.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    There were some engines from the Mystic Seaport Engine Collection running yesterday for the "Tugs!" event. There were a few small model engines running on compressed air but they are not so dramatic as when this monster started up.





    As I mentioned above, the EPA must love this one.



    It was running for some time when suddenly there was a lot more noise. The second cylinder finally lit up so she was running on all two. The ground shook!

    No shaking here. These are some of the models running on compressed air.







    This is just a sample of more to come on engines.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=C9C0254 2-AAAC-8C70-9F8BEDDAB342FD5F

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Please keep this coming. This is fascinating.
    Keep It Simple: KISS it better.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Thanks loads for your volunteering to help preserve this great ship ( bark) as well as all the others involved. Your posting of the progress is also to be commended for both the images and commentary. Please continue and maybe the read worthiness of this tour will filter down to the bilge.

    JD
    Senior Ole Salt # 650

  11. #81
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I have yet to go for a ride on Sabino but last week I was able to spend a few minutes on board.



    The boiler is coal fed and the room was really warm for a cool day.






    They were checking the water for, in this case, phosphorus. I don't have a clue.







    One of these days I will make the time to go for a ride.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=235D7A1 D-65B8-D398-70A5A17FB4422E8E

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    With lots of visiting students and the ongoing restoration of the Joseph Conrad an unusual opportunity came up today.

    The rigging crew needed to raise the fore topgallant and students with strong backs came in handy.

    Below, Mystic Seaport's chief rigger gives some preliminary instructions.



    The fore topgallant on the wharf.



    Half way up the foremast.



    The good hands at work turning the capstan.



    And all lined up.



    There were more students than places to work so half way up they switched crews. While the crew above worked the previous crew watched from the shade.



    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.c...E3F674FA3026CA
    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 05-26-2010 at 05:55 PM. Reason: Forgot the web site

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Often a team of people demonstrate the Dead Horse Ceremony, which was performed on some vessels to celebrate the end of the first month at sea. Since sailors were paid a one-month advance to settle their expenses ashore and outfit themselves before sailing (a sum that was frequently swindled from them), they did not begin to earn money until they had been at sea for a month. If the ship's captain agreed, they might amuse themselves by making a horse figure from canvas scraps and celebrate in a procession and song before hoisting the "dead horse" aloft and cutting it free to symbolize the end of their debt.

    The demonstration is about to start.






    The "Crew" parades the Dead Horse.



    The dead horse is hoisted above.



    And finally dropped overboard.



    Meanwhile we scrape paint. Only this time it's varnish.



    Here is more on the Special Demonstration Squad.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=BC1F10A 6-1E4F-379B-6093A67B21195187

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Nice pictures. Thank you.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Indeed, thanks for sharing.
    (and welcome back ACB ? from ancient member #34)

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Re on the Sabino:
    SWMBO & I got a ride on her during a WB Show years ago. A nuclear engineer from Groton back down the road was chewing the fat with the Sabino's engineer. The two comparing notes on their similar/very different engines was a hoot.
    It was a nice way to relax and see the river too, BTW.

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Almost forgot.
    Thanks for this marvelous thread.
    You're one fortunate guy getting to work there.
    Thanks again for sharing that.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The Morgan is the world's oldest tanker/production platform. I remember crawling around her when she was still in her sand berth and it's great to see that Mystic is doing the right thing here. ClassicBoat, latest issue, sez that she will be restored to sail again which is a great goal. (I'm not certain that they should actually go sailing though. The insurance bill would be pretty staggering for one thing.)

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Mystic Seaport hired a vendor to come in and teach us lead paint removal safety. There has been nothing wrong with the method we have been using except for the cleanup and documentation.

    Mystic Air Quality Consultants, Inc. gave an eight hour seminar on the proper way to clean up and document what we have done.

    http://www.mysticair.com/

    The instructor spent 29 years in the Navy and knows first hand the problems that lead poisoning can cause.



    Most of us probably have a somewhat cavalier attitude, my self included, when it comes to things like this, but not any more.

    Working on old wooden boats can be hazardous to your health!

    I am not going to give any advice here on lead paint removal except to say; Protect yourself, clean up twice and keep the kids away.

    The instructor showed a short video where a young child with an estimated IQ of 130/140 had dropped to 80 after exposure to lead. That is 80 for life!

    Young children are especially vulnerable because their brains are not fully developed yet.


    Here we are practicing testing for lead






    The instructor is showing how the HEPA vacuum works. He used red powdered chalk to show how each media can filter fine particles.




    He taught us how to build a sealed door to keep the dust contained.




    This is not going to be fun on a hot day.



    At the end of the seminar we all took a test. I got one wrong, not too bad.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    In the documentation phase, did they make a point about documenting specifically where removal activities are being done so that future work in that area can depend on the documentation and not have a need for the full lead regime? Photo's can be your friend!

    Likewise, if work is beginning in an adjacent area as yet untreated, it alerts you that the full regime is required which is good for one's ongoing health! Again, photo's can be your friend!

    Actually, in the 8 hour training, I am sure you heard it all. For everyone else, please note the care that needs to be taken.
    Last edited by PaulC; 06-04-2010 at 08:00 PM. Reason: incomplete thoughts...

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I just have an assortment of pictures here.

    We spent the day on the Conrad last week taking off and reapplying varnish.

    Here a new volunteer is reapplying a coat to the port rail.



    Another crew was installing a canopy over the helm as it gets pretty hot on deck during the summer.



    It's not quite finished here but you can get an idea of what it will be.



    Another sample of eye candy for the small wooden boat lover. This hangs on the port side of Conrad.



    We did accomplish a bit on the Morgan. We reinstalled two doors that we spent the winter scraping and painting.

    The one on the left is a head and the door on the right is storage .



    Then as I left for the day I passed the Amistad where a crew member was working on the bowsprit.


  22. #92
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    While redoing the varnish on Conrad the kids are coming and going all the time. The Conrad is a dorm and training ship for kids who want to learn to sail.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=732054A 0-C32D-85DA-42272CE5DE4954D4

    The new counselor, standing here on deck, is having her first lesson on climbing the rigging. I did that years ago, ONCE! That part of my life is done.





    Understandably nervous, she started up.







    Then others tried it too.

    Not me, I'm done.





    I'm happy to scrape, sand, and varnish.



    I am hoping to get back on the Morgan soon. There is still a lot of scraping and painting needed there.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    great thread-keep it up
    "Rise Again Majestic Spirit"

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Annie has yet to be roused from her winter's hibernation. She needs a new mast and the yard is hard at work on a new one.




    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=4F14BE0 7-B8FE-B1BB-9AB330C09B2F125B

    The new mast is being fabricated in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard building out of a single piece of sitka spruce. It measures just over 39 feet long. Beautiful, straight grain, with not a single knot to be found.



    It will be shaped using a chainsaw and hand planes.

    First it is cut square, then octagonal, then what ever 16 sides is called, and finally hand planed round from there.

    Here the men are cutting it square. There is a guide mounted along the top of the beam and the chainsaw is mounted on a wooden slide.





    Take a guess what this piece of wood cost.

    Does $13,000 sound about right?

    Is there any wonder why I include this next line?

    https://secure2.convio.net/mystic/si...donation=form1

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Big sale!

    Scott says "Everything must go!"




    Well not exactly, but for wooden boat builders, this can be a good deal.

    Scott is cleaning up the yard in preparation for the annual Wooden Boat Show.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=864E118 B-1E4F-379B-6036692662F21863

    During the Charles W Morgan's restoration, small lots of extra lumber have been piling up in the yard. Now they are becoming too large and it's time to move them along. If you have the need, Scott has the wood. Several sizes and many species are available.

    When you come to the Wooden Boat show you should find Scott somewhere in the ship yard.

    I don't know how this will be sold. By the board? By the pile? Preset price or auction?

    If I find out more about it I will edit this entry.

    Now I know. The wood is being sold for $1.50 per board foot for any species

    Meanwhile, here is a look at what has piled up so far.









    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 06-23-2010 at 04:12 PM. Reason: Add the price

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We have been working on the Joseph Conrad for the last couple of weeks removing varnish and then making her pretty again. I brought my 87 year old father in law along to help.

    He did a good amount of work that day.

    My wife called him the next day to see if he had a good time. He did, but his arm hurt.

    He said, "But that's ok, at least I know why."



    If it moves salute it - if it doen't move, paint it.

    Not a lot of saluting at Mystic Seaport but there sure is a lot of painting.











    The kids will be coming soon and Conrad will be ready.

    This is one your kids or grand kids won't soon forget.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.c...272CE5DE4954D4

  27. #97
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I just found out the deal on the extra wood the shipyard is selling this weekend at Mystic Seaport.

    You can buy any species they have for $1.50 per board foot.

    Just go to the ship yard, find Scott or one of his volunteers and they should be able to help you.

    If you are close enough to come to Mystic Seaport, this may be just what you need.

    Wooden Boat magazine is sponsoring the Wooden Boat Show at the seaport this weekend. This is the biggest event of the summer at Mystic.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=864E118 B-1E4F-379B-6036692662F21863

  28. #98
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Some sixty frames have been replaced and there are just over 100 to go.

    After the Sawzall cuts through the trunnels and other fasteners, some times a big hammer is needed to remove the old futtock.



    Sooner or later everything will need to be replaced. For now, the good news is, the futtocks near the keel are in such good shape, most of them do not need to be replaced. 169 years old and they are still good. The shipwrights are making efforts to save as much of the original ship as reasonably possible.




    Out in the yard new techniques are being tried all the time. They yard modified a chain saw with a pair of steel flanges bolted directly to the bar. Now it resembles an over sized jigsaw. This appears to reduce the time it takes to rough out a futtock.





    The cut can be made in one pass.



    On the large band saw the yard has installed a gantry system to support the heavy end of a futtock while it is being cut. The original method was to roll the futtock around on a large set of roller balls.





    The original roller table is just to the right above.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Man Overboard?

    Not something you ever want to hear is it?

    Working on the Conrad this week there was a crew training for one of several demonstrations put on by the seaport all summer long. There are many different demonstrations scheduled every day. When you come you can get a list of time and place for each.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=83ADE94 5-65B8-D398-710ADB0FBE725EAB

    Or..


    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=8A03EC7 A-1E4F-379B-605BEEFCFD015E0A



    After the "Man Overboard" alert was sounded the whole crew jumped into action. Of course Conrad hasn't left the dock so all a real victim would need to do is swim a few feet.

    After the ship is stopped a crew gets the small boat ready to launch.



    The line takes the load of the chain that secured the boat to the davits.



    The boat is lowered.



    The crew boards.






    Off they go to pick up the hapless soul who was unlucky enough to fall in.



    Last year before I started to volunteer at the seaport I watched a different kind of rescue technique. I'll look for the pictures.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Quote Originally Posted by Morgan Volunteer View Post


    The original roller table is just to the right above.
    Thank you for all the posts on the restoration!

    What is the function of the jug and hoses above the upper guides on this saw?

    Speaking of man-overboard: I was on the schooner Shenandoah in 1979 tied up at the Mystic Seaport warf after an incredible run from Vineyard Haven. The passengers were a group of boy scouts. One was trying to climb up to the main rigging when he fell getting past the lanyards and landed in the river. It was the first time anyone had fallen off the boat, and luckily it was at the warf. The next morning, they all got a stern talking to from the captain and mate at breakfast before we set out again.

    Brian

  31. #101
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Regarding the question above, I don't know, but I will ask.

    In my last post I showed the demonstration crew practicing for a man overboard on the Joseph Conrad.

    A couple of years ago I watched a different rescue technique that the crew demonstrated on the green.

    If a ship went aground near enough to shore but the sea was too dangerous to row out for a rescue, a Lyle gun would shoot a line out to the stricken ship.

    http://www.mainememory.net/bin/Detail?ln=13548

    A heavier line would be attached up in the mast and then the sailors would come to shore in the breeches buoy.

    This is the mast on the green at Mystic Seaport.



    The rescue crew is setting up the rig for rescue.













    More in the next post

  32. #102
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1









    Another crew saved.

    And another place I hope never to be.

  33. #103
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The annual Wooden Boat Show was this weekend at Mystic Seaport.



    It was my first time there for the show and I was surprised that most of these beautiful boats were open to go aboard. I was also surprised at the number of displays and vendors in attendance. They were all over the place!

    The first boat I saw was Star Song.









    Just ahead of Star Song.



    I am limited to six pictures per entry so tomorrow I will have more.

  34. #104
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I think I can answer the question about the jug & lines on the shipsaw - it is for blade lubricant. The blade gets pretty hot when trying to cut curves and bevels on dense wood, so lubricant is applied to the blade to cool and grease it. Often this is dish soap or liquid floor wax, but every shipsaw operator has his favourite slush.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  35. #105
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    More pictures from last weekend's Wooden Boat Show.





    There was a lot of boat building going on.







    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 06-29-2010 at 09:55 AM. Reason: I wasn't done

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