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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #386
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Last week I had the good fortune to be on board the Morgan during an interview with six of the shipwrights and their supervisor.

    The Mystic Seaport film crew is setting up.




    Waiting for everyone to arrive and get set up.




    Finally everyone was ready.








    They talked for almost an hour on the various aspects of restoring a One of a kind icon of American craftsmanship. From trying to understand how the original shipwrights were able to accomplish building the Morgan to what that same shipwright might say if he could be brought forward to see the restoration that is going on now.

    One shipwright’s opinion was that he would be very familiar with the hull as it is now, but when he saw the electric lights it might fry his brain.


    The Seaport's video will be edited and part of a larger production. I will include a link as soon as it is available.

  2. #387
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Things are really cooking now. The ceiling planks are going in fast.



    This one was too long but the part that needed steaming was inside.

    Just block it off with an old drop cloth.



    Once inside it needs to be clamped into place.



    As part of the deal to get the Packard PT Boat engines the engine shop built new machine gun mounts for the PT Boats on display at Battleship Cove.

    Here are the new ones. Here, one is painted and the other is not.






    The crewman stood inside this and fired two Browning M-2 machine guns.

    Wooden Boats and Iron Men! Not much changed in 235 years our Navy has been around.

  3. #388
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I love this thread...

    How they bring the cooked timber inside before it cool off? They made a hole in the hull?

  4. #389
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    This is a great thread... I hope to visit this summer with the kids!

  5. #390
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    To JoshuaIII above,

    There are two holes in the bow, one on either side. You can see them in earlier posts where other parts are being hoisted inside. A futtock will be installed in the opening when all the ceiling planks are on board. Then the inside can be sealed up.


    To JCosta, above,

    I hope you can make it. I am usually there on Wednesday. Stop by and say hello.

  6. #391
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The Packard engines have arrived.



    One of them is a goner. When the display mount was removed they found this. It looks like a rod came through.



    It was a bit of a surprise but this engine is not complete and was never going to be more than a parts engine.

    A quick look into the other engine and it looks good. The bores look clean and the cams are smooth. Once everything is cleaned and pre-oiled the crew will crank it slowly and pump oil though it. When they are satisfied it is well lubricated they will put the plugs back in to see it there is compression.



    The blower housing.



    Below is the part that spins. It is likely geared up from crankshaft speed but at this time the amount is unknown. A manual is on order.

    The two flat covers behind the blower are the distributors.




  7. #392
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A Single overhead cam with four valves per cylinder.



    Now onto another art form.

    I was walking back from lunch yesterday when I took this picture.





    It says Mystic Maritime Gallery on the awning.

    I didn't really plan to use it until I received the Mystic Seaport eNewsletter this morning.



    32nd Annual Modern Marine Masters Exhibition and Sale


    May 1-June 12/Open daily, 10 a.m.- 5 p.m.
    The Maritime Art Gallery

    This annual exhibition showcases the timeless beauty of ships and the sea. On view are works that inspire the artist's spirit, including classic racing yachts, elegant modern vessels, everyday working boats and men who make their living from the sea along with scenes of busy harbors and serene beaches.
    Call 860.572.5388 for more information.

    One of the paintings bit me last fall and I have it in my family room.

    And more art and beauty.


    This is in the stern.





    Somthing else from the Mystic Seaport eNewsletter.

    http://www.thewoodenboatshow.com/
    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 05-05-2011 at 01:37 PM.

  8. #393
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I love that little boat. She's beautiful.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  9. #394
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    We have finished 3/4 of the bulwarks on deck. The last quarter is getting close to where we can start painting so now we've moved onto the outer bulkhead (wall?) of the galley. Pictures of scraping paint are not that interesting but it's what we do.



    In the hold a shipwright is measuring and cutting a template to guide the shaping of the next ceiling plank.







    Trial fit.



    Copy the outline in the barn.



    The next day it will be in the steamer and then installed. (I won't be there for it. I'm only there on Wednesday.)

    The LA Dunton's bowsprit appears to be done.


  10. #395
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Skua number one will be wet sanded next.



    Outside the crew is still building the scaffolding at the bow of the Morgan.

    I believe the stem needs replacing. Probably other parts too.



    This piece of wood has been sitting out near the shipyard entrance for a couple of years and it's a pretty good bet it will be the new stem.



    The seaport is loaded with small buildings. Just off the starboard bow of the Morgan is where all the small boats used in the seaport sailing camp are maintained. The right side door was open and I took a peek. This is where all the outboards are stored. They are used to watch over the kids as they learn to sail.



    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=437A9BEC-1E4F-379B-606FCAC794ECD9D3

    Just before quitting time the sky opened up. It's true about New England. If you don't like the weather, wait a minute.





    Ten minutes later it was clear.

  11. #396
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The weather is warming up and visitors are coming.



    They were nice kids and it was great to meet them.

    Out on the bow the stem has some real problems and bad parts are coming off.











    Rain water is tough on wooden boats.

  12. #397
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I am going to wear another hat for a while.

    I asked the shipyard director if the Morgan had a coin under her mast. Then I asked if there were plans to reuse that coin or if a new coin would be used. I suggested that the seaport use a replacement 1841 coin plus a brand new coin minted the year the mast will be replaced.

    His answer was, yes, there was a coin under the mast and it is now stored in the museum's archives. He also said that when the Amistad was built they placed a vintage coin from Sierra Leone and a new American coin under her mast. Amistad's human cargo of slaves originally came from Sierra Leone.

    He then said, "Good idea, you're in charge."

    The staff is really busy these days!

    So my paint scraping partner made an appointment for us to see the coin on Wednesday this week. When we arrived the Vice President of Collections and Research met us and had the coin with him.

    Turns out there were three coins.



    The large 1997 silver dollar was found under the main mast. Most likely it was placed there after another restoration but that's way before my time. My partner is going to do some research on it.

    The center coin was found under the foremast and it is in very bad condition. We could not make out any detail on it. It appears to be copper due to the green corrosion on it.

    The coin on the right was found under the mizzen. It is pictured here. Some of the detail is fair, but there is no date visible. My guess is that it is made of silver. The little corrosion there is, is black. It appears to be dirty more than corroded.




    The color is exaggerated here to show the details more clearly.

    The seaport used to publish a journal called the Log. There will be answers available in old copies. My partner is going to research older restorations to see if she can find out about the 1997 coin.

    Below, she and the VP of Collections and Research are scanning a book to start the search.



    Any ideas out there?

    Anyone know if the coins can be cleaned up without doing harm? Anything done will be under the museum's control. I had to wear white cotton gloves to handle them.

    Does anyone recognize the "silver"coin?

    Any ideas?

    On to other pictures.


    This hangs in the archives reception area. It is from a Chinese Flower boat.




    Must have been a pretty fancy boat.





    http://www.marinersmuseum.org/collec...se-flower-boat

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ralphre...og/4105450146/



  13. #398
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The middle coin looks like a Barber coin, circa late 1800's or early 1900's. Here is a link,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_...Barber_coinage

    Good luck on your hunt for a new offering to Poseidon, a very important job!

    P.S. As to cleaning the following excerpts are taken from a coin collecting site,

    Clean dark silver coins with ammonia, vinegar, rubbing alcohol, lemon juice or polish remover with aceton. Allow coins to soak in a container of the liquid until any dirt or encrustation has been dislodged.
    Air-dry or pat them dry with a soft, clean cloth. Do not rub or polish. This may scratch the surface of the coin and will remove metal from the coin's surface.

    Copper coins tend to look worse after being cleaned and are more easily ruined than gold or silver coins. When absolutely necessary, clean dirty, green crusted, badly corroded copper coins without scrubbing them. Try soaking them in grape oil (or olive oil if grape oil is not available). Some results can be obtained in one to four days, but don't be afraid to wait several weeks, months, or even a year for desired results.


    I've used these methods on 20th century coins without any visual damage, never had any coins appraised for numismatic value.
    Last edited by Geoff Plante; 05-13-2011 at 07:13 AM.

  14. #399
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    This is a brilliant thread, thanks so much.
    Gerard>
    ​Freeland, WA

    Resistance is NOT futile.

  15. #400
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Thank you for your input.

    Since the Barber coin is too late to be original to the Morgan's construction in 1841 it must have come from another rebuild.

    Obviously the 1997 silver dollar is not original so that leaves the mystery coin from the foremast. I did not measure the diameter of that coin but with a bit of searching I found that the silver dollar is 40.6 mm (1.598 in) and the Barber coin is 27.5 mm (1.08 in). The mystery coin is in between.

    It appears to be copper due to the green corrosion. I doubt cleaning it will reveal any details but you never know.

    Care to guess what it might be?


  16. #401
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I've had no luck trying to find anything close to that mystery coin. It's diameter is going to be a good key as there are very few coins that large in the 1840's. One possibility is the 1840 seated liberty dollar. This coin was made of a 90/10 silver/copper allow that once exposed to salt may have corroded to produce the item seen in the center (although I'm skeptical). It's diameter is 1.5 inches (38.1mm). As far as I can find there were no U.S. coins made of copper as large as the one shown in your picture.
    Other possibilities are that it is foreign (I checked brit coins, although unlikely at that time, no match) or it isn't legal tender but is a specially struck medallion.
    Suggest the grape oil and see if any details emerge.

  17. #402
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Two weeks ago a shipwright was making this template to shape the end of the next ceiling plank.



    Below in the stern is where the new plank was installed. The angled part is also beveled to fit against the keelson. (If keelson is what it is called at this point.)



    After one end is held in place with trunnels the other will get cut to length. No magic here, just a circular saw and the skill to use it well. All the butt joints are practically seamless.

    The original 1841 shipwrights did yacht-like work and so do the 2011 shipwrights.

    Sorry, no picture of the circular saw.



    Outside, the bow from a different angle.




    One of Morgan's whaleboats.



    The LA Dunton bowsprit is almost done. Here it was getting moved to paint where is has been supported.


  18. #403
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I stopped into the yard about a week ago today. I was just passing through aboard the schooner Rachel B. Jackson which was berthed at Mystic Seaport for about a week. My, what a sight. It has been some years since I have been to Mystic Seaport and I was pleasantly reminded of what a place it was. It was nice to be able to see in real life what I had been looking at pictures of on the WBF. What a project the Charles W. Morgan is. Truly amazing. Keep up up the good effort!

    - Cam
    "And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by..."

  19. #404
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Harpooner tryouts.

    I didn't tell him to smile, I told him to look like he was going to kill something.

    He smiled anyway.




    A whale ship can always use another harpooner.



    I have a little more information about the coins under Morgan's mast. I went back to the Collections and Research Department where all the valuable artifacts are stored and had another look at the "Mystery Coin."

    A thread member above suggested it may be an 1840 seated liberty dollar. He said it is 90% silver and 10% copper. The copper might explain the green corrosion. He also said it is 1 1/2 inches in diameter.

    Yesterday I measured the coin and it is 1 1/2" in diameter. Now I am 99% sure it is a silver dollar.

    My partner in this is going to research the museums archives to see if she can find more information about the coins that have been found. We started in the Documentation office.



    Below is part of the Documentation office with files for researching projects. This set of files is duplicated elsewhere in safe storage. These are available for staff to use.





    Removed from Morgtan two weeks ago. It appears to be in good shape. The original is stored in Collections and Research.


  20. #405
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Some of the detail.



    While poking around in the Documentation office we found this book with copies of invoices related to whaling. While we did not find the Morgan's name on any of these it is still fascinating to see what different companies bought from and sold to whale ships.








  21. #406
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A project almost as big and complicated as rebuilding the Morgan is making a computer model of her.

    Every plank, trunnel, frame, and piece of hardware that makes up the Morgan is being replicated on the computer.



    In this printout the current plan is to replace the red planks. The yellow planks may be replaced and the dark brown planks will remain.

    However----This plan may change tomorrow.



    Up on the bow, the stem is still being disassembled. Here the shipwrights are driving out the copper bolts that hold it together.



    The steel head on the drift makes it an easier target to hit.





    From the inside.


  22. #407
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Two more pictures from the bow.



    The stem is made from a lot of parts.


  23. #408
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    is this restoration taking more than 9 months?

  24. #409
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The original estimate was 3 to 5 years to put her back into sailing condition. Right now it looks closer to the five years.

    The original build was in the nine month time frame but there were many more people working on her and they only had to build it from the bottom up. They also had twelve hour days and six days per week.

    Our guys have to rebuilt her from the inside out and it has to be correct to the original design.

    As a museum artifact everything has to be done as correctly as possible and when it is not possible it needs to be documented so future generations will know it. We certainly wouldn't want to pass along the Morgan with a fiberglass hull.

  25. #410
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    My paint scraping partner and I went for a walk during lunch.

    The weather has rained every Wednesday for five weeks in a row. This day was no exception. Tomorrow looks better.

    Outside looking in.



    Sabino is running early this year.






    Back inside this is from the Morgan.



    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 05-24-2011 at 09:30 AM.

  26. #411
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    More steaming and more planking.



    This is the stern.



    Looking forward.






    The steering wheel for the Skua is turned from a solid piece of purple heart.





    It is turned from the solid as a wooden bowl would be made.


  27. #412
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    shouldn't all this inside work be done by whale oil lamps?

  28. #413
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The number two Skua had all its joints strengthened with the white compound you can see in the picture. I didn't ask what it is.



    It's just about ready for the deck to be installed.

    Over in the engine shop some of the final details are being put back on the current steam engine restoration.



    The beautifully polished copper pipe is supposed to be covered with asbestos. Naturally it will not be asbestos and it's too pretty to cover up, so....

    We'll see.



    The guys now have a serious itch to scratch. They want to make the Packard PT boat engines look like new.

    Now they look like this.



    Soon, one of them will look like this. And it will be running.


  29. #414
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Many school groups have students answer questions as they tour the seaport.

    Checking off another "Find."



    Here's another student lagging behind as the others were running around. This student was deep in thought studying the map of the seaport.



    At least they'll know where to go next. Someone is paying attention.



    The pictures above were taken from the gallery above the floor of the Dupont Preservation Shipyard building.

    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=05F74191-D78C-D0C6-64E2AB6C7E72F3B6

    Below, the steamer had a ceiling plank cooking for four hours and now it's time to put it in place. This one was small but since it's hot, the shipwrights still used the lift truck to get it into the ship.






  30. #415
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Once inside, the plank needs to be clamped in place before it cools.

    Time is of the essence!



    Here you can see the curve they need to work to.



    Clamps hold it down.



    Watching the job was a group of students escorted by a seaport guide.



    Now for some fine tuning.

    The plank is hammered down to mate with the one already in place. Since I try to not use flash, you can barely make out the head of the sledge as is swings down to its target.



    In the stern the shipwright is guiding the end into place.

    Guiding might not be the best term. He is telling the guy at the other end to hit it again.


  31. #416
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    On the other end more persuasion is added.

    Again, no flash.





    And more clamping.





    Finally it was all done.





    And so were they.



    Now all they have to do is add the trunnels.

    Easy!

    Right?

    Why anybody could do it.

    Yeah, right!

    When it's done a playing card will not fit between the joints.

  32. #417
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Meanwhile more planks are coming down the pipeline. This one did not need steaming.





    This one is going in the starboard opening. I didn't go up to see it placed, but my guess is that it will go on the port side of the bilge. This would be the only way to clear all the stanchions standing on the keel.



    Up on deck the shipyard director (On the right) is interviewed by The Boston Globe.



    I heard they are doing a feature for this weekend's edition.

    The photographer checking out the tryworks.



    Meanwhile up in the bow, the hawse pipe and other hardware are coming out.

    The hawes pipe weighs quite a bit so they secured it with chain.

    Not his best side.


  33. #418
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    After much hammering the pipe and other hardware came out.



    The sledge has just hit the drift which has bounced down to the lower right.



    The port side was already out.




    Outside it clears the hull and can be lowered to the ground.



    Looking straight down.




  34. #419
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Now for the last piece

    First you hear the thud, then you hear the aaugh!



    It's a real heavy sledge and the guys take turns. As you saw, it came out hard.





    Down in the DuPont building, the bowsprit for the Dunton appears to be done.





    Last for today, the number two skua had the deck roughed in.


  35. #420
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Always enjoy your updates , I have a question though.In this pic in the lower right hand side leaning up against a bin with an arguer bit sticking out of it.... is that a right angle drill ??


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