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Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #2066
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    The deck overhead is supported too.



    This support is sitting on top of the I beam spanning through the hull.

    So it's good to be home, but I could do without the snow in the forecast.

  2. #2067
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 14, 2017

    I found Dean milling a rather large piece of steel on the Bridgeport. He said it's a throat halyard crane for the LA Dunton. The original is a forging but shops that produce schooner hardware are no longer making parts like this anymore. The blank looks real expensive.

    He is milling the square part into a 16 sided figure and later will grind it round. Basically it's the same process I've seen done to make round masts out of square timbers.

    He is using a 45 degree cutter to make the square into eight sides at this point.



    Now it will be round.



    Tom has been working on a new mast for Dunton for a while. He told me the crane will attach to the rings he is fitting to the mast.



    It snowed last week and over the weekend.

    A pile of snow is never pretty.





    Leave it alone and things look nice, but I can't wait for spring to clean things up.

    I'm pretty sure those are Dyer Dhows sleeping under the snow.



  3. #2068
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Doug asked for help on the Morgan. He and Karl took a boat over and I walked. My job was to turn on and off the circuit breakers running the ice eaters. Some of them were not working. After I turned off the power they hauled them up to see if they were fouled.

    Long story short, the bow ice eaters had tripped the ground fault and the port side stern was fouled with a plastic bag. If there is any one reason to go back to paper, this would be it. Plastic bags litter the bottom.



    The deck is covered with salt and it's washing out the scuppers.







    This job done, I went back to the paint shop to get warm.

    Noah has been refinishing the inside of the Sabino wheel house, and here he is applying varnish to the doors.



    Our job last week was supposed to be sorting out literally tons of screws, nuts, and bolts in the basement of the documentation building. This is an old small house located in the shipyard. We ended up painting the rails used for the overhead dolly system to be used on Mayflower II. Ann showed me what has been done so far with the sorting i
    n the basement of the house. Someone else got the job. What a job!

    Three walls are lined with five gallon pails.




  4. #2069
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1





    Boy you need to be careful using a snowblower on a dirt driveway.

    Gary, Ann, and I spent most of the afternoon breaking up the ice.



    The drains were covered with ice so we had to find them first.

    By the way, that is the documentation building in the back. The gray house.



    Working right next to Mayflower II, I was able to take a look at what's going on.

    The first few planks up from the garboard are coming off.



    Louie is working on a stubborn piece around a fastener.



    Anthony is working with Louie.



  5. #2070
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    More is also coming off on the port side.



    The garboard has been removed here so they could get the stem out last week.

    Looking inside where the stem had been. Here you can see why she needed a lot of help.



    I'm not sure what is going on here. This is the boarding ramp coming off. The crane also lifted a lot of lumber up and on board.

    More later on this, I suppose.



  6. #2071
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 21, 2017

    Dean is continuing to make the throat halyard crane for the LA Dunton's mast. One side is done. Here he's taking the octagon and shaping it into sixteen sides.



    Now he's grinding the 16 sides into a round.



    The ends will have an 1 3/4" thread cut into them.

    Nate found that the Wolverine engine had no compression. So they crew decided to take it apart to see why. The heads are fouled with carbon so after that was cleaned he lapped the valves. Each valve has a pair of holes so Nate's home made valve lapping tool made the job easy.





    There are five holes in the combustion chamber. Intake and exhaust are obvious. The pre-combustion chamber it to the rear with the little holes drilled into the side. The wick is in there along with the injector nozzle. The hole to the right of the white cap is where air is injected into the engine to start the engine rotating at start up. The Atlas engine starts the same way. The last hole just out of sight to the left is a blow off valve port. Again, the Atlas has this too. If at any time the pressure is to high the valve will pop open to protect the engine.

    You can see the valve in operation back in August of 2013. The guys were starting the Atlas for the first time when Jim got a face full when it went off. It occurs at a minute and thirty seconds into the video. Later they figured out how to avoid that from happening. The Wolverine engine uses the same system.








  7. #2072
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    With the head cleaned and ready, they pulled out a piston to see how it looks. The assumption has been that it was running when the engine was salvaged. However it's been sitting for a long time and things may not be as smooth as they would like. An inspection of the rings was in order.

    Undoing the connecting rod.



    In order to keep the rod cap from falling down into the sump, Nate propped it up with a 2x4.



    It was hard coming out in the beginning. The was just a bit of carbon buildup at the top and the rings couldn't pass it. A little clean up solved the problem.



    The bore looks great.



    I had work to do so I left. When I returned they had the piston out and ready to be cleaned.



    Again I had work to do and when I got back it was installed and now there are two cylinders left to do.



    My work? Scrape paint of course.

  8. #2073
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Quote Originally Posted by Morgan Volunteer View Post


    The new Garvey.





    I am assuming this will be the rub rail. (Is that the right term here?) It was not there later on.


    Walt wasn't kidding last summer when he talked about how big the garvey was going to be.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  9. #2074
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Anne and I scraped the bottoms of three whale boats.



    This lady (Elyssa I think) stopped by. She works in marketing at the seaport. She has something to do with the seaport and Facebook. Now whether or not the picture she took of Anne appears on Facebook, I have no idea. I don't struggle too much with Wooden Boat Forum any more. Facebook? Maybe later.



    This job involves a lot of dust.





    At this point, we don't have a lot of jobs ahead of us. There are two reasons for that. The first is that the Mayflower II project is a project the Mayflower/Plimouth Association (For lack of an official name) is paying for. I was told they can't charge for volunteer hours. Secondly, if we do get involved, the Mayflower II is by comparison to the Morgan a rather starkly built ship. Even though the Morgan was a working whaler, she had nicely finished details. The Mayflower II is a bare bones sort of boat. I don't recall seeing a lot of painted surfaces. We'll have to wait and see what happens.

    Meanwhile the work does go on. While I can't help too much, I can take pictures.

    A plank is almost off.



    A moment ago he was whacking it with a sledge. Now he's prying it.





  10. #2075
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Off comes the old wood.



    New wood is on the way.



    They are cutting almost all the time.





    I am very curious about this one. It looks like a cork screw. They told me it's live oak and most of the live oak they have is strange looking like this.





  11. #2076
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    February 28, 2017

    Nate had finished cleaning the number two cylinder on the Wolverine engine and he and Scott were torquing down the head.



    At lunch I asked Nate if he had compression it it when he finished. He said he could feel a bounce when he got it up to TDC. (Top dead center) So, two down and one to go.

    Later in the afternoon Nate had the third head off and cleaned up. One valve need a bit of help beyond lapping it in. So as I left to go home, he and Jim headed off to a machine shop to get the one valve ground.

    Jim had been in the automotive business all his life. As a small child he was helping out in his dad's garage. When Dad retired, Jim took over. So, Jim knows all the older shops in the New London area including the shops that work on really big marine engines. If they were lucky, the shop would be able to do it as they waited. We'll see next week.

    Dean has been making a throat halyard crane for LA Dunton. The machining goes on.

    The two inner arms are tapered.



    As the end mill makes a cut, Dean is using a file to smooth out the finished side.



    Later in the day I found Dean and Scott working on another fitting for the throat halyard crane.







    This is what they eventually want to make. I'm not sure what it's for.




  12. #2077
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    There hasn't been too much for us to do. We cleaned the concrete pad part of the ship lift. Again.



    Meanwhile, the crew has started to finish up the base of the enclosure for the Mayflower II.







    Just inside, Jamie and Chris are building the lower deck for the scaffolding.



    When done, this temporary building will cover the Mayflower II for the duration of her restoration.





  13. #2078
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    In the paint shop this whale boat is all done and ready to see the light of day again.



    Out she comes.



    The next step was to put it into the straps that would allow her to be turned over.



    And over she goes.



    And now back into the carrying straps.



    Off to the Morgan. (Or where ever they plan to store it for now.)



  14. #2079
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    When they came back they had another whale boat. This one is used next to the Morgan and is set up so kids can climb on board.



    It needs a little TLC. It's not to go in the water but it wouldn't take too much to make her seaworthy. Everything we found is solid. For now, her work will be cosmetic.

    We peeled back the canvas.



    And took down the frame.



    Meanwhile out side the guys are hard at work sawing the live oak.



    And roughing out parts.

    Stern post?







  15. #2080
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    Default

    You've probably already answered this question on here, perhaps even more than once, but I couldn't find it so I apologize for asking again if you've already addressed it. With all the work being done to the Dunton, is there talk of putting her to sea again? A schooner makes a fine training platform no matter how you skin it. Much simpler to run than a lot of other sail training platforms, and there's a steady supply of examples of how to make a working schooner financially sustainable in the modern world (training, corporate team building, day sails, overnight trips, charters, etc.). There could be a future in getting underway again for the Dunton, and it could be good business for the seaport. Any rumors floating around?
    "And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by..."

  16. #2081
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 7, 2017

    At one time I heard "Management" say that LA Dunton will not be restored anytime soon. There are too many examples of schooners around used for the purposes you mention to make it a financially reasonable to restore her now. That said, "Never say never." Brilliant sails all summer long with paying passengers. (This is not necessarily a correct term for the people on board. Naval law can be funny, so I am not making a claim that people pay for a ride. I am not "management" So cross I am crossing my T's and dotting my I's.)

    That said, (again) Check this.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/learn/...iant-programs/

    At this point from what I have heard, Dunton is not strong enough to sail. She will remain a static display for the time being. If I ever hear more, I will certainly post it here.

    So on to yesterday.

    Anne and I kept busy doing some dusting. We started out in the Visitors Reception Center, dusting the crew boat (?) that hangs upside down over head.



    Then we moved on to the cat boat shed next to the Conrad.

    Broom and Swiffer in hand we worked until lunch.





    On the way to lunch, Anne mentioned that there was a class going on inside the print shop. So we stopped in.

    This is called HMS Navigator program and it is from the Hamden Middle School in Hamden, Connecticut. This is a program where students get hands on training in other fields not normally associated with a middle school curriculum.

    We found these two student learning how to print on a 1902 printing press.



    They set the type and made a test run.




    First run had a couple of corrections to be made.

    You can see the errors right away, but reading type
    is a skill that comes with time.



    So fix it guys.

  17. #2082
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    And fix it, they did.








    There is more to this. I made an appointment to go and see what they are doing.

    The Navigators are building six boats. They did this last year and then auctioned off the boats.

    When I get back, I'll post more about this program.

    ________________________

    I spent a couple of hours at Hamden Middle School this afternoon.

    It turns out, there were about twenty students at the seaport yesterday. I only saw the two above. Others were in the blacksmith shop, a kitchen somewhere on campus, coopers shop, the planetarium, and a couple of other places I did not hear about. Each student had a hands on approach to learning about a trade.

    I walked into a class room where about ten or twelve kids were building the boats.



    The boats are copied from
    boat kits similar to the kits used at the seaport during the wooden boat show.

    They layout the plans and use a jigsaw to cut the wood to size and shape. The transom looks like yellow pine, but I'm not an expert on that sort of thing.

    This is the same young man I met yesterday at the print shop.



    There are a lot of kids in this program. They all have a full curriculum plus the projects to build. They have a grant from the Navy to build submarines.



    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 03-08-2017 at 02:57 PM. Reason: Up date

  18. #2083
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    MV, as late as the mid 1970's this type of printing was still being taught @ the university level to students who would be teaching jr. high & high schoolers

    this type of learning lasts a lifetime...

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  19. #2084
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I had printing (just like this) in 8th grade in 1958/9.

  20. #2085
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    They build the subs and then compete with them in a local pool. They are remotely controlled with a long cable. While all they had in the classroom was a water filled barrel, I did get to see this one submerge.



    There is a port and a starboard thruster and a down thruster. Naturally, all I could see in the barrel was the submerging.



    Here is one of last year's boats.



    Another project is building cardboard boats. Some boats last for only one trip others go on for five or six trips. My guess is that these have not yet been to sea.

    Another guess, June 8 will be the launch date.



    Out in the hall these three young ladies were painting a mural. The teacher told them to paint what ever they wanted. And the did!



    This is the teacher I met yesterday. Notice the sign behind him?



    I think this explains the project quite well.

    http://www.nhregister.com/general-ne...lding-sailboat



    Last edited by Morgan Volunteer; 03-09-2017 at 12:30 PM.

  21. #2086
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Mayflower II and Mystic Seaport appear to be doing a first class job with the restoration. They have bought an enclosure that will completely cover the ship.

    Early in the morning the crew was installing the base. Later in the day the vertical supports were up on the starboard side.







    I spoke with some of the install crew, who drove up from Florida for this job, and asked how long the cover was good for. He said it should last 20 years with reasonable care. Some of the reasonable care is that every six months or so you need tightening down the straps.

    I believe it will be done when I get back next Tuesday.

    The Mayflower II guys are using the Wood Miser almost all the time.



    They bought this at the Wooden Boat show. The guy selling the saws attends every year and usually sells at least one every year.







  22. #2087
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    I got to help Nate work on the Wolverine engine. Last week he and Jim drove over to a shop that Jim knows. They rebuild big diesel engines such as for tugs and ferries. The valve stem is too big for our shop's valve grinder. It turns out that the shop they went to has the same valve grinder. So Nate had to set up a Dumore grinder on the lathe.

    Before. This is the only valve that needed help.



    During.



    Last week he had the number three piston out and the rod end fell into the sump. It wasn't a huge problem but it was very awkward.

    The one on the left with the studs is the rod cap.



    To get it back together he had to prop the cap on a 2x4 just long enough and stable enough so it wouldn't fall apart. Here he is trying to pry it up and move the 2x4 into place. It took several tries.



    One thing that can be said about working on a diesel, you don't go home smelling like a rose.

    Once the cap was set up, the piston could be installed. The trick was to compress the rings (Three people, my contribution) and tap the piston down without knocking off the cap. Easy, anybody could do it. Yeah, right.





    Next week he'll put the head together and put it back on the engine.

    Start up may be soon. One obstacle is the air in the shop is not big enough. Scott needs to use the forklift and bring the Atlas' compressor up to the shop.

  23. #2088
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Dean has mostly finished the throat halyard crane for LA Dunton. The ring will wrap around the mast. The next step is to send it out to be galvanized.



    This thing is really a work of metal art. Remember, this was cut out of a thick steel plate and machined to this shape.





    This has been an off and on project for months. On the right, the Sabino engine rod bearings are tightened down so when he turns over the engine, the blue will rub off and show the high spots.



    After taking the bearing off he scraped the high spot and repeated the whole process again, and again, and again.



    The Babbitt is very soft so taking off a couple of thousandths is not hard to do. I asked why he doesn't just bore it out. The reason is the alignment of the hole. If it were bored out, the center of the hole would not be perfectly aligned with the connecting rod.



    The tool looks like a file with no teeth. The cutting surface on this one is concave.

  24. #2089
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 9, 2017

    Nate went to the seaport on Thursday to work on the Wolverine. While there, the Mayflower II canopy was being erected. Or so they thought.

    First, move the stairs.





    Then raise the arch.



    Then the snag.



    The man lifts are not tall enough to reach the lifting straps. So for now they will be back in a few days to start again.



  25. #2090
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 16, 2017

    We had a blizzard on Tuesday and the seaport was closed. It wasn't much of a blizzard as those things go, but it was rather a long day. I hire a guy to plow now so my wife and I watched a couple of movies on Netflix. We started out with 10 to 12" of snow but at the end it started to rain. We ended up with about six inches with a nice hard crust of ice. The weatherman said in January we never got cold enough to reach the normal high temperature. Now he said in March we haven't been able to get up to the normal lows. Go figure, it's New England. If you don't like the weather here, wait a minute.

    So, we met on Thursday this week.

    Last week the man-lifts could not reach high enough to untie the straps when the crane lifted upper framework on Mayflower II's new enclosure. On Monday they rented new and taller equipment and Anne was there. She had a job away from the shipyard that day so all she got was a before and after shot. Not any from during.







    When I arrived yesterday, they were welding brackets together. All the tops were in place.



    Mystic, in eastern Connecticut, did not get much of the "blizzard."





  26. #2091
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    It's a little hard to see it, but it looks like Jamie is installing scaffolding.





    It's going to be one fancy "shed."



    Here you can see that Mayflower II needed help.

    The chain plate and dead eye are pretty rough.



    One of the two pieces have rusted through.



    The wood keeps coming. The trick here will be to position the log so they can get something out of it. It has quite a twist.



    However, there was no cutting at this point. The starter motor on the saw was dead.

  27. #2092
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wayne and I worked on Sabino's wheelhouse. On Sunday the Saint Patrick's Day Parade will be held and the seaport has always participated. Sabino is nearing it's restoration and the wheel house will be displayed on a "float."

    So we attended to a few details. Wayne scraped paint off some of the hardware.



    Noah put back on the signs and hardware.





    And I sanded the unpainted strip on top. It will be primed for the parade but later a 1/2 round trim will be added. The trim is one of those details no one will ever notice is missing during the parade, but to keep her authentic, it will be done.





  28. #2093
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A whale boat that is stationed on "the hard" over next to the Morgan is set so children can get in and play. It's in the paint shop for freshening up.



    The inside is painted a very light green.



    Here you can see why she is no longer used in the water. She may be a bit dry, but look at the paint that dripped for the inside.



    The kids love it anyway.

    This boat has been worked on in the paint shop too. The copper protects the wood when ice forms around the hull. She has a few new bottom planks and new copper too.



    To keep the bottom wet, they rags are kept wet until it's ready to go back in the water.



    The guys in the paint shop think it's 30 to 35 years old.

    The new Garvey has the gunnel in place.



  29. #2094
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Thanks for the link!

  30. #2095
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 21, 2017

    A beautiful waterfront on a early spring morning.











    Mayflower II has a new home.



  31. #2096
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Anne took a few pictures of the tarp going up.









    When I arrived yesterday they were trying to install the end pieces, but there was a problem.



    The lift wasn't tall enough.



  32. #2097
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Hey boss, we have a little problem.



    It's not the first time height has been a problem on this job. I spoke with one of the guys and he told me that when they ordered the rental equipment, this was the tallest they could get at the time.

    He also told me that they have installed lots of buildings this size and often even larger. However, putting it up with Mayflower II already inside presented some challenges. Now they wait for taller equipment.

    Meanwhile, Wayne and I sanded the bottom of the Garvey that needs to be in the water this week. The whale boats will be going back in and the guys need to be able to bail them out as needed. There are other boats on moorings that need pumping during the season and this is the boat most often used for the job.

    I elected to let Wayne go underneath as I needed to take the pictures.



    Who is Maynard Bray?

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/news/2013/aidas-new-home/

    I did my share of sanding too, honest.



    Spring is coming. Small boats are being launched.








  33. #2098
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Later in the afternoon, I picked up a job priming some rebuilt chain plates.



    Anne was taking the paint of one of Sabino's doors.



    Wayne was painting the windows.





    Word has it that Sabino's new boiler will be tested and approved by the Coast Guard. We're getting closer.

    Tom was working on the base of the Dunton's mast.



    Later I was able to get my truck unloaded.

    Last fall I took a box full of old blocks home. The plan was to drive them down to the South Street Seaport so they could use the for parts. Mystic has more than enough on the shelf and these were really shot. Good hardware, lousy wood. In the meantime, South Street ended up with more than they need so yesterday I brought them back. I covered them with shrink wrap and at least now they are out of the weather.



    I spoke with Quentin about possibly selling them at the Wooden Boat Show. They are pretty rough, but do have some history. They can be used for display, but in no way can the be used to lift. Not all of them, but certainly some, came off the Morgan during the restoration. Quentin will let me know on this one.


  34. #2099
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    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    March 28, 2017

    Wayne and I spent the morning with a smelly job. We cleaned the ice eaters that had protected the Morgan during the winter. Smelling like low tide for the rest of the day is always pleasant. Well it didn't take long.





    While we scrubbed, Anne painted the side windows from Sabino.



    Mayflower II is all bundled up now, even with doors installed.







    This is so much better than during the Morgan restoration. Dry and warm and safe up to 110 mph winds. (Or so I was told)


  35. #2100
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    1,746

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    The more interesting part of my day was starting the Wolverine engine for the first time.

    Back in October of 2016, the Wolverine engine arrived at the seaport as an addition to the marine engine collection. The engine came out of Flora, a local fishing boat. Built in 1906, this fishing boat sank at the dock. Our engine replaced the original engine in 1926.



    Nate has been working on it since then.

    This was the day to try and start it. We have been waiting for the electrician to hard wire a compressor for three weeks, but so far not much has happened. The easy fix is go and grab the compressor from the Atlas engine. It can plug into the welder's socket. No electrician needed.





    Starting the engine was an all day project. Every try to get it running failed until the very end of the day. It was trial and error finding the right positions for all the levers that make it run.

    Every time it was tried, a new set of wicks had to be installed. The engine uses a cotton wick soaked in saltpeter. A few weeks back you can see Nate making them. The wicks are only needed for start up. Many cars and trucks use glow plugs. This is the same principal.

    Lighting the wicks is the easy part.





    They screw into the side of each head.





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