Page 71 of 71 FirstFirst ... 21617071
Results 2,451 to 2,473 of 2473

Thread: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

  1. #2451
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Wayne and I had an interesting job yesterday.

    When the Morgan was hauled for her restoration in 2008, one of the earliest jobs was removing the ceiling planks and
    that exposed the very bottom of the ship. After 167 years, a lot of stuff had landed in the bilge. Some of it had been removed during earlier restorations but not in the center of the ship. When it was all cleaned out, each little pile of "stuff" was numbered and bagged. The bags were identified by the frame numbers to each side and whether it was port of starboard. (15-16 Stbd for example)

    A lot of sifting and sorting of this "stuff" was done during the restoration. However, not all of it got sorted. During that time, not much was found. No coins, whale bones, knives, or very much of any thing else. Then, as things happen, the unsorted stuff went under the bench where it was stored and forgotten about. It was right out in plane sight but other jobs got in the way.

    So, we got the job.

    There are four of these bins with Zip Lock bags of "stuff."



    Wayne is suited up and ready.



    It was very dirty work. The dry stuff was very dusty and the wet stuff was like working with thick mud. There seemed no in between. Therefore, I didn't pick up my camera very often.



    Most of what we found was little pieces of rotten wood. Of the identifiable item we found there were some pieces of trunnels and the occasional lump of coal and ash from the galley stove. Wayne did find a small chunk of glass that I washed off. Our guess is that it came from a broken deck prism. Again, my hands were filthy. If it's still where I left it, I'll get a picture of it next week.

    Here, Wayne is sorting out some of the tinier bits of glass we found. They were about the size of a small pea.



    This family came by and the lady on the right found an interesting bit. It looked like a nail head going through a thin piece of wood. It looked like the shaft of the nail was rusted away under the head. Overall, it looked like on old button.

    I think she was hooked. She and her husband were from Pennsylvania and to volunteer would be a problem for the commute. I told her about the Pilots Program. It sounded like she knew about it. In the pilots program people come from all over to do volunteer jobs for a day or a weekend.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/join/communities/pilots/



    I think she was hooked.

    Back to work Wayne.





  2. #2452
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    A few weeks ago, the seaport accepted into the collection a dinghy that had been given to me years before. It was made in 1947 or 1948 by General Electric in Pittsfield, MA. It's probably the oldest fiberglass boat. That will be for others to research. In the meantime, the seats and oars have been varnished and the bottom prepped for painting. I volunteered to have it painted by a friend with a body shop.

    So, load it up.

    Wayne is checking out the latch that holds the top of the door closed.



    According to Quentin, it was made using an autoclave to cure the resin used at the time.



    Anne helped Wayne and me to sort out some of the Morgan "stuff" for about one minute. Check out her arm.



    That's the kind of job that stuff is.



    Her other arm is dirty too.

    Here she is using her weight to hold the bow up so we can put padding under it.



    All set to go.





  3. #2453
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 06, 2018

    It was one of those days. 94 degrees and humidity to match. Most of the schools in Connecticut do not have air conditioning so to keep on the 183 day schedule, the had early dismissal. Half day counts for a full day.

    Of course as a volunteer, we can take is easy too.

    So, the first thing we did was go to the planetarium for the monthly, First Thursday Lecture. Planetariums are dark. Flash is frowned upon. No pictures. What we learned about was sundials. There's a lot more to them than you might think.

    I came out with more knowledge than I went in with, but now I have more questions than ever before.

    Read here if you want more.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sundial

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/explore/planetarium/

    Another plus, the building is air conditioned.

    Lecture over, Wayne and I moved on.

    Slowly.

    As we passed the Morgan, there was some maintenance under way. The normal schedule is that she gets hauled once every three years. Today was just a mid cycle inspection.





    Maintenance goes on all the time. This was July, two years ago.



    Our next stop was the ship carver shop.

    Jeff has grown more beard since this video was taken.

    https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1873/4...bec5223b_b.jpg




    These carvings are his own. They are not available at the seaport, but he does sell them at the annual employee craft show. It's put on for and by seaport employees around Christmas. I'm not sure if the show is available for visitors.





    Trying to keep cool, we moved on.



  4. #2454
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    When we finally started to be productive, we sifted Morgan bilge stuff.

    Last week, the big find was this small chunk of glass. My guess is that it's from a broken deck prism. It's too thick to be a broken bottle, but much clearer than any deck prism I have seen.



    It's a little smaller than a quarter in size.

    We found small nails and parts of trunnels and mostly wood fibers of no particular shape.

    Quentin came by and told us why were weren't finding much. In the 1970's during an inspection of the bottom, the port and starboard garboards were removed and the hull was flushed. If there was anything good, that's when it would have been found.

    But, perhaps not everything.

    So we pressed on.



    Hey, what's this?

    An acorn?

    Did they park the boat under a tree?



    Next week we have one more tub of this stuff to go through. Perhaps it will be cooler. (The temperature and the stuff we find.)

    I was about to go on Mayflower II when Anne dragged me into the DuPont barn. It seems the guys have reached a milestone on Mayflower II and the basic hull is done. All the tools were now in the barn to be gone over, put away, and where needed, rebuilt.



    But the work still goes on. Jeff is making the deadeyes.



    He looks like the heat was getting to him.



    Mayflower II will be cooler next week.


  5. #2455
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 13, 2018

    Hurricane Florence has Wayne's attention this week. He called Tuesday and said he was deploying to the Carolinas to help out with the Red Cross. I talked to him yesterday and he was in Columbia SC. As of that time, he was waiting to see where he'll need to go.

    As I am writing now,
    Florence has just made landfall just south of Wilmington, NC.

    They have medals for people like Wayne, don't they?

    So,

    Last week, he and I sifted through Morgan bilge debris.

    Here he is last week.

    \

    I spoke again with Quentin who told me that in the previous cleaning of the bilge, they found clay pipes, whale's teeth, and all sorts of good things

    Basically, all we found was nothing. That is, nothing we didn't already have tons of such as broken pieces of trunnels, the odd piece of unidentifiable copper, the plastic straws,........

    But yesterday as I went through the last tow bins of this stuff, I found something interesting.

    A fork.

    It is very thin. I can't tell what it's made of, but it looks like silver or pewter.

    So, is it 1841 or 2008? I'm going with 1841. Makes a better story.




    In the paint shop, Susan is painting the Gerda III's name.



    Later in the day.






    On board Gerda III, trevor is repairing the deck and supports.



    The boat really needs a total rebuild, but the owners, The Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City, haven't been able to get the funds together to do the job. I know they're working on it. The president has been here and is working with the appropriate people to raise the money.



  6. #2456
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    There is some significant rot around the hatch.



    Nate has started working to get the engine running.

    There is little room to work. He has taken the reed valve off of the intake, cleaned it, and now is putting it back on. The reed valve consists of a leather flap that lays on a plate with a bunch of holes drilled into it. Has the piston rises it sucks air into the crankcase. Has the piston falls, the flap seals off the air so when the ports in the cylinder wall are exposed, the air rushes in. Standard two cycle except for the leather.





    Gramp was hauled out and winterized.



    https://www.mysticseaport.org/news/2...he-collection/




    You just can't get away from these critters.



    It doesn't take long.


  7. #2457
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    In the barn, Tom is getting ready to rough out another knee for Mayflower II.







    Deck materials are going through the planer. It looks like Doug fir to me.



    Note the guide that makes the planks into a parallelogram.



    Finally in the barn, Anne is cleaning up a mast from Mayflower II. She says that they need it clean so it can be inspected for faults.





  8. #2458
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    11,610

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Every cloud has a silver lining, I guess. Terrible as hurricanes are, I suppose there will be another big haul of good live oak for Mystic Seaport when "Florence" gets done with the Carolinas.

  9. #2459
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    After lunch I was able to take some time and tour the Mayflower II.

    In no particular order here, I climbed over and under the entire hull.





    My guess is that this would be called a covering board template.



    It's pine so it's not permanent, just a template.



    Above is port side. Below is starboard.






  10. #2460
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    One deck down in the bow, a knee hangs for installation, but no one is around to work on it.

















  11. #2461
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1


    New shipwright, Scott, is preparing a scarf join of one of Mayflower II's deck beams.








    Right next to Scott, Louie is planing the side of a crossbeam. I'm not sure why.







    It sounds like we (The volunteers) are going to be able to get more involved now that the basic hull is done. This is what Anne tells me and she is at the seaport almost every day.

    We'll see.


  12. #2462
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 20, 2018

    I talked to Wayne yesterday in the Carolina's. Working with the Red Cross, he is in charge of the Red Cross's mental health unit helping hurricane Florence victims. He has recently been given the new position of running the operation whereas before, he worked directly with those people who needed help.

    He said the worst is yet to come as the rivers have not yet crested in many areas. He hopes to be home sometime next week.

    Slow day for me. I sanded a new base for the Lathrop diesel. As Scott said, the old one was turning into mulch.



    Since I was alone, there was no one to take my picture.



    The brown cylinder above is a new air tank for starting the Gerda III's Hundested engine. Nate has been working on it to get it running again. The cylinder is the air supply that the engine uses to start. The old tank was removed a few years ago and no longer was safe to use. This one was made and the challenge now is to have it pressure tested. So far, he's still looking.

    While on the subject of Gerda III, Susan has finished the Gerda II name.

    The last little bit to do was to fill in the black around the Danish flags.



    All done.



    With sanding the new Lathrop engine mount, I had free time to wander.

    By the way, Lathrop engines were built in Mystic. You can see the building from the shipyard. There is a restaurant there now called, The Engine Room. http://www.engineroomct.com/

    I wandered.

    Louie is on the ship saw.



    This piece just came out of the planer. It's hull plank for Mayflower II.




  13. #2463
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1







    After lunch I took another walk. Sanding was going along at a pace that allowed long breaks.


    In the Mallory Building there is an unusual display of art done by Kevin Sampson.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/locati...-in-residence/

    His art is, for me anyway, unusual. I must say, after watching the video and reexamining my pictures, it's growing on me.

    It reminds me of Mardi Gras.





    It's made with bones and rope, pots and pans, and mostly the stuff he sees that belong.






  14. #2464
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1







    This explains it.



    Did you know the North had a submarine in the Civil War? I didn't.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Alligator_(1862)






    There are several works to see.

  15. #2465
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    As I said above, it reminds me of Mardi Gras.

    We went a few years ago. It was a hoot!



    The annual car show is this Sunday.

    https://www.mysticseaport.org/event/...-vehicle-show/

    I have a date Sunday afternoon, but hope to be there for the morning.

    Nate will be there with the Studebaker chassis and engine he rebuilt for the Chamberlin Mill. A former water driven mill became a Studebaker driven mill after a storm wiped out the dam. Because the Chamberlin Mill is a museum, Nate was allowed to use Mystic Seaport Museum facilities to make it like new. Well, almost.

    Nate started with this.



    I'll take a picture of the finished project on Sunday.

    The seaports 1929 Ford truck was giving fits on Thursday. It would start only sometimes. It needs to be ready for Sunday.

    I only got involved toward the end and I'm not sure we solved the problem.



    First, the 90 year old ignition switch was giving fits. But appears to be OK now.



    Setting the points didn't seem to help. The points opened to the right gap, but it seemed like the cam was worn out. While they opened to the correct setting, they didn't seem to close all the way. I have trouble believing that, but???

    Hey, that cam may be 90 years old too.



    I'm sure they will get it done, they have all day to do it.

  16. #2466
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    September 23, 2018 - The 21st Annual Antique Car Show

    All the cars need to be 1929, or older.

    I imagine that date was chosen because the seaports Ford truck is that old. On occasion, a truck is needed during museum hours and to keep the "ambiance" an old truck is more appropriate than a F350 Ford.



    Nate brought the Chamberlin Mill, Studebaker engine he rebuilt a few years ago. It's now mounted on its original chassis. When the saw mill dam washed out, the mill used this engine to power the saw.





    There is a home made governor. Nate does not have it hooked up because if it failed, the engine might destroy itself. It relies on two springs pulling on the throttle from opposite sides. If one broke, the other spring could hold the throttle wide open.

    The shaft bearings are made from a Model A piston. The shaft runs through the wrist pin hole.



    Nate's friend Andy, on the right, is also a Chamberlin Mill volunteer.



    Lots of wonderful old cars.

    The Stutz is registering. More on it later.






  17. #2467
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1





    Above, a Stanley Steamer.









    I have no idea what a Mile Master is.



    Or the red can that says Auto Motor Heater. I suppose it will warm up the engine for cold winter starts, but????

  18. #2468
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1
















  19. #2469
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1







    A truck built by Indiana










  20. #2470
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1


















  21. #2471
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1



    An International.





    Before



    After.





  22. #2472
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    This Ford is rather special, at least to its owners.

    The father got the car when he was 16. He kept until he gave it to his son. He went to the DMV and transferred the ownership to his son on the very day that he was born. So, Scott has owned this car his entire life. Scott is new to the seaport and is one of the shipwrights rebuilding Mayflower II.



    Scott on the right.



    The 1920 Stutz Bearcat











  23. #2473
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Orange ct
    Posts
    2,018

    Default Re: Charles W Morgan Restoration; A Volunteer's Perspective-1

    Detroit Electric Cars

    There were two cars on display and this may be out of order.





    One of these was a 1931 model. I find it amazing that in 1931, they were still using a tiller to steer.



    About the only difference I could see was the color.

    This is the other car.





    And last, but certainly not least, an Boat Tailed Auburn.



    Wanna buy one?

    http://www.auburnspeedsters.com/classifieds.htm



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •